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Old January 14th, 2012, 01:34 PM   #4201
Jesús E. Salgado
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Mazatlán, Sinaloa

Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



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Old January 15th, 2012, 12:55 AM   #4202
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Mazatlán Sinaloa



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán






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Old January 15th, 2012, 11:56 AM   #4203
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Mazatlán Sinaloa



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán







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Old January 15th, 2012, 11:55 PM   #4204
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Mazatlán Sinaloa




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán







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Old January 16th, 2012, 08:23 AM   #4205
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Mazatlán,


Mazatlán, (pronounced “maz-it-LAWN”, with the stress on the last syllable), means “place of the deer” in the Nahuatl (Aztec) language,. It is a city of around half a million people, located on a long, flat stretch of the Pacific coast of Mexico, just to the south of the Tropic of Cancer and due east of the tip of the Baja peninsula. It is here that the cool waters of the deep Pacific meet those of the warm, shallow Gulf of California. You might think of Mazatlán as having one foot in the tropics and the other in the dryer, dessert climate to the north.

The summer months can be hotter and more humid than residents of the western US and Canada are accustomed to, but for much of the year, Mazatlán enjoys perfect weather with milder temperatures and lower humidity when compared with Puerto Vallarta, Zihuatanejo, Acapulco, or Cancun. On many days, a refreshing breeze blows in from the Pacific in the afternoon to keep the midday heat under control. I am told by some folks who should know, that even in the middle of summer, it is generally less uncomfortable than Houston, St. Louis or Miami.

I guess they all must hide in the “winter” when we visit Mazatlán, because we have yet to meet the local insect population. While we have heard that some of our six-legged friends do appear during the summer rainy season, the kinds of insect problems that plague many other beach areas in Mexico are, for some reason, mostly absent here.

Even before it became a major tourist destination, Mazatlán was famous for its superb sport fishing. Eight fleets of charter boats haul in about 8,000 to 9,000 marlin and sailfish each year. The ocean is great for swimming and surfing too. The sunsets are fabulous and for those of us who enjoy long walks, the beaches go on and on for miles, both to the North and to the South of the city. On most days, one can find completely deserted, palm tree-lined, golden strands only a short drive or long walk from the city center.

There are also many more, interesting things to do within a short distance. The rugged peaks of the Sierra Madre Occidental are clearly visible to the east. Tropical plantations, mountain jungle and mangrove swamps for wildlife viewing, are all close by, as are a couple of idyllic colonial pueblos. In one nearby town, artisans specialize in hand-crafted furniture which they sell at very reasonable prices. Local bus service to all surrounding areas is frequent and very inexpensive. Even though you can find just about anything you need in Mazatlán, big-city shopping and conveniences in Guadalajara are also only a short day’s drive to the South.

Mazatlán is easily accessible from the western US by air and by car or bus. Among Mexican destinations, it represents one of the shortest and least expensive flights from Los Angeles, San Francisco, Phoenix, Portland, Seattle and Vancouver with daily service available from several airlines. Those preferring to drive or ride in the incredibly inexpensive and comfortable (Primera Clase) Mexican buses, will find a 4-lane freeway (Maxipista) from the border at Nogales all the way to Mazatlán. The 743 miles can be covered in one long or two easy day's drive. There are a number of RV parks, (some right on the beach), that fill up with American and Canadian “snowbirds” every winter.
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Old January 16th, 2012, 09:39 AM   #4206
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The Invasion by the United States

The most surprising and I guess shocking discovery about Mexican history was the role that the United States played in conquering her southern neighbor. During the period from 1835 to 1853, Mexico wound up losing half of her territory to the US. It started when Mexico decided to outlaw slavery in a place called Texas, then part of Mexico.

Well the folks in Texas wanted their slaves, and declared independence and in 1845 became a state in the Union. Fighting began in 1846, and in 1848 Mexico surrendered after General Winfield Scott occupied Mexico City. Believe me, Mexicans remember the Alamo a lot more vividly than we do. As a result of the war, Mexico lost what we today call California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and Colorado. Not a small chunk, if I say so myself.


The Invasion by Maximilian of France

After the American conquest, and Indian named Benito Juarez emerged to become the biggest influence in Mexican politics. He was liberal, which upset the very conservative church and high Spanish officials. As provisional president Juarez began reforming. He took away the Roman Catholic church's property, created a separation between church and state, promoted freedom of speech, and other civil liberties. Then, after being elected president in 1861, he decided to suspend interest payments on the foreign loans incurred by previous governments. (Sound familiar?) Well, ripping off the church and letting a bunch of peasants speak up is one thing, but welshing on your debts is quite another. A coalition of France, Great Britain, and Spain decided to jump in and "protect" their investments.

The main force behind this was Napoleon III of France, who sent Maximilian, the archduke of Austria, to take over Mexico. Maximilian was installed by the French army, and some conservative Mexicans who had had enough of Juarez's reforms. Here another stranger than fiction event takes place. Maximilian insisted that he would only accept the crown if he was approved by the Mexican people. Puzzled by this request, the conservative Mexicans indulged him and promptly organized a plebiscite. With the French army watching, and the native population ignorant and apathetic, the election was held. Maximilian was pleased when the generals told him that his emperorship had been overwhelmingly approved. (Sound familiar?) We'll fast forward a few years later and find our emperor Maximilian at the wrong end of a firing squad.

C'est la vie.
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Old January 16th, 2012, 11:10 PM   #4207
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Mazatlán Sinaloa



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




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Old January 17th, 2012, 11:43 AM   #4208
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Mazatlán Sinaloa



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




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Old January 17th, 2012, 09:08 PM   #4209
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Mazatlán Sinaloa


Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán





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Old January 20th, 2012, 03:51 AM   #4210
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Mazatlán, Sinaloa


Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán






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Old January 20th, 2012, 11:50 AM   #4211
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Puerto de Mazatlan


The Puerto de Mazatlán lies on the north-central shores of western México east of the tip of Baja California in the State of Sinaloa. Meaning “place of the deer” in the Nahuatl language, the Puerto de Mazatlán is a popular tourist resort and an important commercial seaport. The Puerto de Mazatlán is home to agricultural-based industries like food processing and brewing; however, the port handles many industrial cargoes like rolled steel, containers, and automobiles. It also handles large volumes of bulk products and fish meal.

The Puerto de Mazatlán is a regular call for cruise ships and ferries that bring passengers back and forth between Baja California. Méxican and tourists from around the world come for sun and sand, water sports, sports fishing, and simply relaxing. The Puerto de Mazatlán is between Guadalajara and the US-México border, and it is well connected by road, rail, and air with cities in both countries. In 2005, over 350 thousand people lived in the Puerto de Mazatlán.

Port History

The area around the Puerto de Mazatlán was inhabited long before Europeans arrived there. Petroglyphs have been found on nearby islands that date back ten thousand years. The early inhabitants were nomads who settled in Mazatlán to hunt deer and fish. Unfortunately, pre-Spanish conquest records do not exist to tell the story of the area’s pre-history. The Spaniards arrived in the middle 16th Century.

The Puerto de Mazatlán was a small village and home to indigenous fishers until the early 1800s. In 1829, a Filipino established trade relations, and vessels began to arrive from the Asia Pacific, United States, Europe, Peru, and Chile. By 1836, about five thousand people lived in the Puerto de Mazatlán. Port records show that five ships arrived in 1826 from England, France, and another Méxican port. In 1827, nine ships came to the Puerto de Mazatlán from England, France, Sardinia, and two Méxican ports.

The US Army conquered and held the city during the Mexican-American War from 1846 to 1848 after the Mexican army abandoned the Puerto de Mazatlán to avoid having the city bombarded. Twenty years later, a French warship fired on the city without casualties.

While the US held the Puerto de Mazatlán, gold was discovered in California, and many immigrants came to the city, creating a new mercantile economy providing food, clothing, and equipment for the visitors. Many ships began to sail to San Francisco during that period. Between 1853 and 1875, of the 436 ships that departed the Port of San Francisco, 201 were bound for the Puerto de Mazatlán.

In the mid-19th Century, the Puerto de Mazatlán was part of the Mexican Empire ruled by Maximilian, and reminders of the French days can still be seen in the old town’s architecture. In 1866, General Ramón Corona (Spanish) drove the French from the Puerto de Mazatlán. In 1968, William Bridge from the United States illegally blockaded the Puerto de Mazatlán after authorities seized gold from the ship’s paymaster.

By the early 20th Century, about 600 ships arrived at the Puerto de Mazatlán every year, including huge steamboats and small sailing ships. Imports were bought with mining products. In the late 1890s, over $4 million in precious metals were exported through the Puerto de Mazatlán.

The Puerto de Mazatlán is the world’s second city to suffer aerial bombardment (after Tripoli, Libya). During the Mexican Revolution of 1910, a bi-plane dropped a leather-wrapped bomb made of dynamite and nails on Neveria Hill near downtown. Missing its target, the bomb killed two people.

The El Faro lighthouse in the Puerto de Mazatlán began operating in 1879. Made in Paris, the light was frequently mistaken for a star because it did not revolve. In 1905, the lamp was converted to revolve, saving many confused ships. Today, it shines for 30 nautical miles across the sea. Nearby, divers make breathtaking jumps from the cliffs for tips from tourists.

A magnet for sports fishers, the Puerto de Mazatlán was well-liked from the 1940s to the 1960s by Hollywood elite like Gary Cooper, John Huston, and John Wayne. Of course, many tourists followed those celebrities to the resorts. Tourism began to decline in the 1970s as newer vacation spots opened north of the Puerto de Mazatlán.

Today, the Puerto de Mazatlán is finding a new generation of tourists, both local and international. The city is undergoing a renaissance. Old fine homes are being restored, and new businesses are springing up.

Port Commerce

The Administración Portuaria Integral (API) de Mazatlan S.A de C.V. is the port authority for the Puerto de Mazatlán. API Mazatlán seeks to make the Puerto de Mazatlán a leader in maritime trade and logistical and industrial business to support both national and regional development while also protecting the ecological environment.

In 2008, the Puerto de Mazatlán handled over 93 million tons of foreign cargo, including about 57 million tons of imports and 36 million tons of exports. In the same year, the Puerto de Mazatlán handled over 163 million tons of cabotage.

The access channel to the Puerto de Mazatlán is 2500 meters long and 12 meters deep. The turning basin is 500 meters in diameter with a depth of 10 meters. With a total of 1426 meters of wharves, the Puerto de Mazatlán can support vessels to 300 meters in length. Two docks support fishing boats with 471 meters of berthing space at depths of four and eight meters. Four docks handle containers, automobiles, and passengers with berths of a total length of 826 meters and alongside depths from 8.5 to 10.5 meters. The Pemex oil company operates a 90-meter long dock with one berthing station for handling fluid cargoes, and Sematur operates a general cargo dock of 80 meters with two berthing positions.

The Puerto de Mazatlán contains five warehouses covering a total of almost 15 thousand square meters to store general loose goods. It also contains five open yards. Two yards of a total 26.5 thousand square meters handle automobiles. Two consolidation yards cover a total 23.3 thousand square meters, and a consolidation yard for general cargo and containers cover 18 thousand square meters. The Puerto de Mazatlán also has a cold shed of 90.8 thousand square meters with capacity to store 6.3 tons of perishable cargo.

Cruising and Travel

The City of Mazatlán is both economically and socially diverse. It is a popular retirement haven for people from the United States and Europe, and it supports a large community of working immigrants. The Puerto de Mazatlán is probably best known for its beautiful beaches, but there are many other things visitors will not want to miss.

Old Mazatlán, the downtown and historic area, is both interesting and charming. It contains the busy market (El Mercado) filled with shoppers and surrounded by a wide variety of street vendors and shops. This large center has everything from tourists’ t-shirts to traditional Mexican arts and crafts. A meat and fruit market in the center is frequented by locals.

A block southwest of the Mercado is the 1899 Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. This beautiful building is full of grace, both on the outside and the inside. Lit through stained glass windows, the interior glows with a mix of warm and cool hues. Because a Jewish family donated money for the building’s construction, Stars of David were placed in the top windows of the cathedral. With Renaissance domes, a hand-carved baroque triple altar, yellow tiled spires, and blue and gold Moorish motifs on the exterior, this is one of the most beautiful churches in the region.

The Parque Revolución is just south of the cathedral and next door to the Puerto de Mazatlán’s city hall. About two blocks south of that relatively unremarkable park is the city’s most beautiful area, Plaza Mechado, lined with sidewalk tables and wonderful restaurants. The 19th Century Teatro Angela Peralta is located on the square, and it offers many different dramatic and musical venues. Next door to the Teatro is a Spanish-language display that tells the story of the Puerto de Mazatlán’s history.

One of the Puerto de Mazatlán’s most popular attractions is the lighthouse (El Faro), the second highest operating natural lighthouse in the world. At 157 meters above sea level, you’ll need to be in good shape to make the hike.

The Acquario Mazatlán is located next to the Parque de la Ciudad and Parque Infantil. This aquarium has over 200 species of fish that include sharks, sea horses, and eels. One of the country’s best and biggest aquariums, visitors will find a lovely botanical garden with an aviary and a playground next door.
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Old January 21st, 2012, 08:43 AM   #4212
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Mazatlán, Sinaloa


Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán




Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán






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Old January 22nd, 2012, 01:19 AM   #4213
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Mazatlán, Sinaloa


Old Town
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Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Old Town
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Old Town
Viejo Mazatlán



Dolphin in the Continuity of Life statue in Mazatlan
Delfín en la Estatua de Continuidad de la Vida en Mazatlán





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Old January 22nd, 2012, 12:21 PM   #4214
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Mazatlán, Sinaloa



Continuity of Life statue in Mazatlan
Estatua de la Continuidad de la Vida en Mazatlán



Continuity of Life statue in Mazatlan
Estatua de la Continuidad de la Vida en Mazatlán





Continuity of Life statue in Mazatlan
Estatua de la Continuidad de la Vida en Mazatlán




Continuity of Life statue in Mazatlan
Estatua de la Continuidad de la Vida en Mazatlán



Monument to the Fishermen
Monumento a Los Pescadores







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Old January 23rd, 2012, 12:11 AM   #4215
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Mazatlán, Sinaloa



Dolphin in the Continuity of Life statue in Mazatlan
Delfín en la Estatua de Continuidad de la Vida en Mazatlán



Dolphin in the Continuity of Life statue in Mazatlan
Delfín en la Estatua de Continuidad de la Vida en Mazatlán




Dolphin in the Continuity of Life statue in Mazatlan
Delfín en la Estatua de Continuidad de la Vida en Mazatlán




Dolphin in the Continuity of Life statue in Mazatlan
Delfín en la Estatua de Continuidad de la Vida en Mazatlán




Sam's Club
Club Sam's




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Old January 23rd, 2012, 10:07 AM   #4216
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Mazatlán, Sinaloa

Monument to the Virgin Mary
Monumento a la Virgen María



Monument to the Virgin Mary
Monumento a la Virgen María




Fisherman's Monument
Monumento al Pescador



Fisherman's Monument
Monumento al Pescador




Fisherman's Monument
Monumento al Pescador





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Old January 23rd, 2012, 11:57 PM   #4217
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Mazatlán, Sinaloa


Monument to the Mazatlan's women
Monumento a la Mujer Mazatleca



Monument to the Mazatlan's women
Monumento a la Mujer Mazatleca




Monument to the Mazatlan's women
Monumento a la Mujer Mazatleca




Monument to the Mazatlan's women
Monumento a la Mujer Mazatleca




Monument to the Mazatlan's women
Monumento a la Mujer Mazatleca



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Old January 24th, 2012, 10:32 AM   #4218
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thanks for the great updates from Mexico....
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Old January 24th, 2012, 12:38 PM   #4219
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Mazatlán, Sinaloa


Monument to the Mermaid
Monumento a la Sirena




Monument to the Mazatlan's women
Monumento a la Mujer Mazatleca



Balboa Towers
Balboa Towers




Balboa Towers
Balboa Towers



Saylor's Monument
Monumento a Los Marineros




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Old January 24th, 2012, 11:49 PM   #4220
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Ferrusquilla's Monument
Monumento a Ferrusquilla



Pulmonia's (Tropical Taxi) Monument
Monumento a la Pulmonia (Taxi Tropical)




Lola Beltrán's Monument
Monumento a Lola Beltrán



Centenario Paseo, Cannon in Mirador Park
Paseo del Centenario, cańon en El Mirador



Centenario Paseo, Cannon in Mirador Park
Paseo del Centenario, cańon en El Mirador



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