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Old May 16th, 2010, 05:06 PM   #1701
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Shanghai's Metro, Now World's Longest, Continues to Grow Quickly as China Invests in Rapid Transit

» System will carry about five million passengers a day. Dozens of other Chinese cities are spending billions of dollars on similar grade-separated transit systems.

If China’s massive investment in high-speed rail is impressive, its huge spending binge in local rapid transit is remarkable. And nowhere is that record more dramatic than in Shanghai, the world’s most populous city proper.

Just fifteen years after the first segment of its first metro line opened, the city’s metro network has gained the title as the world’s longest with the opening of a section of Line 10 last week. This followed years of continuous construction and the opening of pieces of Lines 2, 9, and 11 over the past month. In anticipation of the inauguration of the city’s Expo 2010 event on May 1st, Line 13 will open sometime in the next two weeks.

Now Shanghai offers 282 stations and 420 km (261 mi) of lines, compared to 408 km in London and 368 km in New York, which now have the world’s second and third-largest rapid transit networks. Unlike those cities, which have only minor line extensions planned, Shanghai’s expansion plans are only half complete: not only does the city have 140 km of more lines currently under construction and intended for service by 2012, but it has an additional 300 km planned to be ready for operations by 2020, by which time this city alone will have more rapid transit mileage than the entire country of Japan.

The Shanghai Metro is now capable of handling about five million passengers a day; the system is likely to become the world’s most-used, passing Tokyo and Moscow, by the time the full construction program is complete.

Beijing is pursuing a similarly extension metro expansion project, but these cities aren’t alone: twelve Chinese municipalities currently have rapid transit, nineteen more have systems under construction, and an additional seventeen new networks are in planning. The national government has committed $150 billion to the projects by 2015, though additional funds originate from the municipalities themselves, such as the progressive and independent City of Shanghai. It’s a country-wide investment in urban transportation unparalleled in human history.

The American government, managing a much wealthier country than China, typically commits about two billion dollars a year to transit capital projects nationwide.

China’s aggressive efforts are a response to the country’s rapid urbanization, which has brought tens of millions of rural peasants into the cities as a result of increasing economic development. Though the Chinese automobile market is now larger than that of the United States, when compared on a per capita basis, it is still relatively small, especially considering that most Chinese car purchases are of first vehicles, not second or third, as are typical American consumer investments. This means that these quickly growing cities must respond with significant spending on improved public transportation — and they’ve chosen rapid transit as their preferred technology.

Specifically, Shanghai’s effort is an attempt to avoid American-style commuting habits even as its population increases in prosperity. With a per capita GDP three times the national average, Shanghai must endeavor to ensure that its growing number of middle-class inhabitants don’t clog the streets with their cars.

The European and North American experience shows that it can be done: In the first half of the 20th century, cities like New York, Berlin, and London reacted to a growing population and densification of land use by constructing extensive rapid transit networks and the results today are cities with high rates of public transportation use in spite of wealthy populations; Shanghai is likely to follow in the same mold.

But the extent and rapidity by which Shanghai is expanding its system reinforces the high-speed rail-driven sense that the West is falling behind, at least in infrastructure investment. Though no American and European cities are growing as quickly as their Chinese counterparts, there are significant demands for transportation improvements that are being unmet in virtually every major Western metropolitan region, with the possible exception of Madrid, Barcelona, and Paris, which are all spending billions to extend their transit networks out of the traditional urban core and into near suburbs. These neighborhoods have for years been deprived of adequate public transportation despite a real demand; most regions, however, aren’t spending on new line capacity.

Unlike the U.S. or Europe, China benefits from strong economic growth, making these investments more feasible, especially since construction costs are lower. Nonetheless, if Shanghai’s construction is so extensive as to be impossible to replicate in the more affluent parts of the world, current efforts in most major American and European cities are modest, doing very little in terms of transportation to respond to significant increases in population since the first half of the 20th century. They’re not making much of an effort to prepare for their increasingly urban futures by building new transit links.

China is.

http://www.thetransportpolitic.com/2...rapid-transit/
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Old May 16th, 2010, 05:08 PM   #1702
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Map in the link. I didn't post it in the previous post so that the text lines aren't extended.
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Old May 16th, 2010, 05:54 PM   #1703
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Go Shanghai!
Btw. it's a very nice map!
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Old May 16th, 2010, 06:23 PM   #1704
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Adding platform doors will increase dwell time as there needs to be checks to make sure that the train is aligned properly. I can't fathom how this is so hard to understand. As an example, the installation of platform doors on the Yamanote Line in Tōkyō will add dwell time (about 10 seconds per station). You can, however, try and recoup this through other means (such as converting to ATO if your line is currently human-operated).

For curved platforms, installation of PSDs may also require installation of gap fillers because passengers may not be able to see the gap through the doors. This will add time as there needs to be a check that the gap fillers are functioning (see http://www.info.gov.hk/gia/general/2...1003170192.htm).

Quote:
Originally Posted by particlez View Post
then there are the advantages of PSD, allowing more people to safely wait on the platform, within closer distance to the actual track itself. but for the purposes of this argument, they're ignored because those doors are supposedly so slow and unreliable based on your one experience.
For the second time, I am not arguing against PSDs. Only explaining why and how they increase dwell time.
Why oh why do you put words in my mouth?
And P.S., it's not one experience. I only highlighted that one since it was particularly egregious.

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sadly i recognize your name from various SSP (and i have never posted there) threads, getting all po'ed over some other minutiae.
Feeling is mutual.
I've followed your posts here for a while, and you always get your panties in a bunch anytime anyone says anything about China, even if it's harmless.

I will end my half of the discussion here, since we are straying off of Shanghai Metro and more towards platform doors, ATO, etc.
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Old May 16th, 2010, 07:05 PM   #1705
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Even if the platform doors increase dwell time, it isn't that much. I think its nice to be able to safely wait for the subway. You wanna talk about wasting time, lets talk about the stupid security checks they have, now Thats a complete waste of time. Well its a waste of time for most people, they havent been able to stop me yet.
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Old May 16th, 2010, 10:34 PM   #1706
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from: quashlo

Quote:
For the second time, I am not arguing against PSDs. Only explaining why and how they increase dwell time.
Why oh why do you put words in my mouth?
And P.S., it's not one experience. I only highlighted that one since it was particularly egregious.
the thing is, they don't.

in the late 80s, when singapore first tried installing the PSDs, there were issues with alignment, thus producing delays. there were even suggestions that PSDs should be removed because of their inherent unreliability. but that was a generation ago.

now with modern ATO systems these issues just aren't a common occurrence anymore. the ONLY possible explanation for an increased dwell time with a well-functioning PSD compared to a system with no PSDs, would involve trains opening their doors before complete deceleration, and closing the doors slightly after acceleration begins. for obvious reasons, this does not occur on ATO systems, let alone ATO systems with platform screen doors.

hopping on and off a moving vehicle could be programmed on an ATO train too, but the incremental gain in headway isn't going to offset the potential risks. plus the ATO's inherent advances in signaling mean more than the split second between the sets of doors opening.

thanks for skimming through my posts. the thing is, my perspectives are based upon my work experience and the locations of my work. i'm not so sure about you. for one thing, the PSD dwell time accusation has been roundly disproved. or you could choose to actually use a subway with PSDs and try to time its stops.

no one's going to put words in your mouth. but it's hard for anyone to take your statements seriously.
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Old May 17th, 2010, 09:35 PM   #1707
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An all day ticket was launched on April 24th. This day ticket primarily targeting tourists costs 18 Yuan. Since its launch 2000 such tickets were sold each day on average.
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Old May 17th, 2010, 10:17 PM   #1708
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Has line 10 been extended to regular service hours yet? they said they'd do that as soon as the expo started but online schedules still quote 9:00-16:00 schedules
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Old May 17th, 2010, 10:57 PM   #1709
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It's still operating 9-16. Seems nobody is certain when regular operation will start.

http://club.metrofans.sh.cn//thread-116633-1-1.html
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Old May 20th, 2010, 12:55 AM   #1710
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Looking at the map I've noticed there is already a station named Yuyuan Garden. Can anyone post a photo of it here and a photo of its entrance especially? How far is it from the gardens themselves?
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Old May 20th, 2010, 01:00 AM   #1711
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By the way, can anyone outline the city-center in relationship with the metro map?
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Old May 20th, 2010, 01:08 AM   #1712
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It is very hard to define a "city center" in major Asian cities in my opinion. To put it in simple terms, basically everything within the ring line (4) is central Shanghai. Though there are parts within line 4 in Pudong that are not very "central" and parts that are outside the ring line in Puxi that are indeed "central" so there are exceptions of course.
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Old May 20th, 2010, 03:16 PM   #1713
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Night City Dream_ View Post
Looking at the map I've noticed there is already a station named Yuyuan Garden. Can anyone post a photo of it here and a photo of its entrance especially? How far is it from the gardens themselves?
The geographic location Yuyuan Station is actually Old North Gate (老北门), which is a 5-minute walk from the actual garden.

Last edited by NCT; May 21st, 2010 at 04:54 PM.
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Old May 22nd, 2010, 03:12 AM   #1714
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Night City Dream_ View Post
Looking at the map I've noticed there is already a station named Yuyuan Garden. Can anyone post a photo of it here and a photo of its entrance especially?
A few days ago...







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Old May 23rd, 2010, 04:47 PM   #1715
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New ridership record, 6.013 million users on May 21st

Ridership by lines:


http://www.exploremetro.com/blog/wha...ne-in-shanghai
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Old May 24th, 2010, 07:22 AM   #1716
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Is it me or is Line 8's ridership disappointing?
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Old May 24th, 2010, 08:20 AM   #1717
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All of Shanghai's metro ridership is disappointing. Its by far the largest network in Greater China but it has over a million fewer riders daily than Beijing. Even Guangzhou's system, which is only a third the size of Shanghai's has almost as many daily riders. Do people in Shanghai just refuse to use the subway? Have they not gotten used to the fact that they don't need to use buses anymore? Why is it that Guangzhou and Beijing have so many more daily riders per km? I dunno about other metro systems in China but Guangzhou and Beijing sorta just popped out at me since they have noticeably high ridership when compared with the size of their networks. Plus Beijing and Guangzhou can't be denser than Shanghai can they?
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Old May 24th, 2010, 12:57 PM   #1718
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I think it's to do with Shanghai's relatively monocentric urban structure - journeys tend to be rather long with low turnovers at station stops.
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Old May 24th, 2010, 01:19 PM   #1719
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drunkenmunkey888 View Post
All of Shanghai's metro ridership is disappointing. Its by far the largest network in Greater China but it has over a million fewer riders daily than Beijing. Even Guangzhou's system, which is only a third the size of Shanghai's has almost as many daily riders. Do people in Shanghai just refuse to use the subway? Have they not gotten used to the fact that they don't need to use buses anymore? Why is it that Guangzhou and Beijing have so many more daily riders per km? I dunno about other metro systems in China but Guangzhou and Beijing sorta just popped out at me since they have noticeably high ridership when compared with the size of their networks. Plus Beijing and Guangzhou can't be denser than Shanghai can they?
What do you mean? It is going to take a few years for any new lines before ridership move upward more rapidly. Even now, the ridership is already very good.
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Old May 24th, 2010, 01:20 PM   #1720
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Why do they have two up escalators here? Why not have one escalator up and the other escalator down ?

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