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Old August 13th, 2009, 05:18 AM   #81
Nick in Atlanta
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Is there a reason that the trains run on the left set of tracks while roads in Israel are driven on the right side. I assume that it may be a relic from when the British were in charge.
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Old August 13th, 2009, 01:12 PM   #82
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double deck trains are great
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Old August 13th, 2009, 04:09 PM   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick in Atlanta View Post
Is there a reason that the trains run on the left set of tracks while roads in Israel are driven on the right side. I assume that it may be a relic from when the British were in charge.
No idea, but I assume you're right.
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Old August 25th, 2009, 02:47 PM   #84
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Many European countries have their trains running on the left side, including France, Belgium, Switzerland, Austria and Italy. Mostly because their first locomotives where English. Wikipedia is your friend
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Old October 12th, 2009, 03:07 PM   #85
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Hi all,

The last of the old slam-door trains were finally withdrawn from service recently, thank goodness.

They have been replaced by the new Siemens trains, seven of which are now in service, out of a total of 10.

The old things were in service for almost 50 years, so I guess they deserve some respect, so here's one final picture before they sink into history:

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Old October 12th, 2009, 09:59 PM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E.L. SLOVENIA View Post
New DMUs for Israel in Slovenia this week from Czech Republic
Anyone knows which route those DMUs took to arrive to Israel from Europe ?
As far as I know, the Israeli network is not connected to any of his
neighboors...
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Old October 13th, 2009, 12:15 AM   #87
E.L. SLOVENIA
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From Port of Koper to Israel.
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Old October 13th, 2009, 06:10 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natarajan1986 View Post
double deck trains are great
Not so great, IMHO: The conclusion drawn here in France is that that they are useful on medium to long-distance travels. The suburban lines around Paris are about to phase out their double deckers because they are too slow: not only are they heavier than other trains (and hence slow to brake and even slower to accelerate), the train also has to wait for at least half a minute longer at each stations because the passenger exit takes a lot longer. (Time to get down the stairs, bottlenecks when the "upstairs" meet the "downstairs"...)

In the future, short-distance trains in France will, I think, be mostly tram-like long snakes, with an open passage in the entire length of the train and no space wasted on connecting pieces between waggons. They claim that such trains will have the same passenger capacity as the double deckers - and SNCF has already ordered the first batch from Canadian (!!) Bombardier.

Last edited by hans280; October 13th, 2009 at 09:01 PM.
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Old October 13th, 2009, 07:55 PM   #89
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There's nothing odd about SNCF buying from Bombardier, which has over the years bought up companies in France, Germany, the UK and elsewhere. It claims to be "the global leader in the rail equipment manufacturing and servicing industry", and the Bombardier Transportation headquarters are now in Berlin, because most of its business is in Europe.
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Old October 13th, 2009, 09:05 PM   #90
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Nothing odd in general, I agree, since railway material is becoming an incredibly "international" business. However, this is seen as the first tranche of a BIG series of orders for replacement of rolling stock. It was not terribly popular with the French public and press that the order went to a foreign company - especially one from a country that has never, ever (or so the French press says) bought foreign-produced trams or trains.
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Old December 26th, 2009, 12:23 PM   #91
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Bad news. I only just learnt that this story went up on Jerusalem Post over the summer:

"The construction of a high-speed railway link between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv which will cut travel time to less than half an hour has been essentially suspended and at least seven years is needed to complete the work, Israel Railways said Monday.

The $750 million route, which originally was supposed to start running last year, will not be ready before 2016 at the earliest, Israel Railways spokesman Shahar Wiesman said.

He said that the project is currently being held up over a dispute with environmental groups over a valley in the hills on the outskirts of Jerusalem, where a 150-meter bridge is supposed to be constructed for the train line.

"The inauguration of the fast rail line to Jerusalem will take between six and seven years to complete from the day that work begins after all the statutory permits are received," Israel Railways said in a written press release.

The release said that ballooning costs as a result of environmental group demands were endangering the whole project.

Environmental groups on Monday rejected as baseless lies the charges that they were the cause of the delays.

"The only thing that Israel Railways has succeeded in doing in this project is to lie," said Shaked Avraham, a senior official with the Society for the Protection of Nature who has been involved in the negotiations. "They cannot transfer their disgrace to green groups."

Last month, a government watchdog report found that serious lapses in the planning and budgeting of the project essentially stopped work on the line.

The report by State Comptroller Micha Lindenstrauss cited repeated construction delays stemming from poor planning and incorrect budgeting of the mega-project."

* * *

That's bloody depressing! I visit Israel at least once a year to see my inlaws, and I had convinced myself that they'd get cracking on that line prolongation within the next year or two. One cannot but agree with Mr. Lindenstrauss: if they need more time to build 30 km between Modi'in and Jerusalem than the Chinese needed to build 1200 km between Beijing and Shanghai then they probably DO have a problem with planning.

Ah well, in consequence, Saudi Arabia will be the first country in the Middle East with a modern railway line. Alla'hu Akhbar!

Last edited by hans280; December 27th, 2009 at 11:11 AM.
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Old December 27th, 2009, 09:46 PM   #92
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Ah well, in consequence, Saudi Arabia will be the first country in the Middle East with a modern railway line. Alla'hu Akhbar!
You forget Turkey, which already has one...
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Old December 27th, 2009, 10:23 PM   #93
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Not really. Turkey could be considered, as our Turkish friends never stop telling us, as a European nation. Similarly, there's likely to be a HS line in Morocco before there's one in Saudi Arabia, but, whereas Marocco is a mostly Arabic country, it cannot really be considered as "Middle East".
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Old December 28th, 2009, 12:05 AM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hans280 View Post
Not really. Turkey could be considered, as our Turkish friends never stop telling us, as a European nation. Similarly, there's likely to be a HS line in Morocco before there's one in Saudi Arabia, but, whereas Marocco is a mostly Arabic country, it cannot really be considered as "Middle East".
I beg to disagree. The new turkish railways high-speed line is definitely east of the Bosphorus, which means, for me at least, that it is in Asia. Turkey
pretends to obtain EU membership, ok, but that does not mean it is an
european country.
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Old December 31st, 2009, 03:18 PM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hans280 View Post
Bad news. I only just learnt that this story went up on Jerusalem Post over the summer:

"The construction of a high-speed railway link between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv which will cut travel time to less than half an hour has been essentially suspended and at least seven years is needed to complete the work, Israel Railways said Monday. . . .
Hi all,

I've basically given up trying to follow the never ending saga of the line to Jerusalem, but these are the latest developments according to Wikipedia:

"On June 23, 2009, the environmentalists' petitions were rejected, and the planning committee decided that there would be a bridge over the Yitla Stream, in line with the previous recommendations of the Sadan Committee. Israel Railways and the Jerusalem Municipality supported the decision. The decision in favor of a bridge over the stream was ratified by the National Planning Committee in August 2009, subject to design changes to be made to the bridge site to make it more environmentally-friendly"

"Sha'ar HaGai and Mevaseret Zion - section 'C' - the tender was awarded in September 2009 and preliminary site work began November 2009 with expected overall completion in 2015/2016."

So, although the project is going to be badly delayed, things are at least moving.
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Old January 1st, 2010, 11:28 AM   #96
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Pity we have to wait until 2016 (at the earliest) to see progress. But, then again, I understand from my readings on the internet that this Section C is by far the most challenging in terms of engineering. Presumably, whilst waiting for the - slow - completion of this section the authorities will want to tender and complete the other remaining parts of the line? Otherwise paying good money for a Sha'ar HaGai/Mevaseret Zion connection seems to make little sense: it is located in the middle of the missing 30 km.

One question, RoadUser: do you know if this means that the authorities have finally made a firm decision about what route to pursue? I'm asking because the Wikipedia page you cite proposes several alternative corridors. The invocation of Sha'ar HaGai must mean that they're going for corridor "A" and, as far as I can see, probably version "A1"?
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Old January 1st, 2010, 12:42 PM   #97
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the scenery route of Tel Aviv - Jerusalem line















__________________
Tel Aviv metropolitan area :

230+ towers built & U.C

129+ towers approved

100 towers proposed
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Old January 2nd, 2010, 08:18 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hans280 View Post

One question, RoadUser: do you know if this means that the authorities have finally made a firm decision about what route to pursue? I'm asking because the Wikipedia page you cite proposes several alternative corridors. The invocation of Sha'ar HaGai must mean that they're going for corridor "A" and, as far as I can see, probably version "A1"?
As far as I understand it, the A1 route was chosen years ago. The tree huggers (and various technical resasons) delayed it until recently, when the appeals were rejected and the National Planning Committee ratified it.

Practically the entire way from the bridge over Road 3 near Latrun to Jerusalem is underground, which is why it is going to take so long to build. No tunneling on this scale has ever been undertaken in this country. the longest tunnel in the country at the moment goes into Modiin Central railway station, and is about 3 km long. This will be overtaken by the Carmel Tunnels in Haifa when they open. The tunnels on the Jerusalem railway line are something like 3 times longer than these.

The abovementioned bridge, BTW, is also the longest in the country. It is already built, but, of course, not yet in use.
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Old April 7th, 2010, 03:45 PM   #99
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Hi, it would be nice if you could join this thread and attach pictures of examples of different solutions for helping disabled persons to board the train.

Barrier-free transport for the disabled - wheelchair lifts
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Old June 28th, 2010, 08:29 PM   #100
zvir
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new/upgraded lines of israel railways-you tube video

1. upgraded line tel-aviv-lod -beersheba:
double track, new geometry when needed
that will allow tel aviv -Beersheba in 50 minutes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dM9F7kayKsk

2.new line ashdod-tel aviv
suburban new line on the freeway median.

http://www.youtube.com/user/IsraelRa.../0/qBMmdoPv6SU
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