daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 6th, 2011, 04:18 PM   #1961
napkcirtap
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 88
Likes (Received): 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abhishek901 View Post
I don't think one can correctly guess just looking at this maze. I guess u/g portion would be 40-65% but I want to narrow down that range.
yup , you're right on this one. since some stations underground don't have cross tracks, they have to terminate before the last underground station
napkcirtap no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old August 6th, 2011, 08:51 PM   #1962
guy4versa4
BANNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: alor star
Posts: 2,859
Likes (Received): 52

vote for my entry on MALAYSIA MRT LOGO design contest..thanks and have a nice day!

http://www.mrtcontest.com/?paged=271
guy4versa4 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 19th, 2011, 04:03 AM   #1963
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,891
Likes (Received): 18168

Safety boost for new Metro lines
Shanghai Daily
2011-8-17

FUTURE Metro lines in Shanghai will have additional protection against flooding and terrorist attacks as stronger, more efficient defense barriers are to be installed inside tunnels.

These gates could be quickly closed to protect trains from flood waters, toxic gas or explosion waves.

An older-generation product is already installed inside some tunnels in the city's current 12 Metro routes.

The under-construction extension to Line 11, Metro Line 12 and 13 will have the new defense gates installed inside their tunnels, according to local Metro management.

Orders have been placed with Shanghai Dikong Corrosion Prevention Equipment Co Ltd.

"Tests have proven the new product could successfully keep out water and gas. It has been put into production for installation on the new Metro services," a company official.

In addition, drivers are also able to manually close the gates to protect trains if required, the company official explained.

The new design has integrated the anti-flood and anti-attack functions currently performed by separate sets of gates inside existing Metro tunnels.

The combination will help reduce construction costs and raise protection efficiency, according to the product designer.

The use of a different type of concrete in the new gates means they will also be stronger and more resistant to damp, the producer said.

Metro management said, unless necessary, the older defense gates on current Metro tunnels would not be replaced by the new product.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 21st, 2011, 03:06 PM   #1964
Ashis Mitra
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Kolkata
Posts: 2,432
Likes (Received): 1142

Shanghai has the worlds largest metro network with 12 lines on 440 Km. It is also the fastest expanding metro. The rubber-tired tram is also very good.

In China 'light-rail' means generally overground metro (except Changchun). But Line 6 is almost half part underground. Then why it is called light rail?
Ashis Mitra no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 21st, 2011, 03:20 PM   #1965
Abhishek901
Registered User
 
Abhishek901's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Toronto
Posts: 11,764
Likes (Received): 1203

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashis Mitra View Post
Shanghai has the worlds largest metro network with 12 lines on 440 Km. It is also the fastest expanding metro. The rubber-tired tram is also very good.
Thanks for your valuable information but I guess people in Shanghai already know this
Abhishek901 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 21st, 2011, 05:23 PM   #1966
dwdwone
Subway Dave
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 569
Likes (Received): 39

Would rubber tired tram be an electric trolleybus?
dwdwone no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 21st, 2011, 10:09 PM   #1967
NCT
Not Cwite There
 
NCT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Shanghai, London, Nottingham
Posts: 6,204
Likes (Received): 1766

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashis Mitra View Post
Shanghai has the worlds largest metro network with 12 lines on 440 Km. It is also the fastest expanding metro. The rubber-tired tram is also very good.

In China 'light-rail' means generally overground metro (except Changchun). But Line 6 is almost half part underground. Then why it is called light rail?
In China the term 'light rail' is often wrongly used. Line 6 is in fact a true light-rail, each train being 4 light carriages long.
__________________
My Shanghai photos - Nanjing Road, People's Square, The Bund, Xintiandi and more!
NCT está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 22nd, 2011, 03:27 AM   #1968
big-dog
Registered User
 
big-dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 14,080
Likes (Received): 6840

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashis Mitra View Post
Shanghai has the worlds largest metro network with 12 lines on 440 Km. It is also the fastest expanding metro. The rubber-tired tram is also very good.

