daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture

Architecture news and discussions on all buildings types and urban spaces
» Classic Architecture | European Classic Architecture and Landscapes | Public Space | Shopping Architecture | Design & Lifestyle | Urban Renewal and Redevelopment



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 11th, 2008, 09:44 AM   #1
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17804

Top Architects Reshape Warsaw

Top architects reshape Warsaw
10 July 2008

WARSAW, Poland (AP) - History beat Poland's capital to a pulp in the first half of the 20th century, then patched it up with blocs of communist concrete in the second.

Now, backed by a resurgent economy, Warsaw is shaking off its socialist architectural hangover and putting forward a bold new face of glistening skyscrapers designed by some of the world's top architects.

"After two generations of the grayness of communism, Warsaw has entered a really fantastic period of a renaissance and of a dynamic new architecture," said American architect Daniel Libeskind, who designed Berlin's landmark Jewish Museum and the master plan for New York's ground zero, during a recent visit.

And much of that new architecture is coming off the drawing boards of the world's master architects. Libeskind, Iraqi-born Zaha Hadid and Chicago-based Helmut Jahn have all designed soaring glass towers that aim to reshape a Warsaw skyline long dominated by the Stalinist-era Palace of Culture.

The wedding cakelike skyscraper, an unwanted "gift" from Soviet leader Josef Stalin to Poland, served as a constant reminder to Poles of their country's satellite status toward Moscow during the Cold War.

The imposing sandy-brown tower -- reminiscent of similar socialist-realist giants in Moscow -- rises 42 stories above broad avenues lined with monotonous apartment buildings, crumbling prewar tenements and now modern glass office buildings.

Warsaw's potential to build up in the heart of the city -- an option denied most European capitals packed with gothic churches, baroque palaces and fin-de-siecle townhouses -- stems from the capital's tragic history.

Around 85 percent of Warsaw was reduced to rubble during World War II, with most of the damage coming in pitched street battles during the 1943 Warsaw Ghetto Uprising and a year later between Polish insurgents and the Nazi occupiers in the Warsaw Uprising. After crushing the 1944 revolt, the Germans systematically dynamited most of the remaining buildings and shipped the surviving residents to concentration camps.

That painful episode now allows Warsaw to develop its downtown in ways Paris, Vienna, Austria, and Prague, Czech Republic -- crammed with historic buildings -- cannot.

"Other cities weren't destroyed, and that is their advantage, but also their limitation," said Tomasz Zemla, Warsaw's deputy director of architecture and planning. "We have a different, dramatic history, but that allows us to have a whole lot more freedom in building."

And the city aims to take advantage of it.

Mayor Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz, who took office in 2006, is leading the skyscraper charge in Warsaw, and has said she wants the city "to be a place where architects from across the world and Poland compete."

"The city has great potential, and a lot of land to build on in the center," she said. "Warsaw must grow up if it wants to compete with other big European cities."

A handful of high-rise hotels and office buildings have already popped up on the city's skyline since communism's fall in 1989, giving the once flat, drab city straddling the Vistula River a modern profile and providing company in the sky for the Palace of Culture.

But the real action is just getting started.

Developers have submitted some 30 new projects for high-rises in all, although city officials estimate that only five to 10 of them will be built. Among those in the pipeline is a 1,017-foot (310-meter) giant, which is only in the initial planning stages, that would be Europe's tallest building.

Workers have already broken ground on Libeskind's sweeping glass tower that is to rise 630 feet (192 meters), just short of the Palace of Culture across the street. The architect has described the design of the 54-story apartment building as one that takes Polish history into consideration -- evoking the Polish eagle with its royal crown, a national symbol denied Poland during the communist-era Cold War. It is slated to be finished by 2010.

Not to be outdone, Hadid's Lilium Tower project recently submitted papers for the London-based architect's 788 feet (240 meter) high residential building to rise also in the central business district. Narrow at its base, the futuristic -- almost cactuslike -- glass tower bows outward around the middle before tapering off again at its peak.

"It's not a mass produced square, but actually like a flower it grows around the edges," Hadid said while presenting plans for the building in Warsaw at the end of May.

And Chicago-based architect Helmut Jahn, who built Sony Center in Berlin and One Liberty Place in Philadelphia, will submit final plans for a 525-foot (160-meter) luxury apartment tower nearby.

On the adjacent plot, city hall is expected to give the green light to Poland's Jewish community to build a 680-foot (207-meter) sail-shaped skyscraper that would be attached to the Nozyk synagogue, the only one remaining from before the war.

Those projects bode well for the ambitions of the town as it looks to leave behind the drab, flat-faced structures forced on it over 45 years of communism and take its place among Europe's leading cities.

"There are many great architects already working in Warsaw," Libeskind said. "It promises well for the city that the ambitious want to contribute."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 11th, 2008, 02:33 PM   #2
Iluminat
Redsigert User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 11,459
Likes (Received): 4542

Quote:
Those projects bode well for the ambitions of the town as it looks to leave behind the drab, flat-faced structures forced on it over 45 years of communism and take its place among Europe's leading cities.
Warsaw wasn't really that flat during communism...


Anyway I hate this new Zaha's cactus
Iluminat no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 06:00 PM   #3
mbuildings
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Montevideo, Uruguay
Posts: 5,211
Likes (Received): 69

very good article
mbuildings no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 21st, 2008, 03:54 PM   #4
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17804

Cutting-edge Warsaw tower grounded in history: Libeskind
26 September 2008
Agence France Presse

Acclaimed US architect Daniel Libeskind Friday laid the cornerstone for his cutting-edge design luxury residential tower in the heart of Warsaw, the city of his childhood.

"This is something very unique, very personal and something uniquely grounded in the history of Poland, of Warsaw, of my country, of a city that I love," said Libeskind.

The world-class architect -- whose long list of works include Berlin's Jewish Museum and the planned Freedom Tower on New York's symbolic Ground Zero site was born in Poland in 1946 into a family of Polish-Jews.

He later moved to Israel and eventually settled in the United States.

Warsaw was all-but destroyed on the orders of Nazi German dictator Adolf Hilter in 1944, during the closing days of World War II.

The post-war skyline of Warsaw was dominated by the Palace of Culture and Science, a gargantuan 230-meter specimen of socialist-realist architecture, built by Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin in the 1950s.

Dubbed Zlota 44 (its address means gold in Polish), Libeskind's 54-floor, 192-meter-high (630 feet) glass facade tower shaped in the form of a sail will symbolically face the chunky Stalinist-era palace.

"It relates itself in a very dramatic way to the Palace of Culture -- that 'gift' from elsewhere. Even on a grey day this building will shine and have a very special character," Libeskind said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 21st, 2009, 12:06 AM   #5
casofatal
Registered User
 
casofatal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,238
Likes (Received): 2309

We want more pics showing before and after of Warsaw!
casofatal no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 22nd, 2009, 12:04 AM   #6
JPBrazil
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Belo Horizonte
Posts: 5,655
Likes (Received): 37

Renders?
JPBrazil no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 22nd, 2009, 01:23 AM   #7
Elvenking
Registered User
 
Elvenking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Gdynia/Gdańsk
Posts: 4,221
Likes (Received): 2551

You know, crisis. All skyscrapers are on hold

That's well-known panorama of how it should look like about 2012



5 new towers, only Zlota44 by Liebeskind started, but stopped on 17th floor
__________________
"A pan myślisz, że chaotyczne kombinacje efemerycznych pryncypiów są w stanie zdeterminować neutralną cywitatywę absolutnego relatywizmu immanentno-transcendentalnej solipsystycznej jaźni? Tak czy nie?! Gadaj pan!!!"
Elvenking no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 14th, 2009, 05:32 AM   #8
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17804

What to do with Warsaw's 'palace'?
Loathed icon of Stalinist era has citizens debating merits of history versus the benefits of change

Special to the Star
3 September 2009
The Toronto Star

I always get a warm feeling of familiarity when the bus turns a corner and I finally glimpse Warsaw's most hated building. It's a sign I'm home.

The Palace of Culture and Science, a gift from Soviet leader Joseph Stalin in 1955, is one of the world's most impressive examples of socialist realism. It's also one of the biggest controversies in a controversial city.

While most cities market their skyline to tourists, Warsaw's is conspicuously endowed with a 231-metre-tall skyscraper, a statue to Communism that sticks out like a sore digit in the heart of the city.

The palace evokes a range of emotion. But it's a living monument to a bygone system, and it's grown into the city. Here you can view Warsaw from above, visit the opulent Congress Hall, where the Polish Communist party met annually, take in a play, go for a swim or get a university degree.

Socialist realism promoted Communism by glorifying the struggle of the worker. It was born in the Soviet Union in the 1930s as a way of spreading Communist doctrine.

And at the Palace of Culture, it's clear the Communists knew what they were doing. The fact it's hard to get to - you have to navigate a maze of underground passageways, elbow your way past vendors of everything from stale pastries to shoelaces, and take a long stroll through what used to be the Communist parade square - makes it seem, if possible, even more palatial. Looking up at its super-human scale allegorical statues and series of spires and subspires, one can't help but feel a sense of awe.

It's hard to imagine it in 1950s' Warsaw, when the next tallest building was 66 metres.

"It looked like a grand piano on a beach," Agata Passent wrote in her book, Long Live the Palace.

That was the idea - to overwhelm Warsaw's downtown with a symbol of Communist might.

