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Old February 9th, 2013, 07:32 AM   #4881
Jesús E. Salgado
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México City's National Palace



The National Palace in Mexico City, or Palacio National in Spanish, has been the official seat of the Mexican government ever since the Aztec empire was in power from 1325 to the year 1521. The site is located along the entire eastern edge of the central plaza of the city, which is commonly referred to as the Plaza de la Constitucion or Mexico City Zocalo. In addition to being the seat of the federal government, the National Palace Mexico City also houses the Federal Treasury, the National Archives, and the president’s offices. The Palace in Mexico City also functions somewhat as a museum. Visitors can view original paintings by the Mexican artist Diego Rivera as well as displays with government artifacts. Visiting the National Palace is one of the many interesting things to do on a Mexico City day trip.

A tour of the Palacio National will reveal a seemingly endless number of courtyards, elaborate stairways, and carved-brass balconies. By touring various sections of the palace, it is interesting to note the changes that have occurred throughout the building in the last 300 years. The most recent addition to the Palace in Mexico City was in the late 1920s when the top floor was added.

A tour of the Palacio National will reveal a seemingly endless number of courtyards, elaborate stairways, and carved-brass balconies. By touring various sections of the palace, it is interesting to note the changes that have occurred throughout the building in the last 300 years. The most recent addition to the Palace in Mexico City was in the late 1920s when the top floor was added.

The history of Palacio National has seen its share of ups and downs. The Palacio National’s northern Mariana door, which is named after the mid-nineteenth-century President Mariano Arista, once opened up to several prisons, courtrooms, and torture chambers. It now contains the offices of the treasury as well as the Finance of Ministry.

Perhaps the most notable feature is the main balcony that faces the Zocalo. This is place where the Grito de Delores, commonly referred to as the Mexican Independence Ceremony, is celebrated. The ceremony, celebrated each September 15 at 11:00 p.m., involves ringing the bell that was originally sounded as a call for rebellion against Spain.

Although most sections of the building have been remodeled through the years, the murals of twentieth-century artist Diego Rivera remain in their original states. The murals were painted over a period of 25 years and depict various scenes from the history of Mexico. One of the most detailed pieces of the collection is a mural that depicts Mexican history from 1521 to 1930. The mural, which fills an entire wall, has images that are important to Mexico's past such as an eagle, a Mexican flag, and important leaders. If you like the work of Diego Rivera, you may want to take a visit to the nearby Frida Kahlo Museum. Frida Kahlo was another well-known Mexican painter and was the wife of Diego Rivera.

The National Palace Mexico City is open every day of the week except on Sundays. If you wish to avoid the crowds, it’s best to visit on weekdays. English speaking tour guides are available for a modest fee. A trip to the National Palace Mexico City is an excellent way for adults and children to learn about the history and governmental structure of Mexico. Whether you spend an hour or a day touring the palace in Mexico, you’ll learn about the challenges and changes that Mexico has encountered through the years.

A trip to the National Palace Mexico City is an excellent way for adults and children to learn about the history and governmental structure of Mexico. Whether you spend an hour or a day touring the palace in Mexico, you’ll learn about the challenges and changes that Mexico has encountered through the years.
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Old February 9th, 2013, 01:11 PM   #4882
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México, Distrito Federal

Mexican Institute of the Social Security (IMSS)
Insituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMMS)






Mexican Institute of the Social Security (IMSS)
Insituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMMS)





Mexican Institute of the Social Security (IMSS)
Insituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMMS)



Mexican Institute of the Social Security (IMSS)
Insituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMMS)



Mexican Institute of the Social Security (IMSS)
Insituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMMS)





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Old February 10th, 2013, 12:28 AM   #4883
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México, Distrito Federal

Central Offices of the Mexican Institute of the Social Security (IMSS)
Oficinas Centrales del Insituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMMS)



Mexican Institute of the Social Security (IMSS)
Insituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMMS)




Mexican Institute of the Social Security (IMSS)
Insituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMMS)



Mexican Institute of the Social Security (IMSS)
Insituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMMS)



Mexican Institute of the Social Security (IMSS), Cultural Center Eafael Solana
Insituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMMS), Centro Cultural Rafael Solana