In China 'light-rail' means generally overground metro (except Changchun). But Line 6 is almost half part underground. Then why it is called light rail?
I tried the tram today, it's pretty fast and comfortable, best of all, the fare is only 2 Yuan.
__________________

Highcliff liked this post
big-dog no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2011, 06:07 PM   #1969
The Chemist
Right you are, Ken
 
The Chemist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Shanghai / 上海
Posts: 305
Likes (Received): 21

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCT View Post
In China the term 'light rail' is often wrongly used. Line 6 is in fact a true light-rail, each train being 4 light carriages long.
Line 5 is also true light rail, even more so than line 6 as the 4 carriages of line 5 are not interconnected - you cannot walk through the train from one end to the other as you can on every other line on the Shanghai Metro. Line 5 also is completely elevated - it has no underground section at all.

Line 6 would be better described as light metro than light rail, IMO.
__________________
城市,让生活更美好
"He could have been yawning or snarling - the story was never clear..."
My Flickr Photos
The Chemist no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2011, 06:10 PM   #1970
The Chemist
Right you are, Ken
 
The Chemist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Shanghai / 上海
Posts: 305
Likes (Received): 21

Quote:
Originally Posted by dwdwone View Post
Would rubber tired tram be an electric trolleybus?
No, because it has a (central) guide rail, which trolleybuses do not, and uses a pantograph for power pickup rather than trolley poles. Shanghai also has standard electric trolleybuses that run on some routes in the city centre.
__________________
城市,让生活更美好
"He could have been yawning or snarling - the story was never clear..."
My Flickr Photos
The Chemist no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 25th, 2011, 03:36 PM   #1971
Ashis Mitra
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Kolkata
Posts: 2,432
Likes (Received): 1142

Is there any future plan to extend the tram system?
Ashis Mitra no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 25th, 2011, 04:05 PM   #1972
Falubaz
Registered User
 
Falubaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Zielona Gora, Polska
Posts: 14,799
Likes (Received): 2940

Oh, i think trams are just too slow and too small for this kind of city. They need not only more metros but RER/cercanias-type of fast suburban railways, or express services on metro lines. This isnt a tiny town, which can be served by tine trams. It needs massive transportation means.
__________________
Zielona Góra - Ziemia Lubuska

₪₪₪Zielona Góra moim okiem₪₪₪ Zielonogórskie autobusy₪₪₪Port Lotniczy ZIElona Góra₪₪₪ BRT₪₪₪ścieżki rowerowe w ZG
₪₪₪[Świat] „Przebłyski pamięci”₪₪₪Moja Ameryka - nie tylko Stany
Falubaz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 31st, 2011, 03:33 PM   #1973
Ashis Mitra
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Kolkata
Posts: 2,432
Likes (Received): 1142

At last we Asians could say proudly that Shanghai has the largest subway network of the world, but here the question & confusion arises –

Previously the confusion was that about line 5 & 6. Wikipedia says those 2 are light rails, but www.urbanrail.net says they are also metro. After reading this thread earlier, many Chinese people said me that in China light rail means over-ground/elevated metro, so those lines are also metro. But recently some people wrote here that those are light rails, not metro.

So what stands at last? Are line 5 & 6 light rails or not? This confusion increases because these 2 lines are operated by Shanghai Modern Rail Transit Co. Ltd. Where as rest of the lines are operated by Shanghai Shentong Metro Co. Ltd.

If those lines are light rail, then metro length will be decreased 50.3 Km, and then Shanghai will be still backward after London Metro, and will not be the largest metro of the world.

Please clear the confusion.
Ashis Mitra no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 31st, 2011, 03:34 PM   #1974
Ashis Mitra
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Kolkata
Posts: 2,432
Likes (Received): 1142

Why Shanghai chose rubber tyred tram? It is much costly, the infrastructure is also costly, and it needs regular maintenance. Conventional steel wheeled tram is easier to install, run, & maintenance.

I suggest if they plan any new tram lines, they should build those as steel wheeled tram.
Ashis Mitra no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 31st, 2011, 05:32 PM   #1975
drunkenmunkey888
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 921
Likes (Received): 53

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashis Mitra View Post
At last we Asians could say proudly that Shanghai has the largest subway network of the world, but here the question & confusion arises –

Previously the confusion was that about line 5 & 6. Wikipedia says those 2 are light rails, but www.urbanrail.net says they are also metro. After reading this thread earlier, many Chinese people said me that in China light rail means over-ground/elevated metro, so those lines are also metro. But recently some people wrote here that those are light rails, not metro.

So what stands at last? Are line 5 & 6 light rails or not? This confusion increases because these 2 lines are operated by Shanghai Modern Rail Transit Co. Ltd. Where as rest of the lines are operated by Shanghai Shentong Metro Co. Ltd.

If those lines are light rail, then metro length will be decreased 50.3 Km, and then Shanghai will be still backward after London Metro, and will not be the largest metro of the world.

Please clear the confusion.
Lines 5 and 6 are indisputably heavy rail metro systems. Light rails stop for traffic lights and share the street with cars. Lines 5 and 6 are separated and Line 6 operates underground for most of its route. They have higher capacity per car than IRT types trains, which only have three doors on a side and a carbody width of 2.6 meters. Nobody would say that IRT trains are light rail.

If you were to call lines 5 and 6 of the Shanghai light rail, then the IRT 7 train is light rail, the IRT 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 trains are all light rail (maybe not the 1 train since it is only above ground north of Dyckman street). Only the IND and BMT would qualify as subways under the Chinese definition (although all IND and BMT trains go above ground at some point except the E train) or that all trains in Bronx and Brooklyn would be considered light rail. Plus operating companies don't matter. The IRT, BMT, and IND were all different operators before the MTA bought them out.
drunkenmunkey888 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 31st, 2011, 05:33 PM   #1976
CNGL
Leudimin
 
CNGL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Huesca
Posts: 7,452
Likes (Received): 1932

This thread must be merged with this one.
__________________
Neque porro quisquam est qui dolorem ipsum, quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non nunquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem - Cicero, De finibus bonorum et malorum, from which placeholder text is derived.
CNGL no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 31st, 2011, 05:40 PM   #1977
Attus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Rheinbach
Posts: 2,766
Likes (Received): 1039

Quote:
Originally Posted by drunkenmunkey888 View Post
Light rails stop for traffic lights and share the street with cars.
Not necesserily. What you speak about is a tram :-)
Attus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 31st, 2011, 06:24 PM   #1978
Falubaz
Registered User
 
Falubaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Zielona Gora, Polska
Posts: 14,799
Likes (Received): 2940

This is just a matter of definition. No need to argue about that. Shanghai metro is the largest in the world - That's a fact.
Torino, Genova, Toulouse, Rouen, Lausanne and many other metros use actually light trains but are still considered as metros.
__________________
Zielona Góra - Ziemia Lubuska

₪₪₪Zielona Góra moim okiem₪₪₪ Zielonogórskie autobusy₪₪₪Port Lotniczy ZIElona Góra₪₪₪ BRT₪₪₪ścieżki rowerowe w ZG
₪₪₪[Świat] „Przebłyski pamięci”₪₪₪Moja Ameryka - nie tylko Stany
Falubaz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 1st, 2011, 12:15 AM   #1979
Silly_Walks
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,976
Likes (Received): 836

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashis Mitra View Post
At last we Asians could say proudly that Shanghai has the largest subway network of the world
Why are you proud? Did you build it?
Silly_Walks no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 1st, 2011, 12:26 AM   #1980
Silly_Walks
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,976
Likes (Received): 836

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashis Mitra View Post
Previously the confusion was that about line 5 & 6. Wikipedia says those 2 are light rails, but www.urbanrail.net says they are also metro. After reading this thread earlier, many Chinese people said me that in China light rail means over-ground/elevated metro, so those lines are also metro. But recently some people wrote here that those are light rails, not metro.
I don't know if this is what you are talking about, but a short time ago i corrected one of your posts where you were talking about the Shenzhen metro terminating at the border, from where it connected to the "Hong Kong light rail". In fact, at Lo Wu and Lok Ma Chau you can get on the Hong Kong MTR, which is a metro. The Light Rail in Hong Kong is near the town of Yuen Long, which is nowhere near the border crossing you were talking about.

You were using the Mainland Chinese version of the word light rail, which differs from everywhere else in the world. Mainland Chinese vocabulary uses light rail when they mean "elevated subway"... what the rest of the world would probably just call a "metro", or something similar.

When the rest of the world uses "light rail", they generally mean some sort of a tram/metro hybrid (although there are geographical differences about the exact meaning), which the Chinese "light rails" i have seen are definitely NOT. They were all full-fledged grade-separated metro.



So maybe to avoid further confusion, just use terms like metro to describe both subways and elevated metros.
Silly_Walks no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
metro, shanghai, tram

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium