daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 27th, 2008, 12:12 AM   #1
plotstyle
1+1=1
 
plotstyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: one world
Posts: 857
Likes (Received): 14

MISC | Escalators in metros

Question why are the spacings between escalators so large when they don't need to be??? example 1200mm instead of say 550mm

It is so they can perform maintenance from below or what???

I'm also looking for a cad block elevation of an metro train or ICE3 if anyone could point me in the right direction??? and any other information on designing metros fire exits platform widths in relation to capacity per hour ect

any help really appreciated....
__________________
city to city coast to coast...

Last edited by dimlys1994; March 17th, 2016 at 11:55 PM. Reason: more info
plotstyle no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 28th, 2008, 06:35 PM   #2
GENIUS LOCI
No More Italian Mod
 
GENIUS LOCI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Milano
Posts: 35,311
Likes (Received): 11118

Quote:
Originally Posted by plotstyle View Post
Question why are the spacings between escalators so large when they don't need to be??? example 1200mm instead of say 550mm
There are even tight escalators (I don't think 550 mm anyway)

In some metro (as in London or in Milan ones) you can find the explanation to your question clearly written



Invitation to stand right to allow walkin' on the escalator
__________________
URBANFILE
GENIUS LOCI no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2008, 07:06 PM   #3
diegodbs
Registered User
 
diegodbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Madrid
Posts: 530
Likes (Received): 20

Escalators in Madrid metro stations. (2 systems)

A.


B.

Last edited by diegodbs; July 28th, 2008 at 07:12 PM.
diegodbs no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2008, 08:06 PM   #4
Minato ku
Moderator
 
Minato ku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Paris, Montrouge
Posts: 16,746

Quote:
Originally Posted by GENIUS LOCI View Post
There are even tight escalators (I don't think 550 mm anyway)

In some metro (as in London or in Milan ones) you can find the explanation to your question clearly written

Invitation to stand right to allow walkin' on the escalator
It is not written in Paris metro, RER and other suburban train but everybody respect it (except the tourist ).
__________________
すみません !
J’aime Paris et je veux des tours !
Minato ku no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2008, 09:07 PM   #5
thib8500
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,876
Likes (Received): 770

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
It is not written in Paris metro, RER and other suburban train but everybody respect it (except the tourist ).
The last time I was in Paris (maybe in 2005), there were some "gardez votre droite" patches on the escalators.
thib8500 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2008, 09:19 PM   #6
diegodbs
Registered User
 
diegodbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Madrid
Posts: 530
Likes (Received): 20

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
It is not written in Paris metro, RER and other suburban train but everybody respect it (except the tourist ).
Same in Madrid, it is not written but respected everywhere except by tourists (unless the tourist comes from a city where people respect that custom too).
diegodbs no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2008, 09:28 PM   #7
Minato ku
Moderator
 
Minato ku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Paris, Montrouge
Posts: 16,746

Quote:
Originally Posted by thib8500 View Post
The last time I was in Paris (maybe in 2005), there were some "gardez votre droite" patches on the escalators.
You are right in the long walkway it is written, but not in the average escalator.
__________________
すみません !
J’aime Paris et je veux des tours !
Minato ku no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2008, 10:31 PM   #8
Martin S
Registered User
 
Martin S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 10,215
Likes (Received): 3139

I think Plotstyle's question related to the distance between escalators not the width of them.

I think the answer might be that escalators often work in opposing directions and so, if they were too close, anyone carrying a long object on the down escalator could easily hit someone on the up escalator. With the combined speed of the two escalators, it could be enough to cause a serious injury.

By the way, I was once told by an escalator engineer that escalators are not intended to be walked on. Everyone does it of course but as they do not have the same proportions as a regular staircase with respect to tread rise and length (going), they are not considered to be stairs for walking - as anyone knows who has to walk up or down a stopped escalator.

Platform widths depend on the number of passengers likely to use a station at peak hours and other factors such as the spacing of exits. One of the main problems on many London Underground tube stations is walking along a crowded platform to find a less crowded part.

Standards will vary from country to country but in Britain, the minimum width from the edge of a platform to any fixed object (noticeboard, seating etc) is 2.5m. However in the case of a metro style station, a minimum distance of 3m.would be adopted and, probably more. Island platforms should be a minimum of 5m wide.

I'm not too sure on the fire regulations situation but, here in Britain, any station that is partially enclosed is designated a sub-surface station. That not only applies to underground stations but also ones built under buildings - such as Birmingham New Street or the undercroft station for Manchester Metrolink. Large span roof stations with large amounts of air space, - such as London St Pancras are not included.

Sub-surface will have more onerous requirements with respect to emergency exits with at least one emergency exit route per platform. There is also a requirement that all materials used in the construction do not produce smoke or toxic fumes if burned and a sophisticated fire alarm system incorporating a fan assisted smoke extract sytem will be required at all new underground stations. Many of these requirements came in following the disastrous Kings Cross underground station fire in 1987 when passengers were suffocated from smoke from a burning timber escalator.
__________________

Last edited by Martin S; July 28th, 2008 at 10:42 PM.
Martin S está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2008, 10:57 PM   #9
Cosmin
Euro Mod
 
Cosmin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Bucharest
Posts: 17,285
Likes (Received): 5961

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
It is not written in Paris metro, RER and other suburban train but everybody respect it (except the tourist ).
In Bucharest metro it's written on the escalator, but nobody respects it (except Cosmin).
Cosmin no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2008, 11:09 PM   #10
Minato ku
Moderator
 
Minato ku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Paris, Montrouge
Posts: 16,746

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin S View Post
I think Plotstyle's question related to the distance between escalators not the width of them.
I see.
In Paris the oldest have a large distance between the two escalators, when this width is small in newer one.
__________________
すみません !
J’aime Paris et je veux des tours !
Minato ku no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2008, 12:04 AM   #11
micro
Registered User
 
micro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamburg, .de Home: everywhere
Posts: 1,258
Likes (Received): 106

I guess a large distance between escalators enables another escalator to be inserted later, when ridership increases, e.g. after an extension of the line.
micro no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2008, 05:02 AM   #12
Bitxofo
¡Viva el metro!
 
Bitxofo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Alderaan BCN BKK ATH PAR LON SYD SFO CPT TYO SCL CHC BUE SCG SVQ AGP BDN
Posts: 37,514
Likes (Received): 3653

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmin View Post
In Bucharest metro it's written on the escalator, but nobody respects it (except Cosmin).
Same here in Barcelona metro: nobody respects that except Bitxofo.
__________________
www.urbanrail.net
Εγώ είμαι ο Νταβόρ!!
David (DavoR for my friends)
川添 Kawazoe (riverside) 海斗 Kaito (big dipper of the ocean), in Japanese.
Yo si la ciudad no tiene metro, como que no es gran ciudad y entonces ya paso de vivir allí. Norreport+12000
Bitxofo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2008, 08:27 AM   #13
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

I would think you'd want space between escalators to improve circulation and allow for queuing space to use them. Usually, there is "peaked" demand to use the escalators with the arrival of a train, but the queue is less of a queue and more of a "fan" shape that funnels in, so you can end up with safety issues if there's not enough of a gap between the two...

Just imagine you're descending into a station on a down escalator with a rush of people getting off a train and heading for the up escalator... If the escalators were side-by-side, you'd essentially be trapped as you wouldn't be able to navigate the rush of people before others behind you needed to get off the escalator.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2008, 10:22 AM   #14
dösanhoro
Registered User
 
dösanhoro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Helsinki
Posts: 218
Likes (Received): 53

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
It is not written in Paris metro, RER and other suburban train but everybody respect it (except the tourist ).
Also very common. Tourists and mainly rural people of course might not know. Tourists sometimes cause a block because they apparently are not very aware of their surroundings

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post

Just imagine you're descending into a station on a down escalator with a rush of people getting off a train and heading for the up escalator... If the escalators were side-by-side, you'd essentially be trapped as you wouldn't be able to navigate the rush of people before others behind you needed to get off the escalator.
I try to imagine what would happen if escalators being right next to each other went both in the same direction. Anyone ever seen this setup?
dösanhoro no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2008, 10:50 AM   #15
Urbanus
Registered User
 
Urbanus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Copenhagen
Posts: 794
Likes (Received): 712

Quote:
Originally Posted by dösanhoro View Post
Also very common. Tourists and mainly rural people of course might not know. Tourists sometimes cause a block because they apparently are not very aware of their surroundings



I try to imagine what would happen if escalators being right next to each other went both in the same direction. Anyone ever seen this setup?
In Copenhagen Metro most escalators are right next to each other, but going in the same direction. There are two sets of escalators - two going down, two going up - in two different places of the station. The reason stated by the Metro Company, is to give a better passengerflow. I think it both have advantages and disadvantages. It does give a somewhat better flow, and prevent queuing. But on the other hand it forces all passangers to go in the same direction like if a train have arrived, and that does not always give the best flow as it gathers people in stead of spreading them.
Urbanus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2008, 07:34 PM   #16
micro
Registered User
 
micro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamburg, .de Home: everywhere
Posts: 1,258
Likes (Received): 106

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Just imagine you're descending into a station on a down escalator with a rush of people getting off a train and heading for the up escalator... If the escalators were side-by-side, you'd essentially be trapped as you wouldn't be able to navigate the rush of people before others behind you needed to get off the escalator.
Good point. People can make double speed on escalators (at least when walking on them), so where the escalators end, a corridor of double width is needed to accommodate the people.
micro no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2008, 07:35 PM   #17
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Quote:
Originally Posted by dösanhoro View Post
I try to imagine what would happen if escalators being right next to each other went both in the same direction. Anyone ever seen this setup?
I believe Moscow has this setup... I remember seeing four side-by-side (two up, two down) in pictures and videos, but I will defer to a Muscovite to evaluate how well it works.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2008, 10:31 PM   #18
deasine
=)
 
deasine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 2,452
Likes (Received): 57

Quote:
Originally Posted by dösanhoro View Post
I try to imagine what would happen if escalators being right next to each other went both in the same direction. Anyone ever seen this setup?
We've been doing trials in Vancouver oddly enough... where two escalators head in the same direction with the flow of traffic, forcing the opposing direction to use the stairs... It actually worked quite well and they are considering doing this...

I know in Hong Kong, some stations have three to four escalators, with the centre ones going down and the side ones going up. Or was it the other way around... either way I think that's smart.
deasine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2008, 10:52 PM   #19
Urbanus
Registered User
 
Urbanus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Copenhagen
Posts: 794
Likes (Received): 712

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
I believe Moscow has this setup... I remember seeing four side-by-side (two up, two down) in pictures and videos, but I will defer to a Muscovite to evaluate how well it works.
Stockholm also have stations with four escalators, two in each direction side by side, like in Östermalmstorg.
Urbanus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 31st, 2008, 03:01 AM   #20
jarbury
Resident Planner
 
jarbury's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Auckland
Posts: 3,795
Likes (Received): 24

They're probably future proofing in case they want to add more escalators in the future.
__________________
All opinions are my own and not my employer's (or anyone else's).
jarbury no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium