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Old March 27th, 2010, 09:18 PM   #1321
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Originally Posted by MBRkhmer View Post
Hi friends, late me show you all about Ha noi,
most of the road are too small and house some short some tall and look something like no standard at all, you know most of the house in phnom penh at least 4m infront but in Hanoi some just about 2m only but their make it untill 5 floors or higher..! same like bambo tree.
But about satellite city yes..., phnom penh still far behind Hanoi and I can't count high building in Hanoi specially near BIG C super market. but Sai gon more deverloping than Ha noi too.
My opinion phnom penh will be better than Hanoi in the near future, because our old town design is very standard already since (Sang Kom Reas Niyum) and we just waiting for world economic become better than the satellite city will grow again.
some time i'm in Hanoi, Sai gon, Bangkok, or Singapore..but now staying near VN & China border. sorry for without post up pictures but you all can find it if you want. thanks!

Seems like you dont know much about Hanoi. There are alot of big road construction going on, satellite city constructions and supertalls. Hanoi is expanding its land therefore, soon central Hanoi will be located in the new expanded area. I dont think phnong penh can catch up with Hanoi in term of skylines. If your saying that in the future phnong penh will have better satellite city than Hanoi, by that time Hanoi is probably building way more modern satellite city than phnong penh. So the pattern here is that : you move up 1, I move up 1. therefore the ones behind cant really catch up. I'm saying this to all city not just Hanoi/Phnong Penh.

Here is the differences between Hanoi/ Phnong Penh.
HANOI:





HO CHI MINH CITY


AND THIS IS PHNONG PENH:


I dont hate Phnong Penh, in fact i would love to see your city develop so SEA countries wont have to look bad anymore. but what your saying is not true about Hanoi
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Old March 27th, 2010, 09:50 PM   #1322
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I feel sorry because of some unsuitable pic. in Cambodia's thread. You know, some vietnamese guys is used to have great pride about their city . And they are very sensitive when someone look down their hometown.
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Old March 27th, 2010, 09:59 PM   #1323
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I suggest we Cambodians stop compare Phnom Penh to any Vietnamese cities. We will never catch up with Vietnam. This is the fact!! We have 14 million people and Vietnam has 80+ million people. I don't mean to put our own people down, but Vietnam did not destroy their economy and their educational system like Pol Pot did. Our economy just started from scratch litterally. Also vietnamese people are among the most intelligent ones in the region. Just appreciate any Vietnamese investment in our country. It only helps our economy. Hopefully, we will be better in 30 years.
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Old March 27th, 2010, 10:11 PM   #1324
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Of cause the raod to satellite city sure big and nice but I said small are the raod in the old town and building no standard also there is not satellite city area.

I realize that Cambodia need to learn a lot of thing from VN.
I'm not critic any country and I said phnom penh far behind VN because most of foriengner investor are old in VN but very new in Cambodia.
So I believe when the world economic better they will be more coming Cambodia too most them are S Korean, Singaporean...so that phnom penh will be change.
And if VN grow up that's good for Cambodia too but if your country keep growing non-stop..,! So VN will be more rich than USA or China.,,??
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Old March 27th, 2010, 10:15 PM   #1325
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Whoahh!! How come there are soo many Youns here now! See what you did Ah Kvaa and AH Kdean! The Youn are going to come here and post pictures that aren't even related to this thread!

Last edited by Rudravarman; March 27th, 2010 at 11:30 PM.
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Old March 27th, 2010, 10:18 PM   #1326
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Originally Posted by MBRkhmer View Post
Of cause the raod to satellite city sure big and nice but I said small are the raod in the old town and building no standard also there is not satellite city area.

I realize that Cambodia need to learn a lot of thing from VN.
I'm not critic any country and I said phnom penh far behind VN because most of foriengner investor are old in VN but very new in Cambodia.
So I believe when the world economic better they will be more coming Cambodia too most them are S Korean, Singaporean...so that phnom penh will be change.
And if VN grow up that's good for Cambodia too but if your country keep growing non-stop..,! So VN will be more rich than USA or China.,,??
Stop comparing Phnom Penh to Vietnam's cities it's no match because their too rich! But I wouldn't brag either because you still got over 80 million to feed!
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Old March 27th, 2010, 10:22 PM   #1327
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Phnom Penh's recent development is really stunning, and I hope the city becomes more modern day by day. However, I fail to see the similarities between Phnom Penh and Hanoi. I think both belong to totally different type of cities.

