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Old February 17th, 2008, 09:13 AM   #2401
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Press Release

Passenger Traffic Grows 13.5% in January

(Hong Kong, 17 February 2008) - Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) had a busy January with passenger traffic reaching 4 million, up 13.5% from January 2007.

Stanley Hui, Chief Executive Officer of Airport Authority Hong Kong, said it was a good start to the year. "We saw sharp increases in the number of visitors from Europe, the Chinese Mainland, South East Asia and South Korea. In addition, holiday traffic started to move early before the Lunar New Year holidays, with significant growth in the number of transfer passengers travelling between the Mainland and Taiwan and between the Mainland and destinations in South East Asia."

Strong pre-holiday demand from Europe and South East Asia saw cargo throughput reach 295,000 tonnes, an 8.9% increase from last January. Air traffic movements rose 5.3% from January 2007, to 24,800.

For the 12 months ended 31 January 2008, HKIA handled 48.3 million passengers and 3.8 million tonnes of cargo and recorded 296,770 air traffic movements. This represented year-on-year increases of 8.5%, 5.2% and 5.7%, respectively.

http://www.hongkongairport.com/pr_download/Jan2008e.pdf
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Old February 18th, 2008, 10:31 AM   #2402
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that's a nice increase for passenger at Jan.
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Old February 19th, 2008, 12:02 PM   #2403
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Fliers should offset emissions to counter traffic surge, activists say
18 February 2008
South China Morning Post

The Airport Authority should spearhead an emissions-offsetting campaign because of the recent surge in air traffic, a green group said yesterday.

Hong Kong International Airport handled 3,995,000 passengers last month, up 13.5 per cent on January last year. From February 7 to February 10 - over the Lunar New Year - 1,477 passenger flights departed.

Green Sense estimated that the outbound planes emitted 150,064 tonnes of carbon dioxide while travelling 4.5 million kilometres.

"Carbon dioxide is easier to soak up with trees if it is emitted at ground level, but much harder when discharged high in the sky by planes," group president Roy Tam Hoi-pong said.

He said about 600,000 trees would have to be planted to offset the 150,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide emitted during the first four days of the Lunar New Year, assuming that each tree would absorb 0.3 tonnes of carbon dioxide in 30 years.

He urged the Airport Authority, airlines and travel agencies to spend 10 per cent of their profits on carbon-neutral programmes to reduce the rate of climate change.

Carbon-neutral action meant investing in tree planting and renewable energy projects such as wind power and solar energy to offset carbon dioxide emissions, Mr Tam said.

He said a quarter of 40 airlines surveyed were taking part in carbon neutral programmes.

They included British Airways, Cathay Pacific, Dragonair and Qantas.

Mr Tam said travellers could pay an extra fee to support the programmes when they bought their ticket.

"It is not yet widely known as there is not much promotion," he said. "The airlines with such programmes should strongly advocate it for the good of our environment."

He also called on Hongkongers to avoid taking flights whenever possible.

"If you must fly, you should pay more to back carbon-neutral campaigns to offset the emissions and choose closer travel destinations if possible," he said.

Mr Tam also suggested holidaymakers travel by train or car whenever possible.

An Airport Authority spokes-woman said the public's opinions were welcome but did not say if it would consider the green group's suggestion.
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Old February 21st, 2008, 03:15 AM   #2404
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New heliport poised for liftoff in Wan Chai
Noise concerns played down

20 February 2008
South China Morning Post

Permanent heliport facilities will finally be realised in the heart of Hong Kong, paving the way for more convenient commercial short-haul travel despite worries about noise and pollution.

The government will seek funding for the proposed Wan Chai heliport from the Legislative Council by the middle of this year.

The project is estimated to cost HK$23 million.

It includes three pads for government and commercial use at the northeastern corner of the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre site.

No reclamation is necessary.

Robbie Brothers, chairman of the Hong Kong Regional Heliport Working Group, said the project was not contentious but had not really been a priority of the government, especially since the Government Flying Service (GFS) had the use of a temporary helipad at the former Wan Chai Public Cargo Working Area.

The Central Helipad facilities in Lung Wui Road, Admiralty, were closed in January 2004 for reclamation work.

The group, which represents the local helicopter industry, has been pushing for a permanent heliport in the central business district.

The government plans to brief Wan Chai District Council on the project next month before seeking funding approval from Legco's public works subcommittee and Finance Committee by the middle of the year.

Raymond Ho Chung-tai, who chairs the public works subcommittee and is a member of the Finance Committee, said a heliport should be conveniently located in the central business district and not just at the Macau ferry terminal in Sheung Wan, which is not close to urban areas.

He also said the cost should not be a problem as the project would be tendered out.

The government has told the group that the use of the heliport would be shared but absolute priority had to be given to government emergency and other essential flying services at all times.

"We have no qualms about giving way to emergency services," Mr Brothers said. "But the GFS said no commercial operator can use the facilities when its helicopters are using it, not even the parking pad. This is impractical and creates unnecessary flights, adding to costs and creating more noise."

The consultant report said the noise impact of the heliport on Causeway Centre, which is the nearest residential building at 450 metres away, was 74 decibels, within the 85-decibel limit specified in the Hong Kong Planning Standards and Guidelines. Strong winds created by helicopter use could also be mitigated by a barrier, the report concluded.

Avid aviator Sir Michael Kadoorie, who provides limited rooftop helicopter services at The Peninsula hotel in Tsim Sha Tsui, has long supported helicopter travel, saying helicopters are more suitable than corporate jets for flying times of less than one hour.
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Old February 21st, 2008, 02:30 PM   #2405
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HK Gov't Press Release:
LCQ5: Extension of franchises for air cargo terminals
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Old February 22nd, 2008, 03:28 AM   #2406
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I really question the location of that helipod. You are putting it right next to a tourist attraction. WTH.
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Old February 29th, 2008, 08:14 PM   #2407
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Involve airlines in feasibility study for third HKIA runway, says Cathay Pacific Chief Executive
Wednesday, February 27, 2008

Cathay Pacific Chief Executive Tony Tyler stressed a need for airlines to be involved in the feasibility study for a third runway at Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA). Speaking at the "Greener Skies" conference in Hong Kong, Mr Tyler said that airlines know as much, if not more, than anyone about airports and "we should be a key player in the debate".

Mr Tyler said that Hong Kong is by far the most successful and efficient hub in a rapidly-expanding aviation enclave in the Pearl River Delta, where five airports operate. While there was an understanding of the need to support the coordination of the future development of aviation services in the delta region, he stressed this should not happen at the expense of the Hong Kong hub.

HKIA, he said, is already heavily slot-constrained for most of the day and moves to increase movements through the use of new air-traffic control equipment will only delay the day when Hong Kong's airport becomes fully slot constrained. That, said Mr Tyler, would mean HKIA becoming sidelined as other regional hubs predominate.

"Hubs like Guangzhou and Shanghai are planning third, fourth and even fifth runways: Hong Kong faces the very real danger of gifting our competitive advantage away unless we move quickly and decisively on the third runway," Mr Tyler said. "The success of the Hong Kong hub is critical to the long-term health of the Hong Kong economy. Strangle the hub and you'll squeeze a good deal of life out of the Hong Kong economy as well."

Commenting on plans to develop a rail link between Hong Kong International Airport and Shenzhen Airport, Mr Tyler said that while a this could address some of Hong Kong's needs, it would at best be complementary to a third runway at HKIA.

"Why would travellers want to come to Hong Kong and get on a train into the Mainland to pick up another flight when they can do it at HKIA as they do now? The rail link certainly would not be a substitute for that third runway," Mr Tyler stated.

In his speech at the "Greener Skies" conference – organised to enable Asia Pacific airlines to form a coordinated response to the current environmental debate – Mr Tyler addressed a number of areas relating to aviation's contribution to carbon dioxide emissions and highlighted the work that's being done by airlines, including Cathay Pacific, to limit their impact on the environment.

On an issue of great concern to the aviation industry – the European Union's plans for an emissions trading scheme – he said that Cathay Pacific supports the industry position on emissions trading and believes a "cap and trade" approach is the way forward.

