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View Poll Results: Do You like stadiums
Yes 154 96.86%
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Old June 8th, 2007, 07:51 PM   #781
1878EFC
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Goodison Park atmosphere

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTwwAXQOhcg
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Old June 8th, 2007, 11:30 PM   #782
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Y'all won't be convinced until you go to a College Football game. That truly is a live-or-die type situation for the fans.
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Old June 8th, 2007, 11:43 PM   #783
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rohne View Post
The quality of supporters does NOT depend on how often the games are sold out.
Just an example: during the now finished season Eintracht Frankfurt had an average attendance of 47625 (stadium capacity: 51500). But the atmosphere was really boring compared to the asskicking atmosphere created the seasons before with much less spectators (04/05 avg 24409 - ok capacity was only 30000 because construction hadn't been completed yet, 05/06: avg 41863) when there was not a single club in the whole country whose supporters could compete with that.
Or look at Munich or Dortmund. Nearly every game sold. But no atmosphere. In Dortmund they only start singing loudly when they lead by 2 at least, and Munich is just a hopeless case, especially now since the Schickeria (Munich's ultras) is locked out.

Italy is also worth to be mentioned. Attendance statistics aren't impressive, but this country was home to the Ultrà culture which spread out over Europe when Italian supporters were already ten steps ahead and they still belong to the top. Wo cares 'bout whether a game is sold out or not? It's the support that counts!
you are right that being completely sold out versus having a couple thousand open seats doesn't make a huge difference. But Frankfurt was just over 3,000 open seats per match. But when I flip on FSC and Lazio has 20,000 people in the 80,000 seat stadio Olimpico and all they do is sit there with out making any noise exept when a goal is scored, I'd call that shite atmosphere. Juventus is one of the top teams in the world and yet the Del Alpi is half empty, and there going to have 35,000 seats or something post renovation. Who has heard of a team that good drawing that badly? AC and Inter have fantastic support, but can't think of any other clubs that have great atmosphere or sell out regularly, much less both in the Seire A. Dortmund looks impressive on TV (especially during the world cup for Germany games), although I did not have a chance to get to one of their games when I was over there. Hamburg had phenominal atmsophere for the game I saw there. But my point was saying Americans don't support there teams was an unfounded load of bull. When College teams make that kind of noise (as well as a good number of pro teams) and haven't had an open seat in thirty or forty years in cases, you just can't make that arguement. After the Minnesota Gophers hockey team won those NCAA tittles they were rioting in the streets. Thats college ice hockey! A month or so ago ESPN said the estimated wait for Packers season ticket is about 734 years. How many teams have that kind of support?
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Old June 9th, 2007, 12:20 AM   #784
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADCS View Post
Y'all won't be convinced until you go to a College Football game. That truly is a live-or-die type situation for the fans.
come and watch The Old Firm, the Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese Classic, the Mersey Side Derby, London Derby's, the Roman Derby, the Milanese Derby, the Athens derby and the kolenpot derby. that is more than life or death in these situations.

@bigmac1212
at real we play the most matches by far on real natural soil in our top competitions. only a few clubs may play with uefa permission on fake. if I look at the most games in the us I dont see natural soil. or what? at least it doesnt look like it.
and the number of stadiums with roofs will be the same somewhere. the first with a roof was the Amsterdam Arena in 1996. stadiums in america had those already for over some decades by then I guess
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Old June 9th, 2007, 01:09 AM   #785
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I would say the majority of American stadiums have natural grass. The domes obviously don't, but the retractible roofed and open air one usually do. In places like seattle the amount of rain combined with what NFL season does to a pitch would leave them playing in nothing but mud by week 12. For American Football there isn't a huge difference in performance between field turf and actual grass (I have played both football and american football on both, I prefer grass, but could certainly tolerate field turf). In cold climates, like Buffalo, or BMO Field in Toronto sometimes they have turf because it won't deteriorate during winter months and the NFL and CFL post seasons run well into the winter. Places like Greenbay have always had grass and use under-field heating to keep it alive (this sort of works, but can lead to muddy fields). I beleive it has been previously stated like 600 times that we don't have roofs most of the time because we don't want them, being in the elements is part of the experience.
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Old June 9th, 2007, 02:05 AM   #786
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My favorite stadiums are:

Jornalista Mário Filho (Maracanã), Rio de Janeiro - Brazil


Ecopa Stadium, Shizuoka - Japan


Mangueirao, Pará - Brazil


Giants Stadium, NJ - USA


Estadio Azteca, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico
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Old June 9th, 2007, 03:22 AM   #787
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red85 View Post
come and watch The Old Firm, the Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese Classic, the Mersey Side Derby, London Derby's, the Roman Derby, the Milanese Derby, the Athens derby and the kolenpot derby. that is more than life or death in these situations.

@bigmac1212
at real we play the most matches by far on real natural soil in our top competitions. only a few clubs may play with uefa permission on fake. if I look at the most games in the us I dont see natural soil. or what? at least it doesnt look like it.
and the number of stadiums with roofs will be the same somewhere. the first with a roof was the Amsterdam Arena in 1996. stadiums in america had those already for over some decades by then I guess
i agree mate

in liverpool football is a major part of your life lits like a religion theres so much passion its unbelievable, the merseyside derby means so much to the people of liverpool whether there everton or liverpool fans. its who gets the bragging rights until the next derby and the atmosphere is something special
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Old June 9th, 2007, 03:45 AM   #788
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Quote:
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come and watch The Old Firm, the Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese Classic, the Mersey Side Derby, London Derby's, the Roman Derby, the Milanese Derby, the Athens derby and the kolenpot derby. that is more than life or death in these situations.
I never said that European soccer fans were anything less than die-hard. You were the one saying that Americans were at best lukewarm. I provided counterexamples.

Oh, and games like Ohio State - Michigan, Oklahoma - Texas, Alabama - Auburn have much the same atmosphere. Don't knock it until you've experienced it.
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Old June 9th, 2007, 04:49 AM   #789
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Soldier Field (only the inside. The outside is a horrible perversion of a once great stadium:

Original configuration, sat upwards of 120,000







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Old June 9th, 2007, 05:02 AM   #790
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I've gone to quite a few Michigan-Ohio State games and I can assure you that few sporting experiences can compare to a big time college football game. For comparisons sake, I've been to Indy 500, NCAA Basketball Tournament, NHL Playoffs, US Open Golf, PGA Championship, 16th hole at TPC Scottsdale(loudest hole in golf), college football at UM/OSU/PennSt./UT/Rose Bowl game/Fiesta Bowl game, NBA, NFL, MLB, among others.

For example, in 2002 in Columbus there were around 107,000 in the stadium for the game and another estimated 300,000 people partying in the vicinity around the stadium. Even as a die hard Michigan fan, I will admit that the scene in Columbus that day was a site to behold. After Ohio State won the game and clinched a trip to the championship game, the crowd rushed the field and tore down the goal post while being peppersprayed by police. Walking out of the stadium was pandemonium as around 380,000 Ohio State fans were going nuts, celebrating. I find it hard to believe that any sporting event anywhere could compare to that scene that day.

As for the whole Europe vs. United States debate...what's the point? You guys across the pond like a game where a bunch of pansies run around for 90 minutes occasionally taking a dive and faking an injury to liven up the game. I'd argue that watching the fans at a match is more entertaining. We prefer a lot more action, a lot more contact, and no fake injuries. Don't get me wrong, an NBA player will take a dive in a heartbeat to draw a foul, but he won't roll around in agony and then suddenly be running full speed two minutes later. How can you, as a "football" fan, respect that nonsense???

I'll usually watch a few of the World Cup games, but I just haven't been able to get into soccer. Meanwhile, I have a brother who watches nothing but soccer...go figure!
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Old June 9th, 2007, 05:32 AM   #791
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benn View Post
But when I flip on FSC and Lazio has 20,000 people in the 80,000 seat stadio Olimpico and all they do is sit there with out making any noise exept when a goal is scored, I'd call that shite atmosphere. Juventus is one of the top teams in the world and yet the Del Alpi is half empty, and there going to have 35,000 seats or something post renovation. Who has heard of a team that good drawing that badly?
In a way, I agree but I really don't think how full a stadium is (per se, at least) has an impact on the atmosphere. it depends on how closely grouped the fans are.

For example, last weekend, I was at the Rugby 7s in Edinburgh and while there were maybe 10,000 people in the stadium, the atmosphere inside Murrayfield (capacity, 67,500) was incredible, especially in the last game of the day, when Scotland played out of their skin and beat the Springboks (sadly, Scotland seemed to show up on the second day with a massive hangover buy Kenya and Russia generated much of the same atmosphere).

The reason for this was quite simple; about 8,000 of the 10,000 were in the lower East Stand, all grouped together. It really didn't matter that most of the stadium was empty, because the fans that were present filled up a small part of the stadium, which held all of the atmosphere in.

Honestly, as long as the fans that are there are kept together and limited in where they are able to stand / sit, the atmosphere can be created and locked in very, very well.
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Old June 9th, 2007, 06:23 AM   #792
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Quote:
Originally Posted by b1gh0u5e View Post

For example, in 2002 in Columbus there were around 107,000 in the stadium for the game and another estimated 300,000 people partying in the vicinity around the stadium. Even as a die hard Michigan fan, I will admit that the scene in Columbus that day was a site to behold. After Ohio State won the game and clinched a trip to the championship game, the crowd rushed the field and tore down the goal post while being peppersprayed by police. Walking out of the stadium was pandemonium as around 380,000 Ohio State fans were going nuts, celebrating. I find it hard to believe that any sporting event anywhere could compare to that scene that day.
You can find it as hard as you like but the fact remains that in Europe the atmosphere IS better. It isn't even close (not a chance). Like i said from what i've heard + seen only South America would come close. Your 107,000 peeps would be drowned out simply by the Kop. Deal with it. The events you mentioned are crazy (i for one love NCAA), but as you also mentioned it is really an excuse to party and have a good time. In Europe it isn't to party, it is to support your team till death. Honestly to some it is a way of life and a famliy allegiance. Traditions are deep and steeped with events from history. You can really tell the difference when you go to a game in Oz. In some cases its good that way (less trouble at times), but the atmosphere is lacking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by b1gh0u5e View Post
As for the whole Europe vs. United States debate...what's the point? You guys across the pond like a game where a bunch of pansies run around for 90 minutes occasionally taking a dive and faking an injury to liven up the game. I'd argue that watching the fans at a match is more entertaining. We prefer a lot more action, a lot more contact, and no fake injuries. Don't get me wrong, an NBA player will take a dive in a heartbeat to draw a foul, but he won't roll around in agony and then suddenly be running full speed two minutes later. How can you, as a "football" fan, respect that nonsense???

I'll usually watch a few of the World Cup games, but I just haven't been able to get into soccer. Meanwhile, I have a brother who watches nothing but soccer...go figure!
Well mate you guys are outnumbered. It seems that the WORLD (i.e. everyone really) loves football (using your Feet to kick a ball equates to the term 'football'. American football funnily enough is mainly thrown by Hands). It isn't just across the pond. US stadiums are great but if you want to bag out the world game then buddy like is said you are in the minority. Billions not millions follow and play it in every country in the world. I love sports in general and played Basketball for my school (was even the mvp) but i'll be the first to admit that football is the king. That's not an opinion, that's stating facts. As a side note, the diving is really getting me angry too. Hopefully it will get rooted out of the game.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 12:32 AM   #793
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Zulu, you make a good point about the world wide popularity of soccer, but isn't that a function of the cost to play as much as anything? For someone in a third world country, soccer is the obvious choice because all you need is a ball and an open area. For these kids to play hockey or American football requires money they don't have.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 12:58 AM   #794
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Under that reckoning, wouldn't both forms of rugby be as popular as soccer as well? And Aussie rules as well? And GAA? There's a whole list of sports that are as easy / cheap to play, in equipment terms, as soccer is but don't have the same popularity, especially globally.

Don't get me wrong, I say this as a rugby fan, myself, but I'm happy to accept that rugby will never have the same popularity and world wide appeal that soccer does have. I think the same goes for any of the "indigenous" sports, really. Soccer is a world sport. Very few others really are and I doubt it's really anything to do with how much it costs to play it.

Honestly, the ease of comprehension of soccer is probably the main reason why it is so popular. The rules aren't complicated like they are for American Football or even rugby. There isn't a whole lot to football, at the most basic level, than kicking a ball in the right direction. No other sport has that ease of play.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 02:50 AM   #795
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^ that's the beauty of Football. It is very easy to play but difficult to master. It draws you in because of it's ease but you'll soon realise that there is a infinite potential and difficulty that's comes along with it. The foot would be the least intuitive appendage (let's keep if out of the gutter shall we) to use to control a circular ball. That's where it draws a person in to slave over it forever. Sure anyone can 'kick' a ball, but try to lift the ball up with your foot, bend the ball off the outside of your foot or flick it over your and the oppents head whilst running. Practise makes perfect.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 06:03 AM   #796
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I don't see any sport catching up to Football on a world wide basis. Situationally sports like Rugby, Australians rule, Cricket and American Football are dominant. Here in the states the MLS is starting to close in on the NHL interms of airtime and attendance, and the league has only been around for eleven or twelve years. If you are in India or Pakistan Cricket is The Biggest thing. In Australia Australian Rules and rugby are big (brilliant brutal game). In the USA American Football/Basketball/Baseball are dominant, in Canada its Ice Hockey. Football is the universal ind I think it will be for the foreseable future. To an extent rugby and basketball are global, but its not in the same way. Oh and flopping is the only thing that really bugs me about Football, some more bookings would probably fix that out though, especially guys like Drogba who can't wait to dive.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 10:17 AM   #797
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zrao0ROwpAM

Proves my point really.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 10:25 AM   #798
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Didn't see his hand of god goal last night then.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 10:40 AM   #799
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Well he is the next maradonna ain't he :P
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Old June 10th, 2007, 07:39 PM   #800
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Quote:
Originally Posted by b1gh0u5e View Post
Zulu, you make a good point about the world wide popularity of football, but isn't that a function of the cost to play as much as anything? For someone in a third world country, football is the obvious choice because all you need is a ball and an open area. For these kids to play hockey or American football requires money they don't have.
this is exacly why football is the worlds most popular sport. 'cause you only need one round ball. and basicly you can play it anywhere indead. it doesnt if its in the slops of Rio or Cape Town, or in the backyard of your big villa. doesnt mind. its the only one worlds common language. only yankees don't speak it like the whole other world.
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