"Situating it where it is had the character of a brutal statue in the centre of the city," said Waldemar Baraniewski, an expert in totalitarian art and a professor at the University of Warsaw.

"And the controversy was not about the architecture. It was a location that took nothing into consideration."

Contests to identify the heart of Warsaw routinely point to the palace. For young people, the ridiculously embellished building has become a symbol of their home's quirky history.

Even so, many of those who lived through Communism argue the building should go. Jan Pietrzak, a Polish satirist, was among 70 artists and academics who lobbied to remove the palace from the heritage register. They signed a letter calling the building a "symbol of Polish enslavement by the Soviet empire."

"The palace should be torn down to the ground, and a new part of the city built there. It's a palace to Stalin, built on the rubble of post-war Warsaw," Pietrzak said.

But others disagree. "We can't escape from history. If it was created then destroying it is a violation of history. History is a layering of discourses," Baraniewski argued.

And it's a unique construction in a city used to playing second fiddle, argues Krzysztof Markowski, vice-president of the company managing the building.

"In Warsaw there's few things like that," he says. The old town, for instance? "Prague's is better."

But he understands the negativity. "Some see it as a wooden stake driven into a healthy heart, and they want to cover it or take it apart. This hatred will pass to history. It will pass with the people who have the right to feel that way."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 14th, 2009, 01:16 PM   #9
crisouju
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 1
Likes (Received): 0

I accept: This is something very unique, very personal and something uniquely grounded in the history of Poland, of Warsaw, of my country, of a city. The world-class architect -- whose long list of works include Berlin's Jewish Museum and the planned Freedom Tower on New York's symbolic Ground Zero site was born in Poland in 1946 into a family of Polish-Jews.
crisouju no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2010, 07:26 PM   #10
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17804

Warsaw tact
The new British embassy in Poland's capital is the most elegant work of diplomatic architecture in decades
21 November 2009
Financial Times

Building an embassy is a complex act of diplomacy: like international relations themselves, such architecture demands "a negotiation between representation and security", as the architect Tony Fretton puts it, projecting a national image of sophistication and cultural engagement, and integration into local context, at the same time as ensuring the protection of those who work within and around it.

The bombing of the British consulate in Istanbul in 2003 radically altered the terms of reference for diplomatic buildings. Tony Fretton Architects had already been commissioned to build a new British embassy in Warsaw, not long before the events in Istanbul, but the original site in the centre of the city was abandoned as indefensible and a new site was chosen in a more conventional embassy quarter. The result is, I think, the most elegant work of diplomatic architecture in decades.

The building appears to the street as a kind of crystalline villa, a ghost of the villas that often housed foreign embassies in European capitals. It is set back significantly from the street, in line with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office's guidelines, behind a tall fence that consists of individual verticals not linked together. The effect is intriguing: it appears transparent when viewed from in front but, as you move around, the verticals seem to meld into a continuous surface, as if the site were bounded by a solid wall.

Within the boundary, a stone portecochère provides a solid canopy at the entrance but the building itself melts into the sky. In its appropriation both of Mies van der Rohe's exquisite transparency and the corporate rationalism of Skidmore Owings and Merrill, the US firm that built New York's Lever House, it creates a language that is not quite new but blends the commercial with the avant-garde to create a building of dignity and presence.

Returning to Fretton's notion of a "negotiation between representation and security", I ask how he addressed the problems of "representation", how an architect might attempt to "portray" British diplomacy. He simply replied: "I think once we were chosen it was simply up to us to do our best building." Fretton compares the process to a fitting at a bespoke tailor. "You expect the tailor to listen, to be observant, but also to be able to read the client and the intention."

Indeed, the elegant restraint of the building reflects the Savile Row suit at every turn. It has a discreetly blast-resistant glass façade (composed of a double skin and a wall that allows ventilation and insulation), which is reflective and open yet functions as a sophisticated shield against the climate as well as against aggression. The rich black walnut veneers on the interior walls and doors act as a luxurious but restrained lining.

The building's form, with "shoulders" to either side of a raised central section, allows the creation of roof terraces; within, glazed shafts bring light into the heart of the various floors, with glimpses of vegetation and greenery. The huge reception space on the ground floor, with its touch of luxuriously veined marble and richly veneered walls, is neither flashy nor ostentatious. The large café allows diplomatic and local staff to mix and is surprisingly similar in feel to Fretton's Camden Arts Centre, which transposed this central European feel to north London. In Warsaw, the influences all seem to fall into place.

Fretton's talent is to take archetypal architectures (the villa, the smooth contemporary office) and to extract their essence to create something new yet deeply familiar. "Modernism just isn't new any more. It has been absorbed by everyday culture," he says. He is the opposite of his contemporaries, say Zaha Hadid or Rem Koolhaas, whom he calls "formal innovators". He declares himself more interested in forms that have already passed into the culture and "in how people understand and relate to buildings".

The FCO has a commendable recent record in diplomatic architecture, and Fretton's building, too, is exemplary: intelligent, sophisticated, dignified and ethereal.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2010, 07:37 PM   #11
Ramses
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,044
Likes (Received): 21

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
"The palace should be torn down to the ground, and a new part of the city built there. It's a palace to Stalin, built on the rubble of post-war Warsaw," Pietrzak said.
Whether you like this tower or not, this thing is one of the symbols of Warsaw. For me this tower is one of the biggest reasons to visit Warsaw. The newer ones don't mean anything to me, they could be built everywhere on the world. If you destroy this Sovjet-heritage it and replace it with another anonymous international glassbox, i have one reason less to travel to Warsaw.

For the rest nice developments in Warsaw.
Ramses no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2010, 09:22 PM   #12
Wielki Gmach
Registered User
 
Wielki Gmach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Białystok
Posts: 293
Likes (Received): 17

I'm Pole and I love this palace
a lot of people in poland love palace of culture (for his architecutre of course)


http://mw2.google.com/mw-panoramio/p...ium/498396.jpg
Wielki Gmach no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2010, 09:25 PM   #13
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17804

Aha .. Soviet architecture. Saw a similar cousin in Riga as well!



Agree although hideous, it should stay as part of preserving local history.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2010, 10:36 PM   #14
Iluminat
Redsigert User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 11,459
Likes (Received): 4542

What so hideous about it , in fact it's very similar to American architecture from the '30.
Usually we call this style "socrealizm" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialist_realism rather than "soviet" or "Stalinist" personally I don't like this names because they are rather confusing.
Iluminat no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2010, 10:56 PM   #15
Gatis
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 5,198
Likes (Received): 591

I like that one in Riga and think that few people here have bad feelings towards it. After all quite a few royal palaces in Western Europe were built by terrible rulers too. But... in fact these buildings are built by people themselves. Stalin wasn't noticed working there.
__________________
Wondermondo - an armchair guide to world attractions - most interesting landmarks and attractions in the world!
Gatis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2010, 11:12 PM   #16
Iluminat
Redsigert User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 11,459
Likes (Received): 4542

Well when it comes to people workers who built Pkin in Warsaw were largely from the Soviet Union, they lived in separated wooden house district that survived to this day, not far from my home: http://warszawa78.blox.pl/2008/03/wpis.html
Iluminat no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 31st, 2010, 07:44 PM   #17
Wielki Gmach
Registered User
 
Wielki Gmach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Białystok
Posts: 293
Likes (Received): 17

Quote:
Originally Posted by Iluminat View Post
What so hideous about it , in fact it's very similar to American architecture from the '30.
Usually we call this style "socrealizm" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialist_realism rather than "soviet" or "Stalinist" personally I don't like this names because they are rather confusing.
socrealizm is my favorite style in architecture,
socrealizm is so monumental

few example from Warsaw


http://photos.hotele.pl/warszawa_mdm_1_1.jpg


http://accommo.pl/zdjecia/dc14f2cf73...f1bbd56e16.jpg


http://images27.fotosik.pl/4/c90e30e8f5de9cf1.jpg


http://fotoforum.gazeta.pl/photo/3/l...hcaTpoWeQX.jpg

Last edited by Wielki Gmach; July 31st, 2010 at 07:56 PM.
Wielki Gmach no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 06:03 PM   #18
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17804

Orco Needn't Refile Warsaw Skyscraper Permit - Report
17 August 2010

WARSAW (Dow Jones)--Luxembourg-based Orco Property Group SA (ORC.FR) won't have to refile a building permit for a skyscraper that is being built in Warsaw, Polish daily Rzeczpospolita reports Tuesday, citing local government officials.

The decision from municipal government officials means work can continue on the Zlota 44 residential tower. Construction was halted in 2009 when banks refused to continue financing the indebted firm. Since then, neighboring residents have lodged a lawsuit claiming the building will block sunlight into their apartments and lower their value, prompting a court earlier this year to invalidate the firm's building permit.

Orco had planned to file a lawsuit against Poland on the grounds that the country's legal system had stalled its investment and demand 600 million zlotys ($194.5 million) in compensation, another daily, Puls Biznesu, reported Monday.

Municipal government officials decided to make a decision based on documents that had already been filed rather than redirect the case to the Municipal Building Oversight Inspectorate, Rzeczpospolita reports, citing spokeswoman Iveta Bialy.

"If all the documents are in order, we will confirm the legality of the permit," Bialy said. "If there is something missing, we'll refer the documents to [Warsaw's] mayor for completion."

The next decision on the Zlota 44 permit is due Sept. 3, Rzeczpospolita reports.

Newspaper websites: www.rp.pl; www.zyciewarszawy.pl
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu