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Old April 20th, 2005, 10:54 PM   #1
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Durban Harbour - Lifeline of the SADC region

This thread is dedicated to the Durban Harbour, one of the busiest in the world and the busiest in Africa. The port handles 65% of all port activities in South Africa in terms of value...and is expected to handle over 3 million TEUS per annum by 2010 from the 2004 level of 1,45 million TEUS.

At present R4,5 billion of development is approved and underway at the port and a further R5 billion of investment is likely in the next 4 years.

Besides being the soul and centre of the city of Durban, the port is one of the mainstays of the South African economy.
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Old April 20th, 2005, 10:55 PM   #2
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Durban port keeps pole position

April 20, 2005

By Terry Hutson

The awarding of nearly half a billion rand in contracts for harbour works, announced in Network last week, is just a hint of the sheer volume of investment pouring into the port of Durban that will ensure good sailing ahead for South Africa’s premier port.

In recent months government has repeatedly said it would continue to support Durban as the main gateway to the Gauteng industrial heartland of South Africa, but nevertheless there have been deep-seated concerns among many port users that the focus of attention had switched to the Eastern Cape and the new port at Coega in particular.

This fear has now been put to rest after market forces made only one decision possible.

So far more than R4.73 billion worth of projects to improve services in the port have been approved by Transnet, involving R1.45 billion for the upgrade of Pier 1 as a container terminal, R1.6 billion for the Port of Durban Development Project (PDD) requiring the construction of new berths at the Point and a new rail terminal, the reconstruction of Island View berths 5 and 6 valued at R180 million, and the widening and deepening of the port entrance channel costing R1.5 billion.

Despite this mark of confidence there are many who continue to say Durban has little future growth potential because all facilities are now occupied. With some justification, they cast an anxious eye at both Coega and towards the resurgent port of Maputo, which is becoming an attractive alternative for the industry of Gauteng and mining and farming interests in Mpumalanga and Limpopo.

But in view of the confidence shown by Transnet (and therefore government), has Durban reason to be concerned? The recently compiled port master plan, which is expected to be made public by July, should provide the answer to these concerns, but will certainly respond to those keen to erect “House Full” signs around Durban harbour.

Among these plans is likely to be the takeover of Salisbury Island from the Defence Force – involving what could turn out to be a controversial filling in of the water area between Pier 1 and Salisbury Island. The cost of converting Salisbury Island for container use? Probably as high as R3.5 billion.

Other areas of expansion for Durban involve the remodeling of Maydon Wharf, which already has several joint ventures underway and has completed readjusting leases with the Unilever and Bidvest Groups with others to follow. Resulting from this, one can expect a Maydon Wharf that works smarter with increased throughput and productivity.


The port master plan will also deal with the Bayhead area, and the possibility of long-term future expansion in this direction, including container handling.

Also under the spotlight at Bayhead is ship repair and building – important cogs for the creation of a world-class reason for shipping to call in at the port.

One of the frustrations facing ship repairers in Durban is the lack of world-class facilities and an apparent inertia by the National Ports Authority in dealing with some of the issues.

In recent years little or no capital expenditure has gone into improving the Durban dry dock, despite extremely high rates charged for services – Durban is reputed to be the third most expensive dry dock repair facility in the world.

On the plus side, local ship repairers have shown initiative in dealing with the challenges by bringing in a floating dock (Elgin) and introducing other technologies that allow them to repair ships while still in the water (Dormac).

There is also talk of either building a private dry dock or bringing another large floating dock to the port, while both companies are also expanding their operations to other ports.

On top of these future projects, SA Port Operations (Sapo) continues to gear up with new infrastructure, equipment and joint ventures with private operators in Durban.

The Durban Car Terminal remains world class and just a week ago was awarded ISO 9001:2000 accreditation for the second year running to go with its NOSCAR rating, also approved for a second successive year. Further extensions are on the cards for this terminal.

During May the first of three new shoreside gantry cranes being built locally by Argentinean company IMPSA will be tested, and only last week Sapo began advertising a tender for the supply of 12 new rubber-tyred gantry cranes for Durban’s new Container Terminal No.2.

With all this and more to come, Durban as a port has much to look forward to.
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Old April 20th, 2005, 10:56 PM   #3
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Rubber-tyred cranes for new container terminal

April 20, 2005

By Terry Hutson

Durban’s new container terminal at Pier 1 will be equipped with rubber-tyred gantry cranes, a radical departure from previous practice in the port of using only straddle carriers, which will be welcomed by potential terminal operators.

A small advert, tucked away among the Mercury’s classifieds last week, called for tenders for the supply of 12 rubber-tyred gantry cranes for Pier 1, where a new container terminal is under development.

With serious work expected to begin quite soon on the conversion of Pier 1 for container handling, additional tenders to supply new infrastructure is possible.

The decision to go the route of RTGs instead of the straddle carrier operation in use at the Durban Container Terminal (DCT) and other South African ports indicates a new and welcome approach to increasing capacity and productivity at the terminals.

For environmental and other reasons, port planners and engineers can no longer continue filling in water areas in the bay and there is an increasing realisation that for Durban to expand its port operations, better use must be made of existing space.


One solution seems so logical that it cries out – vertical expansion, which Durban’s fleet of straddle carriers has largely prevented – containers at DCT are stacked two-high, compared with up to seven high at other leading ports.

Pier 1 will provide about 1km of quayside and berthing area for a designated capacity of about 600 000 TEUs and it seems likely that a private/public partnership will be sought for this operation to provide healthy competition for DCT, with SA Port Operations (Sapo) continuing to operate the latter as a separate business.

Most modern container terminals now make use of RTGs, because of the economical solutions they provide combined with maximum storage density.

The machines consist of four vertical masts with topbeams joining the masts and carry their own powerpack and lifting mechanism in addition to an operator’s cabin (some can be fitted for remote control).

They are capable of twin lifts and able to move about the yard like giant beetles loading, unloading, re-arranging and shifting containers.
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Old April 20th, 2005, 10:58 PM   #4
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Good news as cruise ships head to Durban

April 13, 2005

By Terry Hutson

The coming summer season has all the markings of being a bumper one as far as cruise ship calls to Durban and Richards Bay are concerned. So far, at least 68 port calls have been identified, including 38 calls extending to late April 2006 by the Durban-based Rhapsody.

Among the ships expected next summer are Saga Rose, Saga Ruby, Silver Wind, Deutschland, Pacific Princess, Prinsendam, Crystal Serenity, Hanseatic, Europa, Alexander von Humboldt, Van Gogh, Royal Star, Oriana and Vistamar.

Some of these will make multiple calls at Durban and Richards Bay and several will end and begin cruises from Durban.

Full details of the cruise ships arriving at Durban and Richards Bay, as well as at other southern African ports, will be available later this week on the Ports & Shipping website at www.ports.co.za


Additional excitement and interest is also likely to develop around news that the former Viking Bordeaux, better known once as Stella Maris, will be arriving in Durban in October and will be based here permanently.

The ship, to be renamed Madagascar, will undertake cruises throughout the year along the southern and east African coasts and among Indian Ocean islands.

The new owners of the ship are Durban-based property, hospitality and investment company éLan Group. Further details of this initiative will appear on these pages in the coming weeks.
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Old April 20th, 2005, 11:03 PM   #5
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Durban container surcharge dropped

April 13, 2005

By Samantha Enslin

In the strongest signal yet that efficiency at the Durban container terminal had improved, shipping lines yesterday removed a $100 (R600) port congestion surcharge on containers moving through the terminal.

The surcharge, which has cost cargo owners more than R1 billion, was imposed in 2003 in response to inefficiency at the terminal, which was forcing shipping lines to wait as long as four days to berth.

Shipping lines yesterday took heed of the rebuke by Alec Erwin, the Public Enterprises Minister, earlier this week that the surcharge was unfair because the terminal had met the conditions for its removal.


When the surcharge was imposed, shipping lines said it would remain until the average delay to vessels berthing was less than 16 hours.

Yesterday, four shipping lines - Mediterranean Shipping Company, Safmarine, Deutsche Afrika-Linien and Maersk Sealand - said the surcharge would be lifted from May 1.

Erwin declined to comment. His spokeswoman said a joint statement with Transnet would be issued later.
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Old April 20th, 2005, 11:07 PM   #6
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Further R300m expansion for Durban Car Terminal


Durban - The Durban car terminal, which recently underwent a R100 million expansion, will soon be too small to meet demand as car manufacturers secure additional contracts and port authorities are planning a further expansion.

Pumi Motsoahae, the National Port Authorities' port infrastructure manager, said yesterday "the message is very clear that by 2006/07 additional facilities will be needed".

Protekon, a Transnet subsidiary, was working on the initial details of a project to expand the car terminal, which could cost around R300 million, he said.

Expansion of the car terminal could either include an extension to the new three-level parking garage, an additional standalone car park parallel to Shepstone road or a car park straddling the railway lines.