"But we couldn't agree more with the industry in robustly opposing the extra-territorial notion that airlines entering EU air space should be charged for their emissions from the moment they turn over their engines at the point of departure," Mr Tyler said. "That proposal simply defies logic and any sense of fair play. It is surely right that we need a global scheme to which we can all sign up, and not have the EU imposing its solutions on the rest of the world," Mr Tyler said.

The Chief Executive recapped the work being done at Cathay Pacific on a number of fronts to minimise the environmental consequences of its operations including engaging stakeholders through its corporate social responsibility commitment, addressing inefficiencies in air traffic management and enhancing the fuel efficiency of its fleet.

Cathay Pacific also became the first Asian airline to introduce a carbon offset scheme in December last year. Through the "FLY greener" programme, the airline – along with its sister carrier Dragonair – enables passengers to offset their travel using either cash or Asia Miles, with the offsets used to fund a wind farm project near Shanghai.
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Old March 2nd, 2008, 05:37 AM   #2408
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Report: Pilot responsible for Continental plane's tail strike on takeoff at Newark airport
29 February 2008

NEWARK, New Jersey (AP) - Federal investigators say a Continental Airlines pilot's failure to follow procedures caused a plane's tail section to strike the runway during a takeoff from Newark Liberty International Airport in 2005.

The report issued Thursday by the National Transportation Safety Board said strong winds also contributed.

Aircraft manufacturer Boeing was cited for failing to provide adequate data accounting for gusty crosswinds during takeoff.

The flight, which was bound for Hong Kong, returned safely to the airport. None of the 214 people on board were injured, but inspectors found substantial damage to a part of the tail section.

A Continental spokesman said the airline used the incident to update its training manuals.
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Old March 3rd, 2008, 07:46 AM   #2409
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Heat on over timing of third runway
Hong Kong Standard
Monday, March 03, 2008

The government has come under fire for dragging its feet on planning for a third runway when the two now in service at the Hong Kong International Airport could reach capacity by 2014 - years before a third runway could be ready.

The criticism came despite an announcement by Financial Secretary John Tsang Chun-wah that the Airport Authority is to start engineering and environmental feasibility studies some time this year.

"We are confident that the capacity of the existing runways can be gradually increased to 68 aircraft movements per hour by 2015," Tsang told lawmakers.

That compares with the 54 movements per hour currently, which is expected to be increased to 58 next year.

Chinese University's aviation policy and research center associate director Law Cheung-kwok said the government could ill-afford to waste any more time contemplating the construction of a third runway.

"It takes about three to four years for a runway's initial planning and design, another four for public consultation, then another four to build it," he said. "It took London's Heathrow 12 years to build a new runway."

"If we adopt a 5 percent annual growth rate for air traffic, the airport will reach capacity as early as 2014, or half the time before we can get ourselves a new runway."

Law noted that the two existing parallel runways at the airport, considered widely separated, are 1,525 meters apart and each is 3,800 meters long.

"The authorities should also consider whether there needs to be a fourth runway in the future," he said.

Airport Authority chairman Victor Fung Kwok-king was earlier quoted as saying the authority's top priority was to increase the capacity of the existing runways rather than build a third.

A spokeswoman from the Airport Authority argued that the two concepts did not contradict one another, reiterating that feasibility studies will be under way within the year.
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Old March 3rd, 2008, 05:47 PM   #2410
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
"It takes about three to four years for a runway's initial planning and design, another four for public consultation, then another four to build it," he said. "It took London's Heathrow 12 years to build a new runway."
...

"The authorities should also consider whether there needs to be a fourth runway in the future," he said.
We only spent 12 years or so to plan, design, consult, build and open the entire airport project and the supporting infrastructures back in the 80s and 90s. It's only a runway now, I am sure we can do it in 2/3 or even half the time if we really push it.

And I wonder where the fourth can go, another east-west oriented runway? Or put it perpendicular to the other three on the west end of the airport island making three and half? At least giving the airport an alternative option when there is strong cross-wind.
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Old March 4th, 2008, 04:22 AM   #2411
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Earlier warning for pilots with new wind-shear alerts
Hong Kong Standard
Tuesday, March 04, 2008

The Hong Kong Observatory and Northwest Airlines yesterday unveiled the first-ever uplink of wind-shear alerts to the aircraft cockpits via a Light Detection and Ranging system - called LIDAR - to improve safety.

LIDAR, which functions only during fine weather conditions and collects wind data at Chek Lap Kok using infrared light lasers, enables pilots to receive automated information on wind shear - a rapid change in wind direction or speed over a very short distance - 40 minutes, or 370 kilometers, before landing.

Each message costs less than HK$1 to transmit. Previously, pilots only received information through verbal communication with the control tower five to 10 minutes before arrival.

"It's good for us to know as far ahead of time as possible [about] the weather so that we can make adjustments," said Steve Smith, chief pilot of Northwest Airlines.

He said when pilots get information on wind shear they can plan whether to delay landing, hold and circle, or use different runways to land.

Northwest meteorology manager Tom Fahey said the threshold for the company is 20 knots of wind shear, one of the conditions pilots consider when landing.

They would rule against landing if it is more than 20 knots.

The observatory's senior scientific officer Sandy Song Man-kuen said wind shear could affect an aircraft's intended path, reduce its lift or bring turbulence.

She said the system, costing HK$18 million and currently semi-operational, has attracted interest from some airlines.

Since the airport at Chek Lap Kok opened in 1998, about one in 500 flights had reported significant wind shear, which can cause major problems for pilots on landing and takeoff.

Meanwhile, the observatory has also provided the local general aviation community with a website as a platform to share pilots' latest reports on weather observations.

Under the scheme, launched this month and joined by the Government Flying Service, Hong Kong Aviation Club, Heliexpress and Heliservices, pilots will report weather information such as visibility, wind speed, cloud base and turbulence after their flights.

"The best advantage is that we can share fast and clear information," GFS quality and safety manager Marcus Chan Shu-kei said.

Kenny Choi Chi-yuen, flying instructor at the Aviation Club, said they would not take off if the cloud base is reported at 600 meters above sea level.

Club president Danny Patterson said pilots previously recorded observations on their own, but now they have a more convenient way of sharing useful information.
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Old March 4th, 2008, 08:04 AM   #2412
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LCQ1: Hygiene conditions of civilian passenger aircraft
Government Press Release
Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Following is a question by the Dr Hon Raymond Ho and a reply by the Secretary for Food and Health, Dr York Chow, in the Legislative Council today (February 20):

Question:

Reports of rats found on civilian passenger aircraft are heard from time to time. In addition to spreading germs and posing hygiene hazards, rats may even bite and damage the electrical wires on the aircraft, jeopardising flight safety. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council whether:

(a) it knows if there were cases of rats found on arriving civilian passenger aircraft in the past five years; if there were such cases, of the number; and

(b) the hygiene conditions of arriving civilian passenger aircraft are subject to regulation under the laws of Hong Kong; if so, of the regulatory measures adopted by the responsible government department(s) to ensure that the hygiene conditions of aircraft are satisfactory, to avoid passengers' health or even flight safety from being affected?

Reply:

Madam President,

Airlines are duty-bound to ensure the hygiene and flight safety of their aircraft, while the Government plays the monitoring role.

(a) Over the past five years, the Department of Health (DH) did not receive any complaint about rats found on aircraft. During the period between July 2006 and December 2007, DH conducted inspections on over 100 arriving planes and no rat was found. According to the records of the Civil Aviation Department (CAD), there has been no cases of rats being spotted nor cases of aviation safety being affected by rats in passenger aircraft arriving in Hong Kong in the past five years.

(b) In Hong Kong, hygiene matters relating to international civilian passenger aircraft are subject to regulation under the Quarantine and Prevention of Disease Ordinance (Cap.141). The Port Health Office (PHO) of the DH is responsible for the enforcement work.

The scope of work involved in safeguarding the hygiene of international civilian passenger aircraft includes monitoring the hygiene condition of water and food supplied to aircraft crew members and passengers, the environmental hygiene of the airport passenger terminal, its surroundings and aircraft, as well as conducting surveillance of disease vectors (such as mosquitoes and rodents) at the airport. PHO staff will conduct inspections at the airport and on aircraft to monitor their hygiene conditions and collect samples from water supply points, air caterers and aircraft for examination. The PHO will initiate investigations and follow-up actions after a complaint about hygiene conditions on aircraft has been received. The PHO will also maintain close cooperation with the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department and the Airport Authority Hong Kong (AA) to monitor the environmental hygiene and disease vectors at the airport. Where necessary, it will give advice to the AA, airlines and other related parties such as restaurants, etc. on the improvement of environmental hygiene.

On flight safety, CAD requires our airlines to maintain the highest safety standard in both their flight and maintenance operations in accordance with the standards and recommended practices of the International Civil Aviation Organisation and the laws of Hong Kong. For example, to uphold aviation safety, CAD requires rigorous inspections of aircraft by the flight and maintenance crews before each flight to ensure the normal operation of all aircraft systems. CAD conducts regular inspections to ensure compliance with the relevant requirements by the airlines.
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Old March 4th, 2008, 09:48 AM   #2413
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Old March 4th, 2008, 03:59 PM   #2414
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You'd think that Hong Kong, despite the disguise of an SAR, is still a Chinese city. But I don't see many Mainland Chinese airlines.

Hmm.. Is the thread starter using this thread as a guise for a Cathay Pacific photo album, and occasionally putting in one or two airlines to make sure this is still a HKIA photo thread?
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Old March 4th, 2008, 05:45 PM   #2415
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddes View Post
You'd think that Hong Kong, despite the disguise of an SAR, is still a Chinese city. But I don't see many Mainland Chinese airlines.

Hmm.. Is the thread starter using this thread as a guise for a Cathay Pacific photo album, and occasionally putting in one or two airlines to make sure this is still a HKIA photo thread?
Not true. China Eastern has a huge presence in Hong Kong. However, Hong Kong is a very international city, so even that huge presence is overwhelmed by the range of international airlines flying here.

In fact, there is quite a huge variety of airlines represented in here. Obviously since Cathay and Dragonair hub here, there'll be plenty of their aircraft.
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Old March 4th, 2008, 05:58 PM   #2416
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricIsHim View Post
We only spent 12 years or so to plan, design, consult, build and open the entire airport project and the supporting infrastructures back in the 80s and 90s. It's only a runway now, I am sure we can do it in 2/3 or even half the time if we really push it.

And I wonder where the fourth can go, another east-west oriented runway? Or put it perpendicular to the other three on the west end of the airport island making three and half? At least giving the airport an alternative option when there is strong cross-wind.
Very dangerous to create a north-south runway. Planes can never land from the south at all with the tall peaks of Lantau and the residentials of Tung Chung in the way.
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Old March 4th, 2008, 11:18 PM   #2417
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I always see plently of mainland carrier aircraft when at HKG. Only narrowbodies though as far as I remember.
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Old March 8th, 2008, 05:57 PM   #2418
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By tamyron from HKADB :









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Old March 12th, 2008, 07:05 AM   #2419
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'Unfair,' says Cebu Pacific of HK airline's flights from Clark airport
12 March 2008
BusinessWorld

Gokongwei-led Cebu Pacific is up in arms over the government's decision to allow a Hong Kong carrier to operate from the Diosdado Macapagal International Airport (DMIA) in Clark, again calling for "reciprocity" with respect to other countries when it comes to an "open skies" policy.

In a statement yesterday, the country's leading domestic carrier questioned the rights given to Hong Kong Express, which started Clark-to- Hong Kong flights last week, noting that the foreign carrier took advantage of Executive Order 500A, which virtually opened Clark to foreign carriers.

There is no such privilege for Filipino carriers in other countries, Cebu Pacific pointed out. "It is unfortunate that a Filipino airline does not have the same privilege a foreign airline enjoys in the Philippines," Cebu Pacific Vice-President for Marketing Candice Iyog said.

"The favor has not been returned. In our case, the foreign governments turned down our application to fly from Clark, making it a nonviable fourth hub for [Cebu Pacific] at this time. We would like to see reciprocity and fairness," Ms. Iyod added.

Cebu Pacific claimed it could surpass its target of seven million domestic and international passengers this year if allowed to fly the Clark-Hong Kong route matching Hong Kong Express' service.

Last June, Cebu Pacific expressed intentions to make the DMIA its fourth hub in the country apart from Manila, Cebu and Davao. But this was derailed when its applications to fly from Clark to Asian destinations Hong Kong, Macau, Bangkok and Taipei were turned down due to lack of entitlements. Only Singapore's aviation body allowed the budget carrier to operate from Clark.

Lucio Tan-led Philippine Airlines (PAL) echoed Cebu Pacific's reservations on the government's open skies policy, saying this will affect PAL once it decides to mount flights from the former American air base.

In a telephone interview, PAL Vice-President for Corporate Communications Rolando G. Estabillo said the current setup grants more rights to foreign carriers than domestic airlines.

"The problem is the lack of reciprocity. We think it would have been better if there is reciprocity for all parties on a bilateral platform. That (unilateral open skies policy) will adversely impact us once we start operating in and out of Clark," Mr. Estabillo told BusinessWorld.

Mr. Estabillo said PAL intends to operate at the DMIA, which is being groomed to be the country's next international gateway as soon as the facilities like a passenger terminal and catering services are developed.

Officials from the Department of Transportation and Communication and from the Civil Aeronautics Board could not be reached for comment.
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Old March 12th, 2008, 07:09 AM   #2420
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AirAsia service to Malaysia set for May takeoff
11 March 2008
South China Morning Post

Budget carrier AirAsia will finally make its debut in Hong Kong on May 15, with a daily service to Kuala Lumpur for as little as HK$99 one-way. The move is expected to boost competition and passenger traffic in the region.

"I believe Hong Kong, if we can get the right slots and times, will be a very big route for us," AirAsia chief executive Tony Fernandes said in Kuala Lumpur.

The daily flight will depart Kuala Lumpur at 7am and arrive in Hong Kong at 11am before turning around about 30 minutes later. The carrier hopes to add evening departures soon to cater to business travellers.

Mr Fernandes said the Hong Kong-Kuala Lumpur route could easily grow to four or five flights a day.

The budget carrier is the largest in Southeast Asia. It uses the Airbus A320, which has 180 seats.

The route is now dominated by Cathay Pacific Airways, with three daily departures, and Malaysia Airlines, which flies twice daily. A Cathay Pacific spokesman said the airline offered promotional fares on various routes to reflect seasonal cycles. The latest promotion, which ended yesterday, carried fares from HK$990 to HK$1,990. "Aviation is already a competitive industry. Our fares are entirely market-driven," the spokesman said.

Halimy Mahmood, Hong Kong area manager for Malaysia Airlines, was not available for comment.

Mr Fernandes said AirAsia had been working on flying to Hong Kong for the past four years, but had only got as close as Macau until now. Relatively higher operating costs in Hong Kong had largely resulted in Macau capturing more of the budget air travel market.

A year ago, the Airport Authority announced it would invest more than HK$1 billion to build a 10-stand satellite concourse targeting small aircraft and carriers with a quick turnaround, like budget airlines. AirAsia's turnaround is usually 25 minutes.

"What we've done in Macau has probably excited Hong Kong airport," Mr Fernandes said. "We've gone from no flights to now 12 flights a day. In four years, we are now the second-largest airline in Macau and we're not far away from Air Macau. So the potential [for] growing business in Hong Kong is very good. There's no reason a Hong Kong destination couldn't have 12, if not more flights a day from AirAsia."

Through Kuala Lumpur, AirAsia was also looking to connect Hong Kong to other destinations like Bangkok, Jakarta, Kota Kinabalu and Penang, he said.

Mirza Mohammad Taiyab, director general of the Malaysia Tourism Promotion Board, said with the new AirAsia route, the number of Hong Kong visitors to Malaysia could rise by more than 30 per cent in the next few years. He wanted to increase the percentage of business travellers to Malaysia from 4.6 per cent of total arrivals in 2006 to 10 per cent in five years' time.
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