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Old January 11th, 2009, 06:53 PM   #61
YelloPerilo
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That's the Jing An Temple.

"The first temple was built in 247 AD, at the time of the Kingdom of Wu, during the Three Kingdoms period. Originally located beside Suzhou Creek, it was relocated to its current site in 1216 during the Song Dynasty. The current temple was rebuilt once in the Qing Dynasty. It's most recent renovation was in late 2008."


Not sure if it qualifies as it isn't "new Chinese architecture", but rather an old renovated building.
This Jing'an Si is completly new. My friend bought the old temple and he will restore and re-erect it somewhere near Xintiandi.

BTW, the style of the new Jing'an Si is a mixture of Tang and Ming style. I like it very much.

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Old February 19th, 2009, 01:04 AM   #62
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Sorry not completely congruent with the subject title but here are some examples of new buildings conforming to the traditional characteristic of a city:











Preserving all this Chinese architecture is amazing and I hope this trend continues. I also would like to see Chinese cities that have a predominantly different characteristic preserve that unique style too. Qingdao made an excellent choice in building a new station in pseudo-German style rather than construct a post-modern glass monstrosity.

Harbin should build more Russian buildings, Qingdao more German, and Shanghai more neoclassical and baroque.
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Old February 19th, 2009, 03:22 AM   #63
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^yep those are part of Qingdao's colonial old city, built by the Germans in the 1920s. Harbin has some Russian style additions too for its colonial areas.
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Old February 20th, 2009, 09:47 PM   #64
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Harbin should build more Russian buildings, Qingdao more German, and Shanghai more neoclassical and baroque.
Shanghai is neither neoclassical nor baroque, Shanghai is is terms of quality and quantity an art deco city. Art deco is great style to blend in pre Qing style Chinese elements.
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Old February 20th, 2009, 10:04 PM   #65
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Yeah Shanghai is predominately Art Deco - it is said to be the city with the most Art Deco in the world (it would have been Tokyo had it not been destroyed during WWII).
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Old February 26th, 2009, 09:26 PM   #66
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Yeah Shanghai is predominately Art Deco - it is said to be the city with the most Art Deco in the world (it would have been Tokyo had it not been destroyed during WWII).
Yes but there are a lot of neoclassical buildings on the Bund
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Old February 26th, 2009, 11:55 PM   #67
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Yup, along with Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Neo-Classical, Beaux-Arts, and Art Deco (from Wiki).

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Old February 27th, 2009, 02:51 PM   #68
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Waitan is just a minuscule part of Shanghai and it boast a huge variety of architectural styles. The rest of Shanghai is pretty much art deco. There is no need to argue about that. But it's understandable, most people with a USAmerican education are quite clueless in this kind of things.
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Old June 2nd, 2009, 03:23 AM   #69
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^yep those are part of Qingdao's colonial old city, built by the Germans in the 1920s ...
Germans were there 1897 - 1914

*

drunkenmunkey888:
"Qingdao made an excellent choice in building a new station in pseudo-German style rather than construct a post-modern glass monstrosity."

It isn't a "new station" but an extension of existing old railway station.
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Old June 2nd, 2009, 10:16 PM   #70
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Forever Art Deco
A Tour of Asia's Architectural Gems

SHANGHAI

By Gordon Fairclough

For much of the world, the Great Depression of the 1930s brought misery: failed banks, hunger and joblessness. But for Shanghai, the decade was a golden age of prosperity that fostered artistic and cultural experimentation.

The melting-pot city's surging economy fueled a building boom that transformed it into a showcase for the architectural style meant to capture the excitement, promise and glamour of the machine age: Art Deco.

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A Virtual Tour
The interior of the Langham Yangtze Boutique Shanghai hotel after its $30 million renovation.

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An Architect's Path to Shanghai Shopping for Art Deco in Shanghai Art Deco's simplified, streamlined forms, thrusting vertical elements and geometric ornamentation captured the spirit of a rising city determined to secure its place in the modern world.

Deco buildings, many of them high-rises that towered above what was then, as now, China's most important commercial and financial center, quickly overshadowed more ornate Beaux Arts monuments to colonial power. Deco became the city's dominant architectural style.

Thousands of Deco structures -- hotels and theaters, apartment blocks and luxury villas -- are still standing, evoking the days when ocean liners anchored off Shanghai and European and Chinese grandees mingled with movie stars and gangsters in the city's jazz clubs and dance halls.

Born in 1920s Europe, the Art Deco aesthetic -- inspired by advances in technology and industry -- quickly spread across the Atlantic. From the Chrysler Building in New York to the pastel hotels of Miami Beach and the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles, Art Deco reshaped architecture in the years before World War II -- though the term wasn't coined until the 1960s, drawn from the name of the 1925 Paris decorative-arts exhibition that popularized the style.

Art Deco influenced the design of everything from airplanes to alarm clocks, ships to sofas. Even typefaces went Deco. Stripping away the often elaborate ornamentation of the architectural styles popular before World War I, it was a conscious effort to capture the spirit of modernity. Deco fell out of fashion when a new generation of designers took the idea a step further: Seeing even Deco's stripped-down decorative elements as excessive, they eliminated them altogether. The result was the modernist style, and postwar buildings of steel and glass.

Former colonial outposts across Asia harbor Art Deco gems -- from the former Banque d'Indochine building in Hanoi, which now belongs to the State Bank of Vietnam, to the Hotel Savoy Homann in Bandung, Indonesia. Such was Deco's allure that even the maharajah of Jodhpur in India used the style in a sprawling palace he built in the 1930s.

But few places in the world embraced Art Deco with the fervor of Shanghai, a city obsessed with fashion and fixated on being up-to-date -- in part because of the view, prevalent in China at the time, that only by modernizing could the country regain its strength and stand up to Western imperialism and a militant Japan.

"The architecture reflected the times," says Wu Jiang, an architect and former Shanghai urban-planning official whose grandfather was a U.S.-trained architect who worked in the city in the 1930s. "People felt that China needed new ideas, new things in order to develop. They wanted to say that they were advanced and modern."

The survival of so many of Shanghai's Art Deco treasures is thanks partly to economic stagnation following the Communist Party's victory in China's civil war in 1949. There was little new construction until the 1990s, so relatively few buildings were demolished, though some were damaged by Red Guards during the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and '70s.

More recently, preservation has gone from passive to active, with government planners and developers growing more interested in protecting and restoring once-neglected buildings as potential tourist draws. For instance, Shanghai city officials pressed the state-run company that owns the Peace Hotel, an Art Deco icon, to undertake a multimillion-dollar renovation. The hotel, which will be managed by Fairmont Hotels & Resorts, has not yet set a date to reopen.

It will join the Deco-style Yangtze Hotel, which reopened earlier this month after a $30 million gutting and renovation that aimed to restore its original glitz. The hotel, renamed the Langham Yangtze Boutique Shanghai, has 96 rooms and suites and features new Deco-inspired interiors -- along with modern amenities such as a spa.

"There are so many parallels between Shanghai in the 1930s and Shanghai now," says Russell Durnell, director of sales and marketing for special projects at Langham Hotels International of Hong Kong, which manages the Yangtze. The city is once again flourishing, cosmopolitan and experiencing a building boom. "The spirit of Shanghai in the 1930s -- the glamour, the fun -- resonates" with guests, he says.

Mr. Wu, the former city planner, says he expects the renovation trend to expand to other historic buildings in Shanghai.

For now, however, part of the allure of Shanghai for Deco aficionados is the general dilapidation of many buildings, which can give explorers the feeling at times of unearthing architectural fossils. Some of the city's formerly upscale villas and apartments languish in not-so-genteel decay, crowded with multiple families that moved in after the revolution. Facades are often hidden by drying laundry.

Once they were the stomping grounds of China's foreign and local capitalist elite -- grown rich on new industries such as textiles, trade and finance. At the time, Shanghai was divided into three parts: the Chinese city, the British-led International Settlement and the French Concession, the latter two legacies of the Opium Wars in the 19th century.

The city drew fortune seekers, dissidents, refugees and other migrants from around China and the world, attracted by its openness and vibrant economy. Russians fleeing revolution and its aftermath arrived in large numbers. It was a time of political, social and artistic ferment.

Among those who staked their futures on Shanghai was a British subject of Iraqi Jewish ancestry named Sir Victor Sassoon. He set up the family's business empire in Shanghai, where he became a real-estate mogul and hotelier.

Sir Victor's crown jewel was the luxurious Cathay Hotel, on the river side of Sassoon House; the other end of the building was devoted to offices and high-end shopping. The hotel -- with a tower topped by a sharply pitched pyramidal roof -- became the Art Deco trendsetter for Shanghai as soon as it opened its doors in 1929. Sir Victor lived in a penthouse suite overlooking the waterfront.

His Metropole Hotel, whose interior fittings still feature a Sassoon family emblem with its two greyhounds, rises at a nearby intersection -- across from its twin, Hamilton House, built by Sir Victor as a hybrid office building and high-rise apartment house. The pair was completed in 1934. Shanghai's smart set no longer strides the lobby, now dank and dirty, but the directory by the elevator still lists some old tenants in gold paint: "Smith, A. Viola," for one, and "Sailer, T.C. Capt." Another Deco building, a former bank headquarters, sits at the same intersection near the Bund, the riverside thoroughfare of Shanghai's old International Settlement.

"It's stunning. It's like a set from a 1940s movie," says Michael Kinerk, an Art Deco expert from Miami Beach, about this crossroads. Mr. Kinerk, who has been active in preserving and marketing Miami Beach's legendary Art Deco hotels, apartment buildings and homes, last month visited Shanghai for the third time, and says the city's sheer number of Deco building sets it apart: "It's monumental."

Many are still being used for their original purposes. You can take in a movie at the Deco-style Cathay Theatre, completed in the early 1930s, which has a neon-lit spire towering over its marquee, or dance in the ballroom of the Paramount dance hall, which opened at about the same time. You can even hire someone to dance with you, just like in the old days. (The price for a female partner is about $40 an hour; a male partner is about $75 for four hours.)

The 22-story Park Hotel, the tallest building in China when it opened in 1934, looms over People's Square -- once the oval of the city's horse-racing track. The hotel, designed by László Hudec, originally had a ballroom with a roof that retracted, for dancing beneath the stars. (See "The Hungarian Connection," page 12.) Next door on Nanjing Road is the recently renovated Art Deco Grand Theatre, also designed by Mr. Hudec, with a spacious lobby and sweeping staircase that leads patrons to the second-floor auditoriums.

But it is not only numbers that make Shanghai's Deco heritage unique. Over time, the city developed its own Deco style, fusing the myriad influences of its polyglot population into distinctive designs.

In Shanghai, architects from Britain, France and elsewhere -- Mr. Hudec was Hungarian, trained in Budapest -- mixed with the first generation of Western-trained professional Chinese architects. Many of these young Chinese started returning home in the 1920s and 1930s, imbued with Western ideas about modern design.

The Yangtze Hotel was designed by Li Fan, who studied architecture in Europe. Robert Fan, who studied architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, designed many buildings, including the Majestic Theatre, an important Deco landmark.

In Shanghai, architects and their clients were influenced by traditional Chinese building forms and motifs. In some cases, Deco styling was applied to traditional courtyard house structures. In others, traditional Chinese joinery patterns used in wood construction were mimicked in masonry.

Perhaps most obvious was the addition of Chinese motifs to the mix of decorative elements in architects' design repertoires of zigzags, curves and chevrons. Modernist geometric takes on traditional Chinese icons -- clouds, waves and mountains -- enlivened facades and interiors.

One of the clearest examples of the Shanghai Deco style is the old Bank of China headquarters building next to the Peace Hotel on the Bund. The building uses traditional Chinese window-lattices up its high-rise facade, and is topped with a tiled pagoda-like roof.

Shanghai also developed its own strain of Art Deco furniture, which local craftsmen and factories produced on a large scale for the city's burgeoning middle class. (See "Decorating in Deco.")

Art Deco's evolution in Shanghai is also clearly captured in the various strata of preserved buildings. The early influence of French Art Deco aesthetics can be seen in the stained-glass ceiling of the ballroom in the otherwise largely Beaux Arts-style old French Sports Club -- now the Okura Garden Hotel -- as well as in some other interior flourishes.

George Wilson, an architect with the Shanghai office of the firm Palmer & Turner, added Deco-style light fixtures to the Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corp. headquarters on the Bund, whose massive domed classical structure was already under construction when Deco started to become popular.

The next turn of the wheel can be seen in Mr. Wilson's Custom House, also on the Bund, begun after the HSBC building and completed in 1927. He introduced Deco elements into its soaring, relatively minimalist clock tower.

Mr. Wilson's next big commission was Sir Victor's Cathay Hotel. Renamed the Peace Hotel after the Communist government took it over, the building is now swathed in scaffolding as its renovation continues. (It's across Suzhou Creek from a later Palmer & Turner Building, the 22-story Broadway Mansions, completed in 1934 and now home of the Broadway Mansions Hotel.)

Ian Carr, principal of Hirsch Bedner Associates, the designers in charge of the job, says the aim is to provide "a very true Deco reinterpretation of the building." One of the biggest challenges, he says, has been determining what's original and what's not. Much was lost. During World War II, the building was occupied by Japanese officers. Later, as a state-run hotel, it suffered several poorly done renovations.

To go back 70 years, designers have been "peeling away the layers" -- in some cases literally. The ornate plaster ceiling of a room, designed to look like the interior of an imperial Chinese palace, was covered by multiple coats of paint, forming a deposit more than a centimeter thick. The ceiling, which had to be removed to allow the installation of a sprinkler system, will be copied and rebuilt.

Another challenge has been working around the legacies of state ownership. The entire second floor is devoted to a major China Telecom trunk line and phone equipment, which cannot be removed. The architects could not even install new elevator banks in the old building because they would interfere with the telecom facilities.

In trying to reconstruct the interior, HBA designers have drawn on old photographs. They plan to work with local artists to recreate the lobby's original murals, the work of a Russian painter, but the renovation is also adding distinctly contemporary elements, such as an incandescent blue sushi bar overlooking the main lobby.

In the end, Mr. Carr says, his firm hopes to create an interior that harkens back to the hotel's Deco roots, but is chic and trendy enough to draw today's customers. Fairmont, the company that will manage the property, "wasn't interested in running a dowdy, frumpy hotel," he says.

Whether they can pull it off and turn the hotel into a Deco moneymaker for a new era will have a lot of influence on how much the city government and others invest in renovations of other Deco structures. "There's a huge amount of pressure on us," says Mr. Carr. "The stakes are high."

Source: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124332244318553837.html
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Old June 3rd, 2009, 12:07 AM   #71
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Thanx to Herzarsan for this article, 2000 Shanghai buildings to be restored:

Luwan to preserve shikumens and build another Xintiandi[/SIZE]

By Yang Jian | 2009-5-18 | NEWSPAPER EDITION

SHANGHAI'S Luwan District will redevelop one of its shikumen (stone-gated) neighborhoods into another Xintiandi, the city's popular shopping, eating and entertainment area, within three years, the district's governor said yesterday.

And all the district's more than 2,000 shikumen buildings will be restored.

Some may be turned into business hubs such as Xintiandi, new residential areas such as the Cite Bourgogne community, or business and residential complexes such as Tian Zi Fang on Taikang Road, Governor Weng Zuliang told the first 2010 World Expo Shanghai public forum, which focused on the protection of shikumen buildings.

The district is still deciding where to build the "second Xintiandi" but run-down shikumen neighborhoods near downtown commercial areas that can no longer house residents will be the first choice, Weng said.

Xintiandi and Tian Zi Fang are both renovated old shikumen areas that now house boutique shops and restaurants.

Xintiandi makes 100 million yuan (US$14.65 million) in revenue every month, said Zhou Yongping, the president's assistant of the Hong Kong-based developer, the Shui On Group.

Shikumens that can still be used as residences will be restored like the Cite Bourgogne on Shaanxi Road S, Weng said.

The district will restore the facades, overhaul the plumbing and instal fire-protection systems. Renovations will be completed on 800 shikumens by the end of the year.

Wu Jiang, vice president of the city's Tongji University and an expert on cultural relics, told the forum that Xintiandi, Tian Zi Fang and Cite Bourgogne are the best three examples of restoration solutions for shikumens.

The scholars and government officials released a joint statement at the forum to preserve shikumens and use the buildings to create "greater social and economic benefits." Meanwhile, the Shanghai Shikumen Culture Research Center was established yesterday to publicize the history and culture of the buildings.

The city has also launched a Website (www.shikumen.org) on shikumen buildings.

Shikumens were initially built in the city as early as 1850s by European colonists in the foreign concessions to rent to Chinese residents.

At one stage, up to 80 percent of the city's population lived in this type of house.

The city government demolished most of the buildings in the early 1990s in its urban construction.

Source: http://www.shanghaidaily.com/sp/arti...cle_401189.htm
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Old August 22nd, 2009, 11:08 AM   #72
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updated 1st page
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Old August 25th, 2009, 04:55 PM   #73
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Xian

before:

image hosted on flickr



now:

braveheart
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Old August 26th, 2009, 02:08 AM   #74
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^ what exactly is going on here in these Xian pictures? Where is this?
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Old August 26th, 2009, 07:27 PM   #75
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china should build large plots with there old buildings ....meny of theme will be interesting to see skyscraper in old chinese style..that building in the top looks more to europeans style.
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Old August 26th, 2009, 08:31 PM   #76
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It's nice to see China finally bethinks itself of its own culture, architecture and history.

But while they're rebuilding some parts or build new historicising ones, they tear down real historical ones that partly stood for centuries. That's uncondonable.
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Old August 28th, 2009, 01:03 AM   #77
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for most of the projects see pages 1 and 2
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Old September 1st, 2009, 09:46 AM   #78
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Old structures can be beautiful:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hXtC...layer_embedded
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 12:57 PM   #79
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SUZHOU 苏州


Suzhou, the cradle of Wu culture, is one of the oldest towns in the Yangtze Basin. 2500 years ago in the late Shang Dynasty, local tribes who named themselves "Gou Wu" lived in the area which would become the modern city of Suzhou.

In 514 BC, during the Spring and Autumn Period, King Helu (闔閭/阖闾) of Wu established "Great City of Helu", the ancient name for Suzhou, as his capital. In 496 BC, Helu was buried in Huqiu (Tiger Hill 虎丘).
















































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Old September 2nd, 2009, 01:00 PM   #80
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SUZHOU 苏州




































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