daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture > Classic Architecture

Classic Architecture Discussions on heritage buildings, monuments and landmarks.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old June 30th, 2008, 04:33 AM   #1
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 693
Likes (Received): 1461

New traditional religious structures in the United States


Quite impressive for new structures I have to say. Nice to see this work still being done.
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 11th, 2009, 12:12 AM   #2
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 693
Likes (Received): 1461

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church - Indiana




Quote:
Peter Crist

Landmark Church is built in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Founded nearly 100 years ago, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church of Indianapolis is building a new church complex in neighboring Carmel to meet its growing needs. The new temple establishes architectural and theological history by utilizing a design that has never been seen before in an Orthodox Church. Named by its designer Christ J. Kamages AIA Architect, this innovative paradigm is called the "Triad." In its quest for a new home, Father Anstasios Gounaris, Dr. Dennis Dickos (President) and Tony Filis (Building Committee Chair) , together with Mr. Kamages and his team at CJK Design Group, have lead the way for the parish designing with dedication, innovation and ingenuity towards fulfilling their goals and their vision for the future.

During its 2,000 year history, the Orthodox Church has developed a set of theologically-driven architectural principles that guide the faithful in the construction of houses of worship. Historically, however, the last major innovation in Orthodox Architecture occurred in the 6th Century when, after only 5 short years of construction, Justinian the 2nd and Patriarch Menas consecrated the Great Church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (today's Istanbul) on December 27, 537.

At that point in history, civilization had never before witnessed an inner sacred space such as that one. Fusing together great size and a holistic spiritual ethos, the Great Church of the Holy Wisdom is a tremendously large space that could accommodate over 4,000 people and would today hold a 14-story contemporary office tower under its 183 foot high dome. Yet, this light-filled building also embodies all the rudiments of an architectural language that carried through into later Christian and Muslim architecture. The majesty of Hagia Sophia continued to inspire, from the 9th Century Pre-Romanesque to the 12th -- 15th C. Gothic Architecture such as the Cathedrals of Salisbury, Chartres and Notre Dame, to the Renaissance masterpieces of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome by Bramante and Michelangelo and Brunelleschi's Florentine Duomo, some 1,100 years later. Following the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453, the Ottoman Moslems copied the architectural style of the Great Church for mosques in Istanbul and throughout the Islamic world.

Now in America's Heartland, 1,400 years after Hagia Sophia's completion, Holy Trinity is in the process of creating a new chapter in history with their beautiful new temple. Developed as an original prototype of ecclesiastical design within the centrally-oriented family of the Great Church of Hagia Sophia, it is comprised of historical elements and ancient precepts yet is a fresh, new design. The key elements still include the traditional Dome, Arches, Vaults and Exedras, (which have existed since the 3rd Century), but have NEVER been drawn or built in the Triad Configuration. Based on its unique, inventive and symbolic features, CJK Design has registered and copyrighted the Triad Prototype with the Library of Congress and is in the process of being patented.

The central core of the concept is a triangulated plan where the triangle symbolizes the nucleus of the faith, the Holy Trinity. The triangle then has "clipped "corners creating 3 major edges and 3 minor edges. Each edge has either a vaulted niche or Exedra with a Central Dome as the dominant element. The nave then has 6 total edges, one side for each day in the week with the Dome as the seventh (or Sunday). The dome is symbolic of Heaven and eternity, circular with no beginning and no end, as well as the aperture which allows the true Light, light from heaven above, to enter the nave. Like the dome of Hagia Sophia, numerous windows encircle the base. In this design, twenty arched windows will allow the natural daylight to pour into the temple. Like a beacon, the dome exterior will reflect golden light with a gleaming metal roof.

The assemblage provides a unique synthesis that creates:

* Both grandeur and intimacy in the same space.
* A sense of "Oneness" as the "Body of Christ" in worship or the "work of the people."
* Extraordinary sightlines throughout the space.
* A proportional and democratic positioning of the dome as the major interior and exterior element.
* A wide face towards the sanctuary (Hagia Bema) providing great visual access and liturgical arts flexibility
* Intimacy due to the maximum 70 feet the furthest seat is from the sanctuary.