Motsoahae said objections to a further expansion to the car terminal would relate to an anticipated increase in road congestion. However, the plan was to have this additional parking garage serviced solely by rail.

Other expansion plans are focusing on increasing berthing capacity. Currently, only one vessel can berth at a time. The construction of a finger jetty perpendicular to the quayside may make it possible to berth two vessels simultaneously.

However, the dilemma confronting port authorities is, while this jetty is being constructed, which is estimated to take 18 months, the berthing of car carriers.

These plans follow the recent completion of a parking garage and bridge linking the quayside to the terminal, which has increased the terminal's capacity from 3 500 to 7 000 parking bays.

In the year to March, the car terminal handled 143 000 vehicles and that is projected to grow to 160 000 in by March 2005.

The improved facilities at the car terminal have reduced risk and increased productivity.

Since the new car terminal became operational earlier this year, the turnaround time for offloading vehicles had improved from 100 an hour to 180 hour.

Vehicle manufacturers gave permission to move orders at night as the bridge was well lit and monitored by surveillance.
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Old April 20th, 2005, 11:08 PM   #7
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New fruit terminal opens

April 6, 2005

The opening of a new R61.5 million fruit terminal on Maydon Wharf will significantly improve opportunities for South African citrus producers to increase sales of citrus to countries with strict import protocols.

Last year South Africa exported 120 000 pallets of citrus to Japan, which has one of the strictest steri-protocols of any nation. The new Maydon Wharf Fruit Terminal, a joint venture between the Oceana Group and SA Port Operations, handled 35 000 pallets in its first season - the balance being exported via another Durban terminal, Fresh Produce Terminals.

Guests at the official opening last week heard how the Maydon Wharf Terminal expects to increase its exports to Japan to 67 000 pallets this year and is seeking to break into the Chinese market.

South African citrus producers are keen to break the stranglehold that other countries, notably the United States, have on the Asian market. An estimated 26 million trees have been planted locally in the last eight years and an additional 30 million cartons of citrus should become available for sale by 2010, boosting the total to 100 million cartons and leaving farmers and their marketers to find new export markets.


Currently 75% of South African export production goes into central Europe and the UK, but in recent years SA has developed an emerging market in Russia, while sales to the Middle East have grown by between 30% and 40% since 2001. The Department of Trade and Industry forecasts that fruit exports to the UAE will have doubled by the end of next year's season.

The South African season is sandwiched between May and October.

China is one of the country's big hopes regarding fruit exports, particularly since South Africa and China signed protocols in mid 2004 providing formal access to the Chinese citrus market.

The Citrus Growers Association said last year that China would be treated as a special market and those wishing to export to China would have to register their orchards and apply cold steri-treatment to eradicate unwanted pests.

This is where the new Durban terminal is likely to come into its own, along with the existing Fresh Produce Terminal on the T-Jetty. Both terminals leave Durban well secured to maintain its position as southern Africa's principal citrus export port.
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Old April 20th, 2005, 11:11 PM   #8
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All aboard for island-hopping cruises

March 30, 2005

By Greg Ardé

KwaZulu-Natal property developer Mark Taylor will launch a Durban-based cruise business for leisure trips on the east coast of Africa from October.

Taylor, whose eLan Group is developing luxury residential estates in Ballito and the Midlands, has hooked up with one-time professional rugby player Trevor Boynton and a pair of European investors, Freddy van den Bergh and Frans de Ruyter.

Together, they have bought a "medium-sized" cruise ship with a shallow draft that will allow them to take passengers to many out-of-the way Indian Ocean islands.

Boynton, the Managing Director of Indian Ocean Cruises, said the vessel, to be known as MV Madagascar, had 93 cabins for 225 passengers and accommodation for 90 crew.

Formerly known as the Stella Maris II, the ship was bought for an undisclosed sum and has restaurants, bars, a disco, cabaret lounge, casino, hospital, shops and a swimming pool.

"The ship is air-conditioned and stabilised; all cabins have private facilities and wall-to-wall carpeting," said Boynton.


"The hospitality side of the business will be run by
SA-based hotel groups from Durban and the ship's home port will be Durban."

The ship will cruise between Madagascar and Kenya, Tanzania, Zanzibar, the Seychelles and Comores from May to October.

From November to April it will island-hop around Mozambique.

"The last year has been spent doing feasibility studies, based on Trade and Investment KZN's belief that there are opportunities in the cruise business.

"There is no company permanently servicing this area and we believe the fly-cruises have great potential," said Boynton.

He said his company would either offer cruises out of Durban, or packages that included flights from South Africa to the islands for holidays on the ship cruising between the islands.
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Old April 20th, 2005, 11:14 PM   #9
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Big ships steaming in

March 16, 2005

Just as soon as one large ship sails (see last week’s Ports & Shipping) so another is ready to appear over the horizon.

The latest record-breaking container ship to be heading our way is the German-owned Monte Rosa of the Hamburg Süd line, which was named at a ceremony in South Korea last Friday.

The big ship is now being readied to join three sister vessels on the Europe- South America East Coast service, where a further two newbuilds will later be added.

But what makes this ship of such significance to South African shipping and our ports in particular is that when she arrives in Durban on or about April 10 she will be carrying a cargo of containers.

Monte Rosa will thus become the first container ship with a capacity in excess of 5 000 TEUs (twenty-foot container equivalents) to call at the port – something few people thought either likely or possible so soon.

Monte Rosa carries up to 5 552 TEUs which is about 1 000 more than the new Safmarine/Maersk container ships and 600 more than those of P&O Nedlloyd Heemskerck, which called at Durban little more than a week ago.

A few years ago this would have made her the world’s largest container ship.
In this regard Monte Rosa’s dimensions will be of interest to Durban port people.


With an overall length of 272m and a beam of 40m the ship is about 3m wider than the new Safmarine/Maersk ships Nomazwe, Nokwanda and Lars Maersk that have entered service on the SAECS (SA-Europe) service. But Monte Rosa’s draught of 12.5m remains within Durban port limits although a tidal entry during daylight is likely.

While this may turn out to be the only Durban visit for this particular ship (Durban is a regular call for other Hamburg Süd vessels on the company’s Far East-South America service), what makes the call so significant is the demonstration that Durban can indeed handle such large ships even before the channel entrance is widened.

It also shows that such visits can be expected sooner rather than later.
The six new Hamburg Süd ships are in fact exceptionally large for Hamburg Süd’s Europe-South America East Coast service, where deploying them will bring about a considerable reduction of the number of ships needed for that service – from 16 to 12. At the current high operating costs, this equals huge savings for the company.

As the prefix to the name suggests, the new ships are all named for mountains or ranges in South America or Europe – Monte Rosa being the second highest massive in the Alps.
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Old April 24th, 2005, 10:31 PM   #10
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Harbour project delayed to 2007

SAMANTHA ENSLIN

Durban - Construction on the R1.5 billion project to widen and deepen the Durban harbour mouth, which was previously scheduled to begin this month, will now begin in 2007 for completion in 2010.

Small business owners, who run restaurants at the Point, have now been given a reprieve after being told last year to vacate the premises by March.

Pumi Motsoahae, the infrastructure manager of the National Port Authority, said: `The widening of the harbour mouth is going ahead. There will be a three-year construction period commencing 2007.`

Restaurant owners have now signed leases until February next year and have been given the option to extend the leases further.

The need to widen the harbour mouth is to cater for future growth in cargo volumes and to ensure that the port can accommodate larger vessels.

According to SA Port Operations, container growth at the Durban container terminal is forecast to increase to 3 million twenty foot equivalent units a year by 2012 from the current 1.4 million.

Motsoahae said projections last year that construction on the harbour mouth would begin this month were based on the understanding of the project then.

But business owners at the Point said confusion over when the project would begin and the lack of information from port authorities had hurt business.

Nickos Ipopoulos, the owner of Splashes, a restaurant overlooking the harbour mouth, said: `Last year in October patrons thought we had already vacated the premises and we had to advertise extensively to inform people otherwise. A lot businesses have already left.`

Bob Humphreys, the owner of Thirsty`s, said: `We have been left up in the air. Out of about 12 restaurants at the Point there are only four left.`

Motsoahae said the Transnet board has approved infrastructure development projects over the next five years, which included the entrance channel widening and deepening.
The paperwork for the project is in the process of being finalised for submission to Transnet. The prpject comprises various phases, one of which is the detailed design phase.

Work on the design will begin in June and will take just a under a year to complete. Thereafter tenders for the construction will be issued and adjudicated.

The widening of the harbour mouth is not the only project to improve the port`s capacity.

Extensions to the Durban container terminal, further work on the Point terminal and upgrades to the berths at the port`s petroleum cluster. Island View, are also on the cards.

The Rl.45 billion conversion of Pier 1 into a container handling facility is due to be completed in 2007, when the Durban port is expected to be handling 2 million twenty foot containers a year.

The new facility will increase Durban`s capacity by 600000 twenty foot equivalent units.

Rajen Chetty, the acting port engineer, said detailed design work was being done and construction would begin early next year.

The surfacing of the Point terminal will enable the migration of break bulk cargo, such as steel, from Pier 1 to the Point terminal.

At the Point terminal 20ha has already been reclaimed and the quay wall constructed. The surfacing will be done in three stages, and as the berths are completed they will be handed over to terminal operators.

Long-term plans to increase the Durban port`s container handling capacity include the conversion of Salisbury Island, where the navy is located.

Motsoahae said plans to reclaim the area between Pier 1 and Salisbury Island for container handling depended on an environmental impact assessment.

Upgrades at Island View will amount to R180 million. Work will begin in June this year and is expected to be completed in November 2007.

Private sector operators, which lease the land from the ports authority, will invest in equipment. The upgrade will include the construction of new quay walls at berths 5 and 6.
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Old May 15th, 2005, 12:39 PM   #11
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As was pointed out to me by SABOY in the durban visual thread in the skyline forum, these pics are a bit outdated for ushaka and the new quay wall arent complete,but they are the only overhead pics i could find of the port! If any of u guys know of any other/better ones, please put them up...
















Sailsbury Island is part of the port authorities long term growth plan and they expect to change it to container handling by 2009, by which stage the naval base will have to move somewhere else, but the problem is where...for space in the harbour is running out. Present new investment is at R9billion ($1,5billion) with futher expenditure planned on Maiden Whalf, the dry dock, and on the new cruise terminal which has been given the go ahead. it will include a proposed 20F+ tower above it.
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Old May 15th, 2005, 01:46 PM   #12
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tell me more about these proposed new towers, They keep poppoing out of the woodwork
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Old May 15th, 2005, 02:12 PM   #13
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the plan is to build the new cruise terminal directly across the road from san raphael. they also plan to utilise the space better, for a cruise terminal need not be very big at all. they are therefore planning to build a tower as part of the development and include commercial office space and residential apartments above the terminal. the terminal will be cross modal, in that it will also be the bus, taxi and monorial terminus for the point.

They also have grand plans for it to include a rail station, for there is a line that runs past. this line is connected to the present airport site and can easily be connected to the north-south rail line, so as to service the new la mercy airport. they intend to provide a rail service between the airport and the point, so as to offer arriving visitors an easier way to enter the city. the line already exists, all they will need to do is build a station at the point and one at the airport, and get new trains to service the line, so will not be nearly as costly as the gautrain plan in joburg. Seems like it could be a reality in the not too distant future.
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Old May 15th, 2005, 05:46 PM   #14
 
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Are terminals as such not so noisy? I think its great with all the mixed use and multi-purpose integration, but Im sure many people will not want to live accross a nooisy busy ship terminal. However, there is a good chance that it wont be so noisy.......I just didnt know if cruise ships are particularily loud.
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Old May 15th, 2005, 11:34 PM   #15
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dont forget that durban is not a cruise ship hub. there has only recently been cruise ships based here. The summer season will see 3 cruise ships based in durban and they have 24 other ships confirmed to visit. they are trying to encourage more and as such want to provide the right platform.

Regards noise, yeah if its a trans-modal point maybe a bit of noise, but the apartments will only be high up, if they put apartments in at all...wouldnt it be great if it was a purely commercial building...a new commercial tower...ahhhh
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Old May 16th, 2005, 07:50 AM   #16
 
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Yah it would. Thanx mate
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Old May 16th, 2005, 08:13 AM   #17
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hurry up durban I want to see more cranes, sounds like Durbs will have a sea of cranes not seen since the 70s
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Old May 18th, 2005, 09:52 PM   #18
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yip it will! and its possible that there will be an expansion to wilsons whalf next year...more restaurants and shops...plus a new development in the yacht mole...with floating restaurants, shops and another theatre
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Old May 24th, 2005, 06:42 PM   #19
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Mike, this sounds great! How much of a certainty is the new harbour development with the floating restaurants etc? I didn't think the harbour had any available space or that Wilson's Wharf could be expanded. More details please....
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Old May 24th, 2005, 08:23 PM   #20
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Wilsons Whalf is going to expand on the vacant land that you look out onto when u sit in zacks. Plans are for a Mugg and Bean, 2 more restuarants, a bar and 3 other stores.

The other development with the floating restaurants is a city backed project next to the Cafe Fish restaurant in the yacht mole. It will be on the side next to the yacht mole and on the other side that faces wilsons whalf.

Initially plans are for 3 restaurants, 2 coffee shops, a theatre and a niteclub...but with potential apartment development too.
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