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Old April 12th, 2010, 01:24 AM   #1561
Abhishek901
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You don't have any official source to confirm, like the metro's website ?
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Old April 12th, 2010, 01:43 AM   #1562
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Great news, pictures and info guys thanks. And cudos to Shanghai. 2008 was the year of Beijing, 2010 will be Shanghai' s
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Old April 12th, 2010, 06:13 AM   #1563
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Quote:
Originally Posted by staff View Post

big-dog,

You're in Shanghai now?

Great line-- can't wait to try it!
yes I'm in Shanghai. I took the new line 10 to office this morning The interchanging is not very smooth (line 1 to line 10), it took me 6 minutes to find the line 10 entrance. But the facility is better, new touch screen is impressive!

Pics by wqeye of http://club.metrofans.sh.cn













touch screen map



Nanjing East Lu station



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Old April 12th, 2010, 01:45 PM   #1564
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Love the station art! How does the new touch screen map work? I haven't heard about it before.
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Old April 13th, 2010, 02:51 AM   #1565
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Its the XXL iPad :O
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Old April 13th, 2010, 07:53 AM   #1566
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Here's a big question: I notice in the photos of metros from other Chinese cities they use the fare gates with the gates that retract when you swipe your card, yet in Shanghai they are STILL using the much less convenient (especially when you've got big luggage) ones with the actual metal turnstile. Why is this?
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Old April 13th, 2010, 11:27 AM   #1567
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image hosted on flickr


They need to put some railings along the corridor. Are the width of the trains of the wider dimension? Normally, I can see the up and down escalators to the platform, with stair cases in between. But sometimes they just have up escalator with staircase beside, but no down escalators, why is that? Do they have elevators at most stations?

Last edited by maldini; April 13th, 2010 at 11:33 AM.
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Old April 13th, 2010, 12:16 PM   #1568
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Most stations have escalators but only a few have both-way escalators -- a majority of them only have upward escalators installed. I guess space and cost are main factors.
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Old April 13th, 2010, 07:23 PM   #1569
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Continue on discussions by previous posts regarding Shanghai metro's planning. As I known, Shanghai's latest metro network planning has some major changes, comparing to the previous version done around 2000 (with involvement of French experts). The 2000 version consists of R (Regional), M (Metro), and L (Light Rail) lines, among which R is copied from the RER of Paris. However, during one decade's building, border of three categories disappeared and the new plan totally abandoned this old concept.

The real reason behind it is Shanghai's very fast urbanization. A new consensus is that the whole Shanghai suburban (except for Chongming Island) will be urbanized in future. Future Shanghai will have a cluster of new city centers (or new towns). At least 3-4 of them (Jiading, Songjiang and Lucaogang) will have more than one million of population. Between these new downtowns, there will be low-density residential area, industrial area and greens.

As a result, the metro system's focus has moved from the old downtown to these new towns. The R/M/L system and suburban railways are replaced by a single but huge metro network, with some "fast lines" inside. For example, the line 2 extension to PVG has a last minute design change that put most of the route to underground. New lines, even they are located in today's "remote" suburban, are designed to be underground. For example the Line 20 and 21 will have long underground sections in the "remote" Qinpu, Huinan and Lucaogang area.

So, if we talk about Shanghai, think differently.
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Old April 14th, 2010, 12:04 AM   #1570
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abhishek901 View Post
Though tram should not be included but I think maglev should be included. It is a metro, though as faster one.
I wouldn't agree with that. Shanghai's Maglev serves a whole different purpose to the ordinary metro lines and the ticketing structure is completely different. One wouldn't count Heathrow Express as London's metro (Underground) network for the same reason.

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All in all it seems Shanghai is about to stay the largest metro system for a very long time to come... perhaps for the rest of our lifetimes at the very least.
I wouldn't get ahead of ourselves just yet ... London will have the Overground (at least ELL and SLL), Thameslink and Crossrail by 2017, all with metro characteristics. Of course Shanghai's metro network will still grow (with line 14 being the next major scheme I believe), but the pace is expected to slow significantly as money is tight after the Expo.
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Old April 14th, 2010, 12:56 AM   #1571
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Quote:
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I wouldn't get ahead of ourselves just yet ... London will have the Overground (at least ELL and SLL), Thameslink and Crossrail by 2017, all with metro characteristics. Of course Shanghai's metro network will still grow (with line 14 being the next major scheme I believe), but the pace is expected to slow significantly as money is tight after the Expo.
No way, you are NOT saying that London could be a match to London in terms of system size in the future, are you . Such an argument fails instantly. Why not to add the suburban rail which also has "metro characteristics" in some instances? Let's just be realistic.

The reality is that by 2020 or so Shanghai will have a system twice the size of London. By then Beijing and perhaps some other Chinese cities will have larger systems.
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Old April 14th, 2010, 01:36 AM   #1572
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Most Londoners couldn't care less if the Shanghai Metro is longer than the London Underground, me included. It only makes sense that it's longer considering the comparative sizes of the cities populations. In fact, Londoners should be proud to have had such a long network for a relatively small city for so long. Anyway, what matters most is the efficiency of the network and how well it caters to the city at hand. The Moscow or Paris Metros serve their cities well despite the fact that they're far shorter than both LU and the Shanghai Metro.
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Old April 14th, 2010, 02:18 AM   #1573
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
Most Londoners couldn't care less if the Shanghai Metro is longer than the London Underground, me included. It only makes sense that it's longer considering the comparative sizes of the cities populations. In fact, Londoners should be proud to have had such a long network for a relatively small city for so long. Anyway, what matters most is the efficiency of the network and how well it caters to the city at hand. The Moscow or Paris Metros serve their cities well despite the fact that they're far shorter than both LU and the Shanghai Metro.
Well, nobody has said that Shanghai metro has become better than London Underground (in terms of coverage). People are just saying that Shanghai metro has become world's largest metro, which is a fact and cannot be argued upon. Whether such length is sufficient for Shanghai or not is a different issues and should not be mixed with this.

London Underground may be serving London better than Shanghai metro but that was not our topic of discussion. People are just happy because a new milestone has been created, that's it. Your point thus seems to be out of context.
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Old April 14th, 2010, 03:07 AM   #1574
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Quote:
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Most Londoners couldn't care less if the Shanghai Metro is longer than the London Underground, me included.
When you put it like that it does indeed sound like you care after all...
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Old April 14th, 2010, 03:31 AM   #1575
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Complexes complexes...
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Old April 14th, 2010, 09:56 AM   #1576
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When you put it like that it does indeed sound like you care after all...
Well said.
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Old April 14th, 2010, 12:57 PM   #1577
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pansori View Post
No way, you are NOT saying that London could be a match to London in terms of system size in the future, are you . Such an argument fails instantly. Why not to add the suburban rail which also has "metro characteristics" in some instances? Let's just be realistic.

The reality is that by 2020 or so Shanghai will have a system twice the size of London. By then Beijing and perhaps some other Chinese cities will have larger systems.
In the narrowest definitions of Metro (or Underground or whatever brand name) Shanghai probably will remain no. 1 for a very long time. However the upgraded lines of the East London Line, Thameslink and most Importantly Crossrail will become metro services in all but name (simple service patterns, more than 6 tph, TfL style management). While existing commuter rail lines are certainly considered NR by travellers, I very much think these 3 new lines will be considered TfL lines. I'd also class the fast expanding DLR as part of the core metro network. These lines add up to a considerable length. Just consider this - the old ELL was no doubt a Tube line. Now it's been transferred over the Overground and having its services vastly improved, are we now actually going to discount it?

In Shanghai, by 2015 new lines 12, 13, 21 and 22 will be up and running. Now line 21, whilst managed by Shanghai Metro, will actually be a commuter line in all but name (only goes as far as Longyang Road, more complex service patterns, frequency below 6tph). Line 22 (the Jinshan Line) isn't technically part of the Metro network, as it'll be managed by the Railway Bureau and use mainline stock and ticketing structure, but the commuter purpose it serves makes people think of it as a city line. Would you include 21 and 22 in your total track length statistics for Shanghai?

In any case, the combined Tokyo urban rail systems dwarfs both London and shanghai by quite a margin.
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Old April 14th, 2010, 01:19 PM   #1578
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The thing is that we haven't talked about "definitions" at all here. It has simply been claimed that Shanghai Metro (the system-- not various forms of rails that might be defined as "metro") has surpassed the London Underground (the LU system-- not all metro-like rail in London) in length and become the largest single metro system on the planet. In this sense, I think it is unlikely that Shanghai Metro will be surpassed in any foreseeable future.

Of course, if we're including all metro-like rail, Tokyo wins by a margin. But then again-- in that case we wouldn't even have introduced the fact that the Shanghai Metro is the world's longest in the first place. So that discussion is quite irrelevant.
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Old April 14th, 2010, 01:41 PM   #1579
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Some photos of the world's most crowded metro;







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Old April 14th, 2010, 01:47 PM   #1580
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
Most Londoners couldn't care less if the Shanghai Metro is longer than the London Underground, me included. It only makes sense that it's longer considering the comparative sizes of the cities populations. In fact, Londoners should be proud to have had such a long network for a relatively small city for so long. Anyway, what matters most is the efficiency of the network and how well it caters to the city at hand. The Moscow or Paris Metros serve their cities well despite the fact that they're far shorter than both LU and the Shanghai Metro.
Hong Kong metro is way better than London and Paris.
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