to Viet members: please stop posting pics of Vietnamese cities in here. We are guests in here, so we should behave like guests.
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Last edited by tq; March 27th, 2010 at 10:27 PM.
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Old March 27th, 2010, 10:23 PM   #1328
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What's the rush of having too many skyscrapers if the city isn't yet ready infrastructurally? Who are those skyscrapers for if the demands aren't there yet? Be patient, the Great King Rudravarman of Providence! Development doesn't happen in one day.
This Viet troll can't take sarcasm lolz! He's piss for no reason even though this has nothing to do with him! Do you actually think I was being for real? I don't care if Phnom Penh have tall buildings it doesn't mean anything if it's not going to benefit the poor!
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Old March 27th, 2010, 10:26 PM   #1329
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Originally Posted by mspolis View Post
Please refrain from using bad words and calling people names in here if you would like other people to respect you. You will only show people what a stinky ******* you are if you don't.

Cambodians are civilized. So, please be so if you want to make your country and people proud.
Again don't get mad because I use the word "Youn"! It doesn't have any negative connotations at all! Your too sensitive dude! Loosen up!
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Old March 27th, 2010, 10:29 PM   #1330
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Originally Posted by Škyliner ↔ View Post
Seems like you dont know much about Hanoi. There are alot of big road construction going on, satellite city constructions and supertalls. Hanoi is expanding its land therefore, soon central Hanoi will be located in the new expanded area. I dont think phnong penh can catch up with Hanoi in term of skylines. If your saying that in the future phnong penh will have better satellite city than Hanoi, by that time Hanoi is probably building way more modern satellite city than phnong penh. So the pattern here is that : you move up 1, I move up 1. therefore the ones behind cant really catch up. I'm saying this to all city not just Hanoi/Phnong Penh.

Here is the differences between Hanoi/ Phnong Penh.
HANOI:





HO CHI MINH CITY


AND THIS IS PHNONG PENH:


I dont hate Phnong Penh, in fact i would love to see your city develop so SEA countries wont have to look bad anymore.
but what your saying is not true about Hanoi
AHAHAAHAHAHHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.... Dude I just wanna laugh soooooo hard! Do you actually know what race was the first to build the biggest and largest Metropolis on Earth!! I suggest you don't know much about us either!!

Last edited by Rudravarman; March 27th, 2010 at 10:36 PM.
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Old March 27th, 2010, 10:34 PM   #1331
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Originally Posted by tq View Post
Phnom Penh's recent development is really stunning, and I hope the city becomes more modern day by day. However, I fail to see the similarities between Phnom Penh and Hanoi. I think both belong to totally different type of cities.

to Viet members: please stop posting pics of Vietnamese cities in here. We are guests in here, so we should behave like guests.
Thank you!
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Old March 27th, 2010, 10:50 PM   #1332
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Originally Posted by Rudravarman View Post
AHAHAAHAHAHHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.... Dude I just wanna laugh soooooo hard! Do you actually know what race was the first to build the biggest and largest Metropolis on Earth!! I suggest you don't know much about us either!!
and u tell me which race that is, because the biggest Metropolis on Earth does not locate in Cambodia. SO is it you that don't understand about your own race or I?
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Old March 27th, 2010, 10:54 PM   #1333
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Originally Posted by Škyliner ↔ View Post
and u tell me which race that is, because the biggest Metropolis on Earth does not locate in Cambodia. SO is it you that don't understand about your own race or I?
Are you dumb! Look it up I don't have to tell you who first built the biggest city on Earth!
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Old March 27th, 2010, 11:00 PM   #1334
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Metropolis: Angkor, the world's first mega-city


The discovery that the famous Cambodian temple complex sits in the midst of a vast settlement the size of London, which flourished until the 15th century, has astounded archaeologists - but also baffled them: why did it disappear? By Kathy Marks




The huge sandstone temples of Angkor, built nearly 1,000 years ago and unearthed from the Cambodian jungle in the last century, are considered one of man's most outstanding architectural achievements. Last year more than a million tourists wandered through the ruins and watched the sun rise over the main temple's distinctive towering spires.

But, magnificent though the temple complex may be, it tells only part of the story of Angkor: a thriving metropolis, the world's first mega-city so mysteriously abandoned in the 15th century, and the former capital of the vast Khmer empire.

An international team of archaeologists has ascertained that the temple environs were just the core of a sprawling urban settlement that covered 700 square miles - a similar size to Greater London. They have spent 15 years mapping the area and putting together a picture of life in what is now established to have been the world's largest medieval city.

The "lost city of Angkor" was painstakingly uncovered by French archaeologists who spent much of the last century rescuing it from the forest and restoring it. Not surprisingly, they concentrated their efforts on the massive temples, which were built between the ninth and 13th centuries as monuments to the power and wealth of the Khmer kings. The rest of the region remained carpeted with vegetation, with few remnants of the ancient civilisation visible to the human eye at ground level.

A French, Cambodian and Australian team used aerial photographs, satellite imagery and high-resolution ground-sensing radar, provided by Nasa, to investigate what lay beneath the green cloak. What they found was the remains of 74 temples, as well as the sites of thousands of houses, roads, embankments, canals and ponds - all believed to have been part of an extensive, interconnected residential complex that included a large system of waterways. The team has just published its findings, together with a detailed map, in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a US journal.

Damian Evans, an Australian archaeologist who is deputy director of the Greater Angkor Project, said yesterday: "People never really considered Angkor as being much more than a scattering of temples in the landscape. In fact, it would have been a huge and popular city, full of life."

He and his colleagues report in their paper that, "even on a conservative estimate, greater Angkor at its peak was the world's most extensive pre-industrial low-density urban complex" - far larger than the ancient Mayan cities of central America, for instance, which covered 100 square miles at most. Mr Evans, who is based at the University of Sydney's archaeological computing library, said the Khmers of 1,000 years ago appear to have lived very similar lives to modern-day Cambodians. "They lived in clusters of houses on raised mounds to keep above the floodwaters in the wet season," he added.

"The mounds were in clusters, and scattered through them were these small village ponds. Between the houses were rice fields. And the core of this system was the village temple, in much the same way that Buddhist temples are the core of contemporary Cambodian communities."

The Khmer people subsisted on rice agriculture, just as many Cambodians still do, and the water management system - designed to trap water coming down the hills in the north - was partly used for irrigation, it is believed. The village ponds, from 25 to 60ft long, were used for drinking and domestic purposes during the dry season, as well as for watering livestock.

Mr Evans said the newly discovered temples, were not grand, like those at the heart of Angkor. Most now consist only of a pile of brick rubble, plus the occasional sandstone doorframe or pedestal, which once bore a statue. But while they hold little interest for tourists, they are valuable archaeological finds - and there are nearly 100 others out there, the team believes.

Mr Evans said the temples not only had a religious function, but were centres of taxation, education and water control. "So they can tell us about the everyday life at Angkor," he said.

A succession of Khmer kings ruled the Angkor area from about 800 AD, producing the architectural masterpieces and sculpture now preserved as a World Heritage site. By the 13th century the civilisation was in decline, and most of Angkor was abandoned by the early 15th century, apart from Angkor Wat, the main temple, which remained a Buddhist shrine. When the lost city - swallowed by the jungle for centuries - was rediscovered, archaeologists were, understandably, absorbed by the need to rescue and conserve the dozen or so main temples and their bas-relief carvings. Few excavations were carried out outside the temple precinct.

"No one really thought to look beyond them and into the broader landscape, to see how people actually lived," Mr Evans said.

By the 1960s it was clear that rich archaeological pickings lay beyond the walled city. A programme was put in place to investigate the wider area, but never got off the ground because of civil war, followed by the advent of the Khmer Rouge and Pol Pot's murderous regime. It was not until the 1990s that the security situation improved, enabling work to resume. But when the international mapping team started their project, they still needed an armed escort for protection in certain areas. And even now, Mr Evans said he never steps off marked paths, because of the risk posed by unexploded landmines.

Until now, Angkor was never looked at as an extended urban area. The city was thought to consist of the central walled precinct, covering about one square mile, where tens of thousands of people lived. "No one really considered the fact that there might be an urban fabric that stretched between and beyond the temples of Angkor," Mr Evans said.

The settlement mapped by the team existed from AD500 to AD1500, and could have supported a population of up to one million people. But some of the terrain may have been sparsely populated, particularly in outlying areas. "Now we have the map, we can quantify this residential space," Mr Evans said.

"We can start to do proper demographic studies and work out how many people were living on these mounds. But we can say now, from a preliminary point of view, that it would have had a population of several hundred thousand, at least."

The city was criss-crossed by roadways and canals, and was similar to modern cities that suffer from urban sprawl. Mr Evans said: "It had the same sort of dense core and pattern of spreading out into rural areas."

The team may also have found the key to Angkor's collapse - or, at least, confirmed an existing theory: that the city "built itself out of existence". Mr Evans said: "The water management system, in particular, had the potential to create some very serious environmental problems and radically remodel the landscape. You can see the city pushing into forested areas, stripping vegetation and re-engineering the landscape into something that was completely artificial.

"The city was certainly big enough, and the agricultural exploitation was intensive enough, to have impacted on the environment. Angkor would have suffered from the same problems as contemporary low-density cities, in terms of pressure on the infrastructure, and poor management of natural resources like water. But they had limited technology to deal with these problems and failed to, ultimately, perhaps."

The team also found evidence of embankments that had been breached, and of ad hoc repairs to bridges and dams, suggesting that the water system had become unmanageable over time. Mr Evans said over-population, deforestation, topsoil erosion and degradation, with subsequent sedimenation or flooding, could have been disastrous for medieval residents.

Excavations in the next few years will examine the theory in more detail, and try to gather more data, for instance, on sedimentation in the canals.

The radar images provided by Nasa distinguished the contours of the landscape under the surface of the earth, identifying the location of roads and canals. The radar also showed up different levels of soil moisture in the rice fields. When excavations were carried out, they proved to have been the site of a canal or temple moat. The new archaeological evidence will pose a challenge for conservationists, as the current World Heritage site covers 150 square miles, which are intensively managed and protected.

Cambodian authorities, meanwhile, are grappling with the problem of how to preserve the precious ruins within the temple precinct from increasing numbers of visitors. Just 7,600 people ventured to Angkor in 1993, when it was added to Unesco's World Heritage list. Since then, with Cambodia becoming accepted as a "safe" destination, tourism has boomed. The government is expecting three million visitors in 2010, and many of those will head to the temples. Angkor Wat is now one of south-east Asia's leading attractions.

Tourism, which brought impoverished Cambodia $1.5bn (Ł750m) in revenue last year, is helping the country to rebuild after its long dark period. But Soeung Kong, deputy director-general of the Aspara Authority, which oversees Angkor's upkeep, told Agence France Press recently: "The harm to the temples is unavoidable when many people walk in and out of them. We are trying to keep that harm at a minimal level."

Teruo Jinnai, Unesco's senior official in Cambodia, said: "When you have such a huge mass of tourists visiting, then we are concerned about damage to the heritage site and the temples and the monuments. Many temples are very fragile."

The main problem lies in Siem Reap, the nearby town that has mushroomed in recent years to accommodate the growing numbers of tourists. There are more than 250 guesthouses and hotels, and they have been sucking up groundwater and destabilising the earth beneath Angkor. At least one monument, the Bayon temple, famous for the serene faces carved on its 54 towers, is collapsing into the sandy ground - a development confirmed by its sinking foundations, and widening cracks between its carefully carved stones.
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Old March 27th, 2010, 11:06 PM   #1335
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Don't talk about South East Asia because you guys are not south east Asian in the first place! See even Dubai is using the Angkor urban planning for their skyscraper development!


Last edited by Rudravarman; March 27th, 2010 at 11:20 PM.
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Old March 28th, 2010, 12:04 AM   #1336
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i think cambodia has more population than that...
especially because TONS live out of country.
for example japan, US, australia, Germany, Switz, England, France
ETC.
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Old March 28th, 2010, 12:14 AM   #1337
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tq View Post
Phnom Penh's recent development is really stunning, and I hope the city becomes more modern day by day. However, I fail to see the similarities between Phnom Penh and Hanoi. I think both belong to totally different type of cities.

to Viet members: please stop posting pics of Vietnamese cities in here. We are guests in here, so we should behave like guests.


Some of us will appreciate seeing pictures of Vietnamese cities. Seeing what is happening in Vietnam will motivate some of us to look up to Vietnam and hopefully use Vietnamese development as the model to follow.
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Old March 28th, 2010, 01:34 AM   #1338
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Youn isn"t an offensive word unless you really mean it. It has been used for over 2000 years and not only Khmer but Thai, Lao and Chinese(Yuenan) use it.
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Old March 28th, 2010, 01:41 AM   #1339
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Not only Angkor Wat or other temples but Cambodia very rich in natural resources,
such as petrol, gold...but we not yet use it.
As long as the world keep moving anything in the world also can change,
Cambodia use to be strong.. (Khmer empire)
Cambodia use to be poor... .( killing field)
so what I saying nothing that can't change in this world,
maybe in one day Cambodia run faster,, who know.., maybe in this generation.,,'!
Most country that economy growing fast it never take 100years but can be 10years as long as goverment move on the right direction only..
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Old March 28th, 2010, 02:05 AM   #1340
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudravarman View Post

Metropolis: Angkor, the world's first mega-city


The discovery that the famous Cambodian temple complex sits in the midst of a vast settlement the size of London, which flourished until the 15th century, has astounded archaeologists - but also baffled them: why did it disappear? By Kathy Marks




The huge sandstone temples of Angkor, built nearly 1,000 years ago and unearthed from the Cambodian jungle in the last century, are considered one of man's most outstanding architectural achievements. Last year more than a million tourists wandered through the ruins and watched the sun rise over the main temple's distinctive towering spires.

But, magnificent though the temple complex may be, it tells only part of the story of Angkor: a thriving metropolis, the world's first mega-city so mysteriously abandoned in the 15th century, and the former capital of the vast Khmer empire.

An international team of archaeologists has ascertained that the temple environs were just the core of a sprawling urban settlement that covered 700 square miles - a similar size to Greater London. They have spent 15 years mapping the area and putting together a picture of life in what is now established to have been the world's largest medieval city.

The "lost city of Angkor" was painstakingly uncovered by French archaeologists who spent much of the last century rescuing it from the forest and restoring it. Not surprisingly, they concentrated their efforts on the massive temples, which were built between the ninth and 13th centuries as monuments to the power and wealth of the Khmer kings. The rest of the region remained carpeted with vegetation, with few remnants of the ancient civilisation visible to the human eye at ground level.

A French, Cambodian and Australian team used aerial photographs, satellite imagery and high-resolution ground-sensing radar, provided by Nasa, to investigate what lay beneath the green cloak. What they found was the remains of 74 temples, as well as the sites of thousands of houses, roads, embankments, canals and ponds - all believed to have been part of an extensive, interconnected residential complex that included a large system of waterways. The team has just published its findings, together with a detailed map, in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a US journal.

Damian Evans, an Australian archaeologist who is deputy director of the Greater Angkor Project, said yesterday: "People never really considered Angkor as being much more than a scattering of temples in the landscape. In fact, it would have been a huge and popular city, full of life."

He and his colleagues report in their paper that, "even on a conservative estimate, greater Angkor at its peak was the world's most extensive pre-industrial low-density urban complex" - far larger than the ancient Mayan cities of central America, for instance, which covered 100 square miles at most. Mr Evans, who is based at the University of Sydney's archaeological computing library, said the Khmers of 1,000 years ago appear to have lived very similar lives to modern-day Cambodians. "They lived in clusters of houses on raised mounds to keep above the floodwaters in the wet season," he added.

"The mounds were in clusters, and scattered through them were these small village ponds. Between the houses were rice fields. And the core of this system was the village temple, in much the same way that Buddhist temples are the core of contemporary Cambodian communities."

The Khmer people subsisted on rice agriculture, just as many Cambodians still do, and the water management system - designed to trap water coming down the hills in the north - was partly used for irrigation, it is believed. The village ponds, from 25 to 60ft long, were used for drinking and domestic purposes during the dry season, as well as for watering livestock.

Mr Evans said the newly discovered temples, were not grand, like those at the heart of Angkor. Most now consist only of a pile of brick rubble, plus the occasional sandstone doorframe or pedestal, which once bore a statue. But while they hold little interest for tourists, they are valuable archaeological finds - and there are nearly 100 others out there, the team believes.

Mr Evans said the temples not only had a religious function, but were centres of taxation, education and water control. "So they can tell us about the everyday life at Angkor," he said.

A succession of Khmer kings ruled the Angkor area from about 800 AD, producing the architectural masterpieces and sculpture now preserved as a World Heritage site. By the 13th century the civilisation was in decline, and most of Angkor was abandoned by the early 15th century, apart from Angkor Wat, the main temple, which remained a Buddhist shrine. When the lost city - swallowed by the jungle for centuries - was rediscovered, archaeologists were, understandably, absorbed by the need to rescue and conserve the dozen or so main temples and their bas-relief carvings. Few excavations were carried out outside the temple precinct.

"No one really thought to look beyond them and into the broader landscape, to see how people actually lived," Mr Evans said.

By the 1960s it was clear that rich archaeological pickings lay beyond the walled city. A programme was put in place to investigate the wider area, but never got off the ground because of civil war, followed by the advent of the Khmer Rouge and Pol Pot's murderous regime. It was not until the 1990s that the security situation improved, enabling work to resume. But when the international mapping team started their project, they still needed an armed escort for protection in certain areas. And even now, Mr Evans said he never steps off marked paths, because of the risk posed by unexploded landmines.

Until now, Angkor was never looked at as an extended urban area. The city was thought to consist of the central walled precinct, covering about one square mile, where tens of thousands of people lived. "No one really considered the fact that there might be an urban fabric that stretched between and beyond the temples of Angkor," Mr Evans said.

The settlement mapped by the team existed from AD500 to AD1500, and could have supported a population of up to one million people. But some of the terrain may have been sparsely populated, particularly in outlying areas. "Now we have the map, we can quantify this residential space," Mr Evans said.

"We can start to do proper demographic studies and work out how many people were living on these mounds. But we can say now, from a preliminary point of view, that it would have had a population of several hundred thousand, at least."

The city was criss-crossed by roadways and canals, and was similar to modern cities that suffer from urban sprawl. Mr Evans said: "It had the same sort of dense core and pattern of spreading out into rural areas."

The team may also have found the key to Angkor's collapse - or, at least, confirmed an existing theory: that the city "built itself out of existence". Mr Evans said: "The water management system, in particular, had the potential to create some very serious environmental problems and radically remodel the landscape. You can see the city pushing into forested areas, stripping vegetation and re-engineering the landscape into something that was completely artificial.

"The city was certainly big enough, and the agricultural exploitation was intensive enough, to have impacted on the environment. Angkor would have suffered from the same problems as contemporary low-density cities, in terms of pressure on the infrastructure, and poor management of natural resources like water. But they had limited technology to deal with these problems and failed to, ultimately, perhaps."

The team also found evidence of embankments that had been breached, and of ad hoc repairs to bridges and dams, suggesting that the water system had become unmanageable over time. Mr Evans said over-population, deforestation, topsoil erosion and degradation, with subsequent sedimenation or flooding, could have been disastrous for medieval residents.

Excavations in the next few years will examine the theory in more detail, and try to gather more data, for instance, on sedimentation in the canals.

The radar images provided by Nasa distinguished the contours of the landscape under the surface of the earth, identifying the location of roads and canals. The radar also showed up different levels of soil moisture in the rice fields. When excavations were carried out, they proved to have been the site of a canal or temple moat. The new archaeological evidence will pose a challenge for conservationists, as the current World Heritage site covers 150 square miles, which are intensively managed and protected.

Cambodian authorities, meanwhile, are grappling with the problem of how to preserve the precious ruins within the temple precinct from increasing numbers of visitors. Just 7,600 people ventured to Angkor in 1993, when it was added to Unesco's World Heritage list. Since then, with Cambodia becoming accepted as a "safe" destination, tourism has boomed. The government is expecting three million visitors in 2010, and many of those will head to the temples. Angkor Wat is now one of south-east Asia's leading attractions.

Tourism, which brought impoverished Cambodia $1.5bn (Ł750m) in revenue last year, is helping the country to rebuild after its long dark period. But Soeung Kong, deputy director-general of the Aspara Authority, which oversees Angkor's upkeep, told Agence France Press recently: "The harm to the temples is unavoidable when many people walk in and out of them. We are trying to keep that harm at a minimal level."

Teruo Jinnai, Unesco's senior official in Cambodia, said: "When you have such a huge mass of tourists visiting, then we are concerned about damage to the heritage site and the temples and the monuments. Many temples are very fragile."

The main problem lies in Siem Reap, the nearby town that has mushroomed in recent years to accommodate the growing numbers of tourists. There are more than 250 guesthouses and hotels, and they have been sucking up groundwater and destabilising the earth beneath Angkor. At least one monument, the Bayon temple, famous for the serene faces carved on its 54 towers, is collapsing into the sandy ground - a development confirmed by its sinking foundations, and widening cracks between its carefully carved stones.


Dude,

Stop smoking whatever you are smoking!!
Wake up and smile the coffee!! This is not 2000 years ago.
You can not live in the past. We can not change the past.
Lets move on to what is ahead for all of us.
STOP SMOKING, OKAY!!!
kvaaa no está en línea   Reply With Quote


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