CJK DESIGN GROUP, together with local contractor Sheil Sexton, has worked to bring to fruition this complex master plan at 106th and Shelborne streets in Carmel. Along with the easterly facing temple, there are plans to add a dining and recreation facility, classrooms, offices, a founders' walk and other support spaces that will serve this vibrant community in the future.

Scheduled to be finished early September 2008, the 25,375 sq. ft. first phase of construction includes the temple, the founders' walk and an administration building. The administrative component will house the offices of the parish priest and secretary along with other offices, a conference room and all the necessary functions. As an indoor atrium-like space connecting the temple to the administrative building, the founders' walk will serve as a gathering space for the community's after service coffee hour, dinners and other social needs. Together, they will support the church in their growing mission.

For now, the temple portion is under construction. The 52' diameter dome is one of the largest Orthodox domes in the Western Hemisphere. It now sits mostly constructed on the ground and is scheduled to be raised to its ultimate height of 65' above the ground on December 27, 2007 (coincidentally the 1,470th anniversary of the consecration of Hagia Sophia). After that, the building will be enclosed, with the brick walls, metal roofing, parking and the rest of the planned first phase soon to follow. With over 550 families, the large parish in the words of its leadership hopes that, "God willing, Holy Trinity will continue to serve our congregation, our children, the greater Indianapolis community, and central Indiana from larger, improved facilities that are architecturally conducive to Orthodox worship."

"The Triad Church of the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church raises its Great Gold Dome as we approach Christ's Birth ... the Light of Lights and Son of Suns ... It becomes the pinnacle of the Church Temple ... gathering light during the course of time in the interior ... and Reflecting and projecting light on the exterior as a witness and lighthouse of the True Faith ... Now and for the ages to come."

http://www.orthodoxytoday.org/articl...ristChurch.php
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2009, 02:44 PM   #3
Huti
bitte spiel mir etwas
 
Huti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 4,639
Likes (Received): 19976

wow, nice
__________________
"Do not take life too seriously. You will never get out of it alive." Elbert Hubbard
Huti no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2009, 02:45 PM   #4
ch1le
always on
 
ch1le's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: tallinn/Tartu
Posts: 4,650
Likes (Received): 203

wow, not nice.
ch1le no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 7th, 2012, 01:48 PM   #5
tommolo
Registered User
 
tommolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Milano
Posts: 5,043
Likes (Received): 3601

wow, the first one nice
wow, the second one not nice!
tommolo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2012, 12:28 AM   #6
Dimethyltryptamine
Registered User
 
Dimethyltryptamine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 12,880
Likes (Received): 6445

they do look fairly gaudy.
Dimethyltryptamine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2012, 02:41 AM   #7
Gherkin
actual gherkin
 
Gherkin's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: London
Posts: 13,796
Likes (Received): 515

Why aren't we designing for the 21st Century? They both look tacky, a bit Disneyland. They could have designed a nice modern church on the same budget.
Gherkin no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2012, 09:41 PM   #8
socrates#1fan
Registered User
 
socrates#1fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 2,605
Likes (Received): 1318

Errrr I didn't realize that somehow it being the 21st century erased thousands of years of tradition and history...

People would rather worship in a structure designed with tradition and beauty in mind than worship inside a giant water heater.

I love the first two. Both are stunning and will be landmarks in this nation for centuries to come. The orthodox church is nice too, could use more detail, but it contributes to the overall architecture of Indianapolis nonetheless. I do have to admit, I wish the first two were being built in Indianapolis instead. :P
__________________
"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." -Benjamin Franklin

"I don’t know what it is about Hoosiers, but wherever you go there is always a Hoosier doing something very important there."-Kurt Vonnegut
socrates#1fan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2012, 05:10 AM   #9
tommolo
Registered User
 
tommolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Milano
Posts: 5,043
Likes (Received): 3601

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gherkin View Post
Why aren't we designing for the 21st Century? They both look tacky, a bit Disneyland. They could have designed a nice modern church on the same budget.
Well Duncan Stroik church is fully contemporary classical architecture, look at the light scheme and the harmonical proportions: it is contemporary as today's newspaper! It has received very favourable critics also in the more modernist architectural reviews.

At the end, who knows what "contemporary" means nowadays? The fact you take the "looks like disneyland" phrase as a critics makes me think you're rather modernist as approact and you've matured a "nosthalgic" architectural taste, and so you've never accepted Eighties or the Venturi's post modern motto; "learn from Las Vegas!".

In that case, please let me show our youngsters' aesthetical sensibility. We do not care at all mixing styles. We've grown up in a time of complete relativeness of values, we have no moral dogmas, we have no imperatives like "we have to go further, to progress, to industrialize a little bit more, to automatize a little bit more, to inhumanize a little bit more". I have born when post modernism was already a declining movement, do you really think that we can see timpanum or colums like an idea linked to past or a "false historical product"?

Relativism is a founding aspect of contemporary society. Why shouldn't be there a style relativism as long as a race, taste, religion or sex relativism?

No. We live today. We want beauty, we get it where we most like it, that is through classical beauty. It's not our fault, if XX century modernist architecture was better we would have no problem and we would be the first purchasing it. We do not care if it's true or false beauty, we choose the best product. That is, classical aesthetics being built todays, actualized like Duncan Stroik does. Welcome to XXI sensibility, Gherkin.

Last edited by tommolo; January 11th, 2012 at 05:16 AM.
tommolo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2012, 05:28 AM   #10
tommolo
Registered User
 
tommolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Milano
Posts: 5,043
Likes (Received): 3601

And one last thing. People thinks that classicism and decorative styles have grown weary and have fallen out of fashon somehow. No way, that's a false myth. Classical harmony have purposedly being elaborated to have no temporal limits of beauty.

What happened, then?

Well, the father of modernism, Mies Van Der Rohe, said that decoration or classical architecture must be suspended for some time because at the time there was an emergency: people needed cheap houses in cities to live in. It was a social emergency. So Mies elaborated a docrine that worked very well in XX century: suspend architecture and start home design. In that way, they managed to produce economical houses: that was the full success of modernism. It required the motto "less is more" and the suspension of every decoration in order to reduce the cost of houses. But it worked.

Nowadays we have no longer problems of scarcity of houses, we have a problem of too many badly built concrete structure. We have an emergency of sustainability an lasting emergency today. And classical style it's freaking lasting, as we all know. The project Mies Van Der Rohe elaborated was correct, but it has been created to be a temporal patch to an emergency, not a new style whatsoever. They actually said (and written) that they would be suspending architecture for a while in order to solve the emergency. Nowadays there is no longer that emergency. We have no reason not to start again our research of classical shapes and decorations. They've never became out of fashon, really. They have just temporarily being suspended.

Yet the decorations, shapes and so on must not be a mere reproduction of the past. No, they must be a step further, somehing artistically originally. But we need to move over, and architects today must understand that nineties software like CAD that led them to build twisting cubes are outdated: nowadays we the youngsters use grat technologies like Wacom Bamboo pen tablet running with a full handmade Linux OS. We are back to the beauty of drawing, yet in our own fully contemporary way.

Let say once and for all a thing. Honesty and falsity belongs to Moral science. Beauty and ugliness belongs to architectural sciences. There might not be never ever an ugly morality or a beautiful morality, like there might never be an honest architecture or a fake or false architecture. It's not possibile any exchange or contact between morality or architecture. There are just ugly or beautiful buildings.

Last edited by tommolo; January 11th, 2012 at 05:34 AM.
tommolo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2012, 06:01 AM   #11
CF221
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Miami, Fl
Posts: 1,770
Likes (Received): 811

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gherkin View Post
Why aren't we designing for the 21st Century? They both look tacky, a bit Disneyland. They could have designed a nice modern church on the same budget.
You really don't know your architecture when you label everything that's classical as "disneylike."
__________________
Non nobis Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
CF221 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu