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Old January 29th, 2009, 11:00 PM   #61
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Hi all,

Israel railways have released their ridership figures for 2008:

Total ridership was 35,136,000 passengers, up from 31,791,000 in 2007. Expected ridership for 2009 is 37,022,000.

Punctuality, BTW, was 91.32% for the year, and I can testify that there has been a huge improvement in punctuality over the last year, and even more so over the last month or so since IR opened its new national control center. I can barely remember a train that I used - and I use 4 a day - being more than a couple of minutes late during the entire month.
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Old January 30th, 2009, 05:48 PM   #62
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Do you know how they measure punctuality? I ask because here in Europe differences in definition make cross-country comparisons very difficult. At one extreme Switzerland considers more than 2 minutes behind schedule as a delay. At the other extreme, the French SNCF's trains are only "delayed" after 10 minutes - and moreover non-appearance of trains due to technical glitches and strikes are not included.
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Old January 31st, 2009, 02:04 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hans280 View Post
Do you know how they measure punctuality? I ask because here in Europe differences in definition make cross-country comparisons very difficult. At one extreme Switzerland considers more than 2 minutes behind schedule as a delay. At the other extreme, the French SNCF's trains are only "delayed" after 10 minutes - and moreover non-appearance of trains due to technical glitches and strikes are not included.
At the moment, a train is late if it reaches its FINAL destination more than five minutes behind schedule.

I read somewhere that now that they have the new control center, in the future they will be able to release punctuality figures for individual stations along the way too.

The Swiss figure seems a bit crazy to me. No reasonable passenger would consider a train to be late if it was delayed by three minutes.
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Old January 31st, 2009, 08:39 PM   #64
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I'd agree that the Swiss are a bit crazy, though not for the reason you mention. The reasons for the 2 minutes limit (well... reason? What's the chicken and the egg here?) is that they like to cut their time schedules to tight that commuters actually count on changing trains at any given station with a couple of minutes of buffer time. If the train they arrive with is 3 minutes late then they're stuck for a non-trivial amount of time. That said...

...the reason I hold them to be crazy is that they detest inaccuracies so much that they consider delays both in the positive and the negative. A train that arrives 3 minutes ahead of schedule in Switzerland is considered as "delayed".
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Old February 1st, 2009, 01:11 PM   #65
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Are you sure about that?

Somewhere else I read that the Swiss train schedule is calculated from the worst case, so that trains arrive ahead of schedule very often, and then wait quite long in the stations. If that would be counted as delayed, the punctuality percentage couldn't possibly be as high as it is.

But I can fully understand their 3 minute limit. Here in the Netherlands, the same limit is used. And that makes sense, because there are a lot of cross-platform interchanges where trains arrive at the same time and wait only a few minutes for people to change trains. A delay of 3 minutes means a lost connection and waiting half an hour.

Btw. I found an interesting picture:
[IMG]http://i41.************/347e8hs.gif[/IMG]
The x-axis shows the traffic density (in train-km / track-km), the y-axis shows the punctuality.
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Old February 1st, 2009, 04:06 PM   #66
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I'm only "sure" to the extent that I saw a statistic from SBB/CFF where they explained that according to their definition "delayed means 2 minutes too late or too early". Maybe the definition applied only to the report I read? But I think you're wrong when you say that the Swiss trains often arrive very early and wait at the platform. They write ex-treme-ly conservative time schedules, that is true, to avoid nasty surprises, but as far as I'm aware this makes them drive slowly out on the tracks - not wait in railway stations. I should here add that I lived in CH for three years and my subjective experiences further corroborate this: I saw plenty of "Intercities" travel at a leisurely pace, but I almost never saw trains lingering at the platforms.

Last edited by hans280; February 2nd, 2009 at 12:21 PM.
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Old February 14th, 2009, 04:53 PM   #67
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Yesterday I happened to be in Tel Aviv with a camera. Here are a couple of pictures and a video that I took at Tel Aviv Hahagana Station:





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Old March 19th, 2009, 12:55 PM   #68
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Hi all,

The first of the new Siemens trains went into regular service yesterday. I saw it while I was waiting for my train at Tel Aviv Central yesterday evening.

This picture was taken yesterday in Haifa:



(Picture credit: Chen Melling; the Tapuz Public Transport Forum)
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Old March 24th, 2009, 10:35 AM   #69
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Sunday morning I found the new Siemens train waiting for me on platform 2 of Modiin Central station:



40 minutes later at Tel Aviv Central:



These are cellphone pics so please excuse the less-than-perfect quality.

As for the train, I think it is kind of odd-looking, but nice and modern inside.
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Old March 25th, 2009, 09:24 AM   #70
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Now that a partly-underground metro is planned for Tel Aviv, I was wondering if anybody given any thought to how to deal with the security issue? What I mean is, in Israel you have to go through a metal detector and have your hand luggage checked simply to go into a supermarket. Will they do likewise with their mass transport service? I don't see how they can avoid doing it. On the other hand, judging by Paris where people sprint in and out of metro stations to catch connecting trains, that will seriously devalue the system.
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Old March 25th, 2009, 09:41 AM   #71
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Quote:
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Now that a partly-underground metro is planned for Tel Aviv, I was wondering if anybody given any thought to how to deal with the security issue? What I mean is, in Israel you have to go through a metal detector and have your hand luggage checked simply to go into a supermarket.
huh? where have u heard that?
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Old March 25th, 2009, 12:40 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hans280 View Post
Now that a partly-underground metro is planned for Tel Aviv, I was wondering if anybody given any thought to how to deal with the security issue? What I mean is, in Israel you have to go through a metal detector and have your hand luggage checked simply to go into a supermarket. Will they do likewise with their mass transport service? I don't see how they can avoid doing it. On the other hand, judging by Paris where people sprint in and out of metro stations to catch connecting trains, that will seriously devalue the system.
Well, it's true that there are security checks at the entrances to the railway stations, but you don't get checked again when you change trains. I assume that at stations where the metro and railways connect the same will be true; you'll get off one and onto the other at different platforms in the same station.

This is just me guessing so if anyone else knows better then please tell us.
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Old March 26th, 2009, 07:17 AM   #73
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Quote:
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huh? where have u heard that?
Heard what? That the Israelis are meshuggener about security? From my wife. She's from Netanya. But...

...you're right, there was of course a tad of provocation in my question: last week I walked straight into the ministerial corridor of the Ministry of Finance in my native Copenhagen. The Danes see no reason to have a guard by the door. Last month I had to wait in a line to enter the Dizengoff Centre. - And as for having a face check in railway stations...
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Old May 23rd, 2009, 10:57 PM   #74
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Hi all,

These rather nice aerial photos were posted by Israel Railways on a local forum. I assume they're publicity pics:


Taken near Haifa:






Taken outside Ben Gurion Airport:



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Old May 26th, 2009, 01:48 AM   #75
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fantastic trains and stations
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Old June 3rd, 2009, 08:37 PM   #76
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Quote:
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fantastic trains and stations
Not so fantastic apparently

The latest news is that IR have withdrawn the one and only Siemens train that has so far gone into service, because of faults.

Siemens are so going to get sued. Not only did they supply the trains 9 months late, now they're full of bugs . . .
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Old June 4th, 2009, 10:43 AM   #77
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fantastic trains and stations
Israel Railways is one of the best in the world that utilized DMU trains.
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Old June 4th, 2009, 10:44 AM   #78
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Old June 8th, 2009, 11:42 PM   #79
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New DMUs for Israel in Slovenia this week from Czech Republic






@milchy

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Old August 10th, 2009, 04:07 PM   #80
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Quote:
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Not so fantastic apparently

The latest news is that IR have withdrawn the one and only Siemens train that has so far gone into service, because of faults.

Siemens are so going to get sued. Not only did they supply the trains 9 months late, now they're full of bugs . . .
Hi all,

Following up my previous posting - the Siemens trains are back in service. There are now four of them running, with a fifth apparently nearing completion and almost ready to go. I believe there will eventually be eight of them, apparently by the end of 2009.

Personally I think they are kind of odd-looking, but they are nice and modern and comfortable, and certainly a huge step up from the old crates that they are replacing. I think there are only 1 or 2 of the old slam-door trains left in regular service now, and they will go when the rest of the Siemens trains are put into service.
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