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Old February 10th, 2013, 08:53 AM   #4884
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Dang, the Social Security Institute building looks pretty massive! I initially thought that it is a medical center, but it seems like a mix of government departments and lawyer offices exist in the building.
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Old February 10th, 2013, 09:08 AM   #4885
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There are lots of massive Social Security Hospitals, some have offices on them.
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Old February 10th, 2013, 09:13 AM   #4886
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Oh, so those Social Security hospitals are publicly-owned, like, say, San Francisco General or any one of those community health clinics? Which Social Security hospital is the biggest in Mexico, and why are those hospitals called such when I know Social Security is the program where members contribute a part of their wage and the government provides subsidized services? Why can't they call them general hospitals instead?
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Old February 10th, 2013, 09:26 AM   #4887
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No the Social Security clinics and buildings are government owned and run. The offices I am talking about are medical offices, with patient records.
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Old February 10th, 2013, 09:28 AM   #4888
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesús E. Salgado View Post
No the Social Security clinics and buildings are government owned and run. The offices I am talking about are medical offices, with patient records.
Oh ok. And are those doctors hired by the government too, similar to the VA system here?
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Old February 10th, 2013, 10:37 AM   #4889
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Yes, plus they have their own clinics on the outside.
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Old February 11th, 2013, 01:12 AM   #4890
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México, Distrito Federal

High Rise
Rascacielos



National Palace Mural
Palacio Nacional Mural



La Salle University
Universidad La Salle



Zocalo on a rainy day
Zocalo en dia lluvioso



Zocalo y Palacio Nacional on a rainy day
Zocalo y Palacio Nacional en dia lluvioso





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Old February 11th, 2013, 12:01 PM   #4891
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México, Distrito Federal

Skyrisers
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Skyrisers
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Skyrisers
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Skyrisers
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Cathedral
Catedral




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Old February 12th, 2013, 02:20 AM   #4892
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There are Social Security Hospital in every city of the country.
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Old February 12th, 2013, 12:42 PM   #4893
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México, Distrito Federal

Skyrisers
Rascacielos



Skyrisers
Rascacielos




Skyrisers
Rascacielos




Skyrisers
Rascacielos



Skyrisers
Rascacielos




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http://www.skyscrapercity.com/newrep...e=1&p=24626612

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http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=786986
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Old February 12th, 2013, 11:10 PM   #4894
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Aarhusforever ¿what country do you live in?
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Old February 13th, 2013, 03:33 AM   #4895
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Wonderful skyscraper shots yet again! I truly want to see a built up Santa Ana District pretty soon and compare it with Avenida de la Reforma.
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Old February 13th, 2013, 10:51 AM   #4896
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History of Santa Fé District

Santa Fe is one of Mexico City's major business districts, located in the west part of the city in the delegaciones (boroughs) of Cuajimalpa and Álvaro Obregón. Paseo de la Reforma and Constituyentes are the primary means of access to the district from the central part of the city. Santa Fe consists mainly of highrise buildings surrounding a large shopping mall, which is currently the third largest mall in Latin America (Centro Comercial Santa Fe). The district also includes a residential area and three college campuses, among other facilities.

The current area of Santa Fe took its name from the nearby town of Santa Fe, the original Pueblo Hospital founded by Vasco de Quiroga in 1532.

Colonial period and Independence

During the Spanish colonial era and the first century of independent Mexico, the then town of Santa Fe had an open landscape of sand mining activity, which was divided between the towns of Santa Fe, Santa Lucia, San Mateo and San Pedro Tlaltenango Cuajimalpa. Santa Fe was also connected by the former royal road connecting Tacubaya to Toluca, This royal road was located on the present day avenue called Cuajimalpa Arteaga and Salazar in the Sierra de las Cruces and continued by the current route of the federal interstate highway connecting Mexico City to Toluca.

During the Porfiriato a trolley was built on the former royal road, which at first ended at Santa Fe, and later expanded to La Venta, Cuajimalpa, and San Ángel, many trees were removed during this construction of the trolley line towards San Angelo.

1930s and 1940s

In the 1930s, the presence of sandbanks in the area caused their exploitation to fill the growing construction industry in Mexico City.

The biggest was that the extraction of sand created a gap of almost 4 km long by 2 km wide and in some places up to 100 m depth.

Another was the diversion of the river Tacubaya by federal highway to Toluca, leaving no water sources that could be used to supply water to the river as this feeds the area of Lomas. Natural flows and to make the drainage of the area by gravity.

Another point was that by abrupt changes in level, the area is very limited in natural areas for building roads, as has the barrier north of the neighborhoods that were created and east and west the presence of ravines, while the national park south of the Desert of the Lions.

Another point was that being a landfill on a hard floor, the introduction of potable water lines are in danger of contamination by leachate that can not move the site, together that the mechanical weakness of these soils makes difficult the introduction of drainage lines, and that soil settlements are in danger of breaking and increasing soil pollution, which continue to produce gas to be released every so often .


1950s

In 1953, after a derailment where several were killed in what is now the colony's Ocote Cuajimalpa, electric train service was withdrawn. the old royal road to Toluca already had by then strong competition from road federal Toluca, which runs along the west ridge which had to be stopped to avoid the collapse of the road. Today, in the south of the Calle 16 de Septiembre, one can see the outline of the path that requires them to leave the eastern ridge bordering the area and who once was a slum called Romita. This right of way gave rise to the Avenida Tamaulipas which connects with the road from Santa Lucia and the Basque avenue de Quiroga.


1960s

In the 1960s, sand deposits became difficult to exploit because the reinforcements of the walls were increasingly difficult and costly, so the mine owners began to sell the mines to the Federal District, which the use as a landfill. Contrary to what is said, from the northern edge of Santa Fe Shopping Center to the area of the colony was used as Pena Blanca dump, even on the side of Cuajimalpa with tunnels that cross to walk of Tamarind, was a mess that was duly closed and locked when President José López Portillo built his residential complex in the popularly called "Dog Hill".
1970s

In the early 1970s, an urban development plan was created for the area, which would be built in an industrial zone in the area to provide jobs to locals and develop import substitution, between what is planned consider creating the social rehabilitation center west "Ceres" like those built in the north, south and west of Mexico City. This plan did not consider the construction of residential areas as it was anticipated the weak capacity to carry water or drainage out of the area. This even had to be ratified by the boards of neighbors from the surrounding towns.
1980s

In the 1980s, most landfills had been closed and construction of buildings had begun.

It is in 1982 that Universidad Iberoamericana was built on land donated by the Santa Fe unity government, which marks the change from industrial to residential area of great economic level, as initially think.
1990s

During the administration of President Salinas de Gortari (1988–1994), the mayor of the city, Manuel Camacho Solís, and his colleagues devised a project that in theory would be similar to the edge city of La Défense in Paris, which would be located on existing landfills. A major risk due to building on existing landfills was the spread of contaminated water that would slip into Mexico City's water supply. Modern building techniques had to be initiated to spread several flattened layers of sand over millions of tons of garbage. To safely build upon the landfill, the City created a modern Master Program which the government and investors regulate.

It is in this decade that a construction boom began with the arrival of the Santa Fe Mall. At this time and under the authority of Manuel Camacho Solís, evictions were issued to the dwellers of Romita and other neighborhoods. Most of the dwellers have resettled in the San Jose neighborhood at Cuajimalpa. Through this avenue there is access to Tamaulipas and there started the construction of the toll highway Mexico-Toluca, which was to be extended on the outskirts of the city to reach the highway to Cuernavaca.

As a result of the economic crisis in Mexico in 1994, the master plan was halted and it was not until 2000 when the first phase of Santa Fe City was reinstated. Another of Santa Fe's original projects was cancelled, the so-called "Mountain Meadows Park", as the West Alameda Park; there are three other Alameda Parks in the northern, eastern, and southern parts of Mexico City.

2000s

The inadequate road infrastructure, energy, hydro power, which was originally planned for a residential zone, and residents, generated active participation in solving their basic problems, so they propose and manage a new organization where they create a sort of government procedure in which a special item given: the GDF without telling borough governments, leading to coordination problems. For example, for drinking water can not connect to networks and to get their Cuajimalpa sewage cannot connect to networks of Álvaro Obregón and no treatment plant exists in proximity. Hence the new Government of Ontario "GDF" has presented proposals for solution, as a road tunnel that starts from the Roma to City Santa Fe, which fail to be viable the high economic investment.

For those circumstances, in 2011, the possibility of creating a new office in the area is considered. The new borough of Mexico City was seen more as a way of validating the almost self-government in the area for the trust that manages it because the proposal covers only residential and commercial areas of high economic level, excluding the low level found on its periphery, which are part of the problem, since that is where are the roads and networks that feed the area.
Santa Fe's Trust

Along with the creation of Santa Fe industrial project in the 1970s was created a trust, where the government of the then Federal District "DDF" participate with their respective offices responsible for urban development, giving investors the facilities in the area electricity, lighting, roads, water and drainage to install its industry. But with the change of plans the plans were modified the characteristics of flows and inflows, which have great impact on the area. In 1994 the Association of Settlers Zedec Santa Fe, CA with the first investors in this development, among these we have:

Automotriz Hermer, SA of C.V.
Banca Serfin, SA of C.V.
Impulsora Corporate Real Estate, SA of C.V.
Corporate Option Santa Fe II, SA of C.V.
Universidad Iberoamericana, A.C.
Santa Fe Park, SA of C.V.
Property Home, SA of C.V.
Hewlett Packard de Mexico, SA of C.V.

Residents created the Association of Settlers Zedec Santa Fe in 1999, to present a common front to the problems that were found in the area.

On February 23, 2004 under the government of Marcelo Ebrard, who had been Secretary to the Government of the DDF under the government of the regent Manuel Camacho Solis, with infrastructure problems and challenges for the Federal District to meet the objectives of the original trust was created the Trust Colon de Santa Fe, constituted by the Government of the District Federal and Settlers Association Zedec Santa Fe This is because in its origin was an urban infrastructure development, where the federal government represented by the DDF was responsible for providing urban infrastructure for industrial use, even thought to use the right of way of the old railroad to build a radio station, connecting the cities of Toluca and Mexico. Something similar to the current Rail Commuter of the Metropolitan Area of Mexico Buenavista - Cuautitlan. Which is partly drawn from the current highway. For this reason it has kept the local governments out of both the administration and budgets have been invested in the area by the government. Not to mention that some areas for security reasons are closed to the public way, has had to hire police corps and industrial bank, has had to provide water supply service pipes and removal by sewage pipes also.

The agreement invested amounts are a percentage of property tax and are subject to review and approval expressed by the technical committee as the highest authority of the trust and trustee, this is composed of 7 members of which 4 are appointed by the association and the 3 remaining the Federal District government and decisions are taken by majority vote and at least 1 of the GDF with the president casting vote in case of tie and extraordinarily many times as needed.
Area statistics

Divided into 10 sectors: Downtown, Cruz Manca, La Fe, La Loma, La Mexicana, Totolapa, Paseo de las Lomas, Peña Blanca, Bosques de Santa Fe and the School Zone
13.80% of the total area of offices in the city
Commercial rent between 20 and 25 dollars per square meter in a class A+ (highest-ranked) building
70,000 employees
4,311 resident families
8 million shopping mall visitors per year
4 universities: Universidad Iberoamericana was the first in the zone.
13,500 students
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Old February 13th, 2013, 11:45 PM   #4897
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México, Distrito Federal

Skyrisers
Rascacielos



Skyrisers
Rascacielos




Skyrisers
Rascacielos



Skyrisers
Rascacielos




Skyrisers
Rascacielos





---------------------------------------------------
Visit this posts to get to know how the city of Los Angeles developed through the years

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http://www.skyscrapercity.com/newrep...e=1&p=24626612

Evolution through time of Los Angeles California
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=786986
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Old February 14th, 2013, 01:08 PM   #4898
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México, Distrito Federal

Skyrisers
Rascacielos



Skyrisers
Rascacielos




Skyrisers
Rascacielos



Skyrisers
Rascacielos



Skyrisers
Rascacielos




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Visit this posts to get to know how the city of Los Angeles developed through the years

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Evolution through time of Los Angeles California
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=786986
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Old February 15th, 2013, 03:40 AM   #4899
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México, Distrito Federal

Pedestrian street
Calle peatonal



Pedestrian street
Calle peatonal




Pedestrian street
Calle peatonal




Pedestrian street
Calle peatonal




Pedestrian street
Calle peatonal






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Old February 15th, 2013, 12:07 PM   #4900
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México, Distrito Federal


Chapultepec Castle
Castillo de Chapultepec




Chapultepec Castle
Castillo de Chapultepec





Chapultepec Castle
Castillo de Chapultepec



Chapultepec Castle
Castillo de Chapultepec



Ruins of an aqueduct in the city
Ruinas de un acueducto en la ciudad





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