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Old November 21st, 2010, 08:12 PM   #3521
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 04:51 AM   #3522
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Additional air service
22 November 2010
The Cairns Post

TRAVEL from the Far North to Hong Kong will reach an important milestone today as Cairnsairport welcomes passengers on the first of the new daily Cathay Pacific service.

Hong Kong is an important aviation hub in Asia, linking Cairns to China the UK and Europe.

Until today, only six flights a week were offered on the route.

The extra service will make another 26,000 seats available on flights to and from Hong Kong each year.
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 04:47 PM   #3523
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Aviation Passenger Fuel Surcharges adjusted
Friday, November 19, 2010
Government Press Release

The Civil Aviation Department (CAD) today (November 19) gave approval for passenger fuel surcharges levied by three airlines to be increased for the period December 1 to 31, 2010.

The new maximum levels of fuel surcharges will be $120 for short-haul flights and $566 for long-haul flights, which represent an increase of 11% and 9% from the current maximum levels for short and long haul flights respectively. The applicable surcharge levels are based on the ticket issue date. (These airlines and their newly approved fuel surcharge levels are listed in the Annex.)

Passenger fuel surcharges seek to allow airlines to partially recover the increase in operational costs due to fluctuations in aviation fuel prices. As the aeronautical authority in Hong Kong, the CAD considers and approves fuel surcharge applications from the airlines in accordance with bilateral Air Services Agreements.

Passenger fuel surcharges are reviewed regularly by the CAD. The last review was done at the end of October when the maximum surcharge levels approved by the CAD were $108 for short-haul flights and $521 for long-haul flights.

Annex : http://gia.info.gov.hk/general/20101...0091_71850.pdf
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 10:48 PM   #3524
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http://www.news.gov.hk/en/categories...2_191933.shtml

HK to mark aviation centenary
November 22, 2010

A series of events will be organised throughout next year to celebrate the 100th anniversary of aviation development in Hong Kong.

Director-General of Civil Aviation Norman Lo announced at a press conference today that events will include a photo exhibition, Asian Aerospace 2011, an aircraft pull, a charity gala dinner, career talks and visits, an aviation knowledge contest, 4D movie shows, a birdman flying competition and a carnival day. Various commemorative items, such as special stamps and philatelic souvenirs will also be issued.

"Through these programmes, we aim to celebrate the centenary of the first powered flight in Hong Kong and promote Hong Kong as an international and regional aviation centre," said Mr Lo. "We also [aim] to raise funds for charity and promote aviation knowledge among young people."

More than 40 organisations will take part.

Aviation activities in Hong Kong began with balloon flights in the 19th Century. In 1911 an aviation pioneer from Belgium, Charles Van den Born, arrived in Hong Kong with three Henry Farman biplanes. He flew from the beach in Sha Tin on March 18, 1911, marking Hong Kong's first powered flight.
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Old November 24th, 2010, 09:55 AM   #3525
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HONG KONG'S RIGHT UP THERE
19 November 2010
Waikato Times

Jet-lagged Paul Rush uncovers the world's top airport stopover for crumpled, muscle-aching long-distance travellers.

* Hong Kong International Airport has rated first or second in the world airport awards over the past decade in the annual Skytrax surveys of five million travellers.

* Being on a direct flight route from New Zealand and Australia to Europe, Hong Kong is the perfect stopover for breaking the tedium of a long flight and for shopping in the city's 20 modern shopping malls.

* For regular Cathay Pacific flyers there is the opportunity to join the prestigious Marco Polo Club and enjoy the soothing comforts of their very extensive lounge where boarding calls are made for each outbound flight.

* WEBSITES: Cathay Pacific Airwayswww.cathaypacific.com; Marriott Sky City Hotel www.marriott.com.hotels; Plaza Network Travellers Lounges www.plaza-network.com; SkyTracks Airport Surveys www.airlinequality.com

I 'm touching down in Hong Kong after an 11-hour flight from Milan, craving a little comfort and ease before the homeward leg to Auckland.

In my slightly jet-lagged state I hold on to one positive thought. I'm transiting at a five-star airport - one of only three in the world. The annual Skytrax passenger survey results indicate that people needing superlative stopover amenities will find them here.

Hong Kong's Chep Lak Kok airport on Lantau Island has taken off as one of the marvels of the modern aviation age, handling 40 million passengers each year. Changi Airport won the top accolades for 2010 but Hong Kong remains in the top three for user- friendly passenger processing, speed and efficiency and having great facilities and transport links.

I'm with a group of travellers who have decided that our 12-hour stopover warrants taking day-rooms in the SkyCity Marriott Hotel at Hong Kong Airport. The hotel is beautifully sited on the shores of the South China Sea but, after taking a glimpse of the sweeping views, my thoughts focus on having a good three-hour sleep.

Then I plan to swim in the hotel Health Club pool, have a light lunch and a relaxing massage to soothe away the effects of the long air miles. I don't want to experience a thumb-pressing, elbow-leaning massage where pain is the whole point. I just want a gentle rub down to ease the tension.

At the hotel's Quan Spa I choose the traditional aroma fusion deep-tissue massage with essential oils. The therapist gets to work with a will and explains that the treatment works by adjusting the flow of qi, balancing the body's healing energy. Whatever it is doing, it feels exceptionally good to me.

The pressure effects are deep and penetrating and my stiff neck and tiredness are soothed away by the healing hands. The insomnia, which a glass of red wine and two movies failed to cure on the inbound flight, doesn't seem such a problem now. I'm left with a slight feeling of jet lag from travelling east over multiple time zones, so it's a good result.

With some eight hours in Hong Kong remaining it's logical to use the hotel's free shuttle to the MTR subway and take the 28-minute ride into the city to see the sights.

I join a city tour that takes in The Peak with its stunning 360-degree view across Hong Kong Island, Victoria Harbour and Kowloon. The city skyline is truly remarkable with its futuristic architecture, soaring glass towers and tall apartment blocks that rise like fortress ramparts above the harbour.

This skyline is arguably the most spectacular in the world, a kind of oriental Manhattan Island on steroids. It's an architectural statement of audacious verticality that boggles the mind and excites the senses.

Returning to street level I experience the frenetic activity of the dense population, the noisy traffic and atmospheric alleyways with their aromatic food stalls. I visit the Man Mo Temple in Hollywood Rd, where people shuffle their way reverentially into the inner sanctum over well-worn, ash- covered floors. I slowly absorb the ambience of the temple, the huddled press of worshippers, smoking incense coils, scattered burnt-out joss sticks and the enveloping wrap of humid air.

There are other guided tours to Disneyland, Ocean Park Aquarium, the Heritage Museum, Madame Tussauds and the Botanical Gardens. The must-do Star Ferry ride between Kowloon and Hong Kong Island gives an insight into the city's heart and soul, its seething humanity and transport efficiency.

I spend time in the Tsim Sha Tsui district of Kowloon. It's a pleasant way to fill in an hour or so, wandering up Nathan Rd and slipping into narrow side streets to catch the local colour, where the air is redolent with the aromas of traditional Chinese cooking and fresh baking. Vendors' stalls are stacked to a precarious height with tropical fruits, assorted vegetables, unusual fish and unidentifiable meats.

The frenetic pace of selling activity is maddening and entertaining at the same time. Hustlers soliciting for tailors and touts selling Rolex watches and designer bags, will welcome you as new friends in the fascinating, odoriferous alleyways. It's all about dollars and scents. If retailing ever becomes an Olympic sport, the back- street traders of Kowloon will surely be world-beaters.

For travellers who don't wish to go into the city there are shopping and sightseeing options closer to hand. Terminal 2 has a full range of family entertainment facilities including a 4D Cinema, games complex, food outlets and an Expo Centre with trade exhibits. The Sky Plaza Shopping Centre within this terminal has a homely environment and a wide selection of goods.

A cable-car runs from the airport area over the sea to the base of Lantau Island's Po Lin Buddha, the largest seated bronze Buddha in Asia. There you can enjoy a cafe snack and visit the large monastery.

When the time arrives to check in for my flight to Auckland, I begin to appreciate why Hong Kong Airport carries a five-star rating. There are plenty of staff manning the customs desks, so I pass through with a minimum of fuss and ride the efficient travelators to the departure gate. The terminal building is pleasant to walk through and being spacious, light and airy, doesn't feel crowded.

The main terminal has a number of comfort and pampering facilities offering everything from business centres and all-day buffet to beauty treatments and spa therapy. The Plaza lounges are open to all airport users, regardless of airline or class of travel, at a reasonable cost. The Plaza Premium lounge is in the Arrivals Hall and the travellers lounges are adjacent to Departure Gates 1 and 35.

There are also coin-operated massage chairs throughout the terminal where you can sit and watch plasma TV. Family-friendly facilities include children's play areas, nursery rooms, a games area and mini-theatres.

I feel rested and ready for my flight home. This experience has taught me that long stopovers at an airport are quite manageable and can work well with a little planning.

Hong Kong will become an increasingly important hub for journeys to Europe, Asia and the Middle East. It's reassuring to know there are ways to grab a few hours' relaxation in the comfort zone.

* Paul Rush travelled to Hong Kong courtesy of Cathay Pacific Airways and the Marriott Skycity Hotel.
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Old November 24th, 2010, 02:58 PM   #3526
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Source : http://www.fotop.net/god20

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Old November 25th, 2010, 04:57 PM   #3527
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LCQ16: Noise nuisance caused by helicopter rescue service
Wednesday, November 24, 2010
Government Press Release

Following is a question by the Hon Leung Kwok-hung and a written reply by the Secretary for Food and Health, Dr York Chow, in the Legislative Council today (November 24):

Question:

I have received complaints from some Eastern District residents that the residents in the district suffer from noise nuisance because the helicopter rescue service is mainly carried out at Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital (PYNEH). They have pointed out that helipads are at present provided at PYNEH and Tuen Mun Hospital (TMH) for emergency casualty evacuation. According to the view of the Government Flying Service (GFS), landing at TMH is restricted due to safety considerations, hence under normal circumstances, emergency patients and casualties are mainly transferred to PYNEH which provides 24-hour emergency services; yet, the noise generated by such rescue helicopters is not subject to regulation, and while the residents understand the importance of rescue operations and have no intention of raising objection, they hope that the authorities will help them solve the noise problem. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) of the number of landings made by rescue helicopters at various public hospitals in the past five years;

(b) apart from the measures mentioned by GFS and the Civil Aviation Department to members of the Eastern District Council on March 18 this year, what other specific measures the authorities have to mitigate the aforesaid noise problem in Eastern District, and whether they will allocate additional resources to assist residents in installing noise mitigation facilities; and whether they know if the Hospital Authority (HA) will divert such service to other hospitals in the long run; and

(c) given that there are over 20 days in a year on which helicopter operations at PYNEH are precluded by adverse weather conditions, making it impossible to carry out emergency casualty evacuation within the shortest possible time, whether it knows if HA will consider constructing additional helipads at suitable public hospitals throughout Hong Kong; if HA will, when the helipads will be constructed; if not, of the reasons for that?

Reply:

President,

Among all public hospitals under the Hospital Authority (HA), the Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital (PYNEH) and Tuen Mun Hospital (TMH) are provided with helipad facilities. The Government Flying Service (GFS) will adopt various means to transfer casualties to hospitals according to their medical conditions. Under the Emergency Casualty Evacuation and Rescue Service Arrangement drawn up by GFS and HA, "Type A+" casualties (i.e. patients with life-threatening conditions) will be transferred to hospital by helicopter to ensure that they could be sent to the Accident and Emergency Department for treatment as soon as possible. "Type A" casualties (i.e. patients with emergency medical conditions other than life-threatening conditions) and "Type B" casualties (patients with lesser emergency) will be first conveyed to GFS's Wan Chai heliport, or depending on weather conditions, to its Headquarters at the Hong Kong International Airport, before being transferred by ambulance to a hospital nearby for treatment.

(a) The number of landings made by rescue helicopters at the two public hospitals with helipad in the past five years is set out in Annex.

(b) and (c) To reduce the noise impact caused by helicopter landing at hospital to residents in the vicinity, GFS, having consulted the Civil Aviation Department (CAD), has adopted flight paths away from residential areas as far as possible, and taken noise mitigation measures including the use of low noise helicopters as well as slowing down the rotor speed of helicopters to reduce the noise level during the transfer of casualties at helipad.

In providing a helipad, apart from compliance of design standards and safety requirements, the safety of the flight paths would also need to be taken into consideration. At present, since there are many high-rise buildings in the vicinity of most public hospitals with Accident and Emergency Departments, suitable and safe flight paths for helicopters may not be available. In addition, the existing hospital blocks have not been designed to cater for the landing by helicopters. Therefore the structure of the buildings is not capable of supporting the load of a helicopter and a helipad. There exist difficulties in providing a helipad on the roofs of these existing hospital blocks. Also, landing of helicopters may cause vibration to the hospital blocks and affect the medical equipment in the building.

In planning for new acute hospital, we will consider providing helipad facilities at the hospital depending on the need and circumstances. The provision of helipad facilities needs to be technically feasible and meets the relevant safety standards and statutory requirements. For instance, we may need to conduct environmental study or Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) in accordance with the EIA Ordinance, in order to minimise the environmental impact of the facilities to nearby residential dwellings. HA will maintain communication with the relevant departments, including GFS and CAD, in considering the provision of helipad facilities.

Annex : http://gia.info.gov.hk/general/20101...0200_72010.pdf
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Old November 26th, 2010, 04:54 AM   #3528
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HKIA Stages Annual Crash Exercise
Involving Aircraft and Ground Vehicle on the Runway

Press Release



HONG KONG, 19 November 2010 – This year’s annual crash exercise was successfully staged at Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) today. For the first time, the exercise simulated a crash incident involving an aircraft and a ground vehicle on the runway. More than 1,000 participants representing over 20 organisations fully tested their ability to manage a coordinated response to a large-scale emergency situation.

Codenamed Crash Exercise 2010, the exercise began at 0500hrs when an arriving A320 aircraft ran into an incursion vehicle on the South Runway during landing. Simulated surviving passengers and crew members evacuated the plane immediately, as the Fire Services Department’s Airport Fire Contingent activated the crash alarm to put the rescue plan in motion. The first rescue personnel arrived at the scene within two minutes. Dragonair was the participating airline for this year’s exercise.

The Airport Emergency Centre was activated immediately to facilitate close communication, effective coordination and swift responses among all concerned parties. A total of 36 simulated “fatalities” and 88 “injuries” were reported in the exercise. The “injured” were sent to six hospitals. Forty-one “uninjured” passengers were escorted to the Passenger Reception Centre in the restricted area of Terminal 1 for police debriefing, immigration and customs clearances before heading to the Family Reception Centre for reunification with their relatives.

After completing the rescue phase, Airport Authority Hong Kong (AA) and other major parties involved in the contingency operation - including the Civil Aviation Department, Hong Kong Police, Fire Services Department and Dragonair - jointly held a simulated media conference. About 30 university journalism students from the Hong Kong Baptist University, the Chinese University of Hong Kong and Hong Kong Shue Yan University acted as journalists reporting on the accident.

C K Ng, Deputy Director, Airport Operations of Airport Authority Hong Kong, said, “The annual exercise provides an excellent opportunity for the airport community to test its operational and management capability for large-scale contingencies in a stressful, real-time environment. The experience we have gained today will help refine our procedures and enhance coordination among members of the airport community – allowing us to respond to emergency situations more efficiently and effectively.”

HKIA conducts around 40 drills and exercises every year, including the annual exercise required by aerodrome licensing procedures as part of AA’s commitment to providing safe and secure services and facilities for passengers.

Participating Organisations

Government Departments

Auxiliary Medical Service
Civil Aid Service
Civil Aviation Department
Customs & Excise Department
Fire Services Department
Home Affairs Department
Hong Kong Police Force
Hospital Authority
Immigration Department
Information Services Department
Port Health Office / Department of Health

Hospitals

Kwong Wah Hospital
Prince of Wales Hospital
Princess Margaret Hospital
Queen Elizabeth Hospital
Tuen Mun Hospital
Yan Chai Hospital

Business Partners

Airport Chaplaincy Service
Aviation Security Company Ltd.
Dragonair
Hong Kong Airport Services Ltd.
Raffles Medical Group
Regal Airport Hotel

Other Organisations

Hong Kong Red Cross
Hong Kong St. John Ambulance
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Old November 26th, 2010, 10:08 AM   #3529
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http://www.metrohk.com.hk/index.php?...tail&id=149075 (in chinese)

The World Air Stewardess Association, established in 2010, has just ranked Hong Kong International Airport as the best airport in the world. Beijing International Airport ranked second, & Singapore Changi Airpprt ranked third.

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Old November 27th, 2010, 07:24 AM   #3530
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Speech by CE at HAECO 60th Anniversary Celebration Ceremony
Wednesday, November 17, 2010
Government Press Release


The Chief Executive, Mr Donald Tsang, attended the 60th Anniversary Celebration Ceremony of Hong Kong Aircraft Engineering Company Limited (HAECO) at Hong Kong International Airport this morning (November 17). Picture shows Mr Tsang delivering his speech.


Mr Tsang unveiled a commemorative plague with other officiating guests.


Following is the speech by the Chief Executive, Mr Donald Tsang, at the 60th Anniversary Celebration Ceremony of Hong Kong Aircraft Engineering Company Limited (HAECO) today (November 17):

Mr [Chris] Pratt, Mr [Augustus] Tang, Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen,

I am indeed very delighted to join you to celebrate the 60th Anniversary of the Hong Kong Aircraft Engineering Company Limited, better known in Hong Kong as HAECO.

First, a heartfelt "thank you" to everyone at HAECO for your hard work, dedication and professionalism over the years.

Through your efforts Hong Kong has an excellent track record in aviation safety. This is an important part of our status and reputation as a regional and international aviation centre.

Speaking as a reluctant frequent flier, I certainly appreciate the extra peace of mind that your expertise helps to provide.

Today, HAECO is among the world's top five maintenance, repair and overhaul companies. It provides top quality services to over 80 airlines around the world. HAECO also employs some 5,000 people in Hong Kong alone and has recruited some 600 additional staff this year.

In a nutshell, HAECO is a true Hong Kong success story.

In the spirit of local success stories, HAECO has also spread its wings through joint ventures in Mainland China. It has formed partnerships with leading aviation companies such as Rolls Royce, Boeing and General Electric.

Since relocating to Chek Lap Kok in 1998, the company has expanded quickly. Hanger 2 was commissioned in 2006 and Hanger 3 began operation last year.

This was a timely response to new developments in aviation as well as the industry’s rebound from the global financial crisis.

Passenger traffic at Hong Kong International Airport hit a record high of 42.4 million during the first ten months of this year. That represents year-on-year growth of 11 per cent. During the same period, air cargo traffic reached 3.4 million tonnes – a more than 27 per cent increase year-on-year.

Hong Kong is also more inter-connected. New flights to Milan, Moscow and Hongqiao of Shanghai were launched this year.

Just last month, a new service to Tokyo's Haneda airport began operating. I enjoyed the convenience of this service last week when I attended the APEC Summit in Japan.

These flights have further strengthened our aviation network to include some 155 international destinations, including some 40 Mainland cities.

Ladies and gentlemen, as we celebrate 60 years of HAECO's success, let us also cast an eye toward Hong Kong's aviation future.

Among the new projects is a permanent SkyPier which opened in January this year. A new cargo terminal project, led by the private sector, is expected to be completed in early 2013. We also expect work on the midfield expansion project to begin in the second half of next year.

We will seek views from stakeholders and the public on the proposals for a third runway. This consultation period is expected to begin in the first half of next year after the Hong Kong International Airport Master Plan 2030 Study is completed.

Ladies and gentlemen, Hong Kong has counted on HAECO's support and services over the past six decades to become a global aviation hub.

Please join me in congratulating HAECO on its 60th Anniversary and wishing the company every success in achieving new heights in many decades to come.

Thank you.
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Old November 28th, 2010, 07:41 AM   #3531
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By bae146 from HKADB :







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Old November 29th, 2010, 01:57 PM   #3532
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Strong Traffic Rebound Underpins Airport Authority’s
Robust Interim Results

Press Release

(HONG KONG, 29 November 2010) – Airport Authority Hong Kong (AA) today announced the unaudited interim financial results for the six months ended 30 September 2010. Revenue and profit attributable to equity shareholder increased 19% and 50% respectively over the same period in the previous year, to HK$5,142 million and HK$1,961 million.

All three categories of air traffic showed strong growth as the industry continued to recover from the impact of the global financial crisis. In the first half of fiscal 2010/2011, Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) received 26 million passengers, handled 2.1 million tonnes of cargo and processed 154,834 aircraft movements, representing a year-on-year growth of about 13%, 27% and 12%, respectively.

The robust growth in passenger traffic and improving economy also brought about an impressive increase in revenue from retail operations, which made a significant contribution to the AA’s interim profit growth.

Stanley Hui Hon-chung, Chief Executive Officer of the Airport Authority, is delighted to see that business has bounced back and air traffic has returned to pre-crisis levels. He said, “The pace and force of the recovery in air traffic demand in the first half of this fiscal year was better than expected. Air cargo, which suffered the most during the economic downturn, did particularly well in the period under review, boosted by robust export and transshipment. The outstanding 50% bottom-line increase was mainly the result of strong performance in both air traffic volumes and retail operations, accounting for a revenue growth of 19% and 25% respectively.”

Mr Hui added, “With signs of sustained economic growth, we are on track for new records in passenger and cargo volume as well as aircraft movements, although the rate of growth in the coming months may slow down against a higher base for comparison.”

To cope with robust market demand, airlines are not only reinstating the capacities suspended during the global downturn, but have also been adding new ones. In the six-month period ended 30 September, five airlines joined HKIA or resumed their services, adding about 32 flights per week. A total of 12 destinations were also resumed or launched in the same period.

Cross-boundary traffic at HKIA also recorded substantial increases alongside air traffic growth. Number of cross-boundary sea-to-air-/air-to-sea passengers at SkyPier surged 35.8% from a year ago to 1.2 million between April and September this year. A single-day record of 11,406 passengers at SkyPier was achieved on 1-October National Day.

Passenger number for cross-boundary coaches and limousines registered a year-on-year increase of 33% to about 854,000 during the period.

Ten new licensees that provide cross-boundary coach and limousine service have joined the airport since July this year. New services to Huanggang and Shenzhen Bay Port have also been introduced. Operators at HKIA now run about 460 daily scheduled coach trips between HKIA and 115 destinations in Guangdong, Guangxi and Fujian provinces.

Meanwhile, the airport is working on the detailed design of the initial phase of its mid-term capacity enhancement project – the midfield expansion programme – which is important to support the gradual increase in handling capacity of the existing two runways to 68 flights per hour by 2015. The midfield development will ensure that the airport has adequate parking stands and passenger concourse facilities to accommodate the estimated increase in demand to about 70 million passengers and six million tonnes of cargo per annum by 2020.

As an international and regional aviation centre and the preferred gateway to the Mainland, HKIA is renowned for its operational efficiency, service excellence and extensive international air services network in both passenger and cargo services. The relentless efforts of HKIA in providing passengers and other airport users alike with a delightful airport experience was recognised by several organisations in the past few months. These include the award by Airports Council International of the world's best airport among facilities serving over 40 million passengers annually, and the most efficient Asia-Pacific airport award by Air Transport Research Society for the fourth consecutive year.

Last month, the airport won the Best Airport title for the eighth year at the TTG Travel Awards 2010. It was also voted as the Best Airport in China by leading travel publication Business Traveller China earlier this month.

William Lo, Executive Director, Finance, Airport Authority, said, “While we saw a very robust rebound in air traffic in the first six months, we remain cautious about the stability of the financial markets and the pace of recovery in major economies. The Airport Authority is maintaining very healthy financial strength, largely a result of remarkable business growth and effective management of its financial resources. We will continue to operate HKIA based on prudent commercial principles."

http://www.hongkongairport.com/eng/m...s/pr_1014.html
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Old November 29th, 2010, 06:59 PM   #3533
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Old November 29th, 2010, 07:07 PM   #3534
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Old November 29th, 2010, 07:36 PM   #3535
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Old December 1st, 2010, 04:27 AM   #3536
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US security plans threaten HK air cargo hub
Security plans threaten HK role as air cargo hub

1 December 2010
South China Morning Post

Hong Kong's status as one of the world's top air cargo centres is under threat from tougher security rules proposed in the United States.

They would require cargo manifests to be submitted 24 hours before flight departure, shippers warned yesterday.

Airlines already have to submit cargo manifests to American authorities before long-haul flights arrive in the US. But the US Customs and Border Protection and Transportation Security Administration are working on plans for the manifests to be sent before aircraft take off.

Outlining the move in mid-November, John Pistole, security administration chief, told a US Senate committee hearing: "With our colleagues at CBP, we are working collaboratively with industry and our international partners to expedite the receipt of cargo manifests for international flights to the United States prior to departure in order to more effectively identify and pre-screen items based on risk and current intelligence."

But Sunny Ho Lap-kee, executive director of the Hong Kong Shippers' Council, said Hong Kong would face severe repercussions if the manifests were required to be filed 24 hours before take-off.

He said the move "will erode all the advantages" Hong Kong has as an efficient air cargo hub.

Ho pointed out that Hong Kong Air Cargo Terminals and Asia Airfreight Terminal can accept cargo up to four hours before flight departure, although he said this can be cut to two hours. But this competitive advantage would be lost if the 24-hour rule, which would be similar to the controls on sea freight, was introduced on air freight.

By comparison, air freight from mainland airports such as Shenzhen, Shanghai and Guangzhou was already subject to a 24-hour wait before departure because of screening and customs procedures, Ho said.

Paul Tsui, chairman of the Hong Kong Association of Freight Forwarding and Logistics, said: "I wouldn't think 24 hours is going to be implemented. There are a lot of objections from different stakeholders."

He thought US regulators would shy away from introducing such tough measures because of the disruption and increased shipping costs it would cause to the supply chain.

But Tsui said Hong Kong's air cargo industry was already facing challenges because of the need to screen 100 per cent of cargo on passenger flights to the US.

He said similar measures would be implemented on flights to Canada from March and expected the European Union to follow with a similar requirement.

He added that US regulators last week launched a discussion paper to pre-screen all cargo carried on freighter aircraft with a requirement to X-ray 50 per cent of cargo in the first year of implementation and 100 per cent in the second year.

This would create major challenges for air cargo operators and freight forwarders at a time when cargo volumes through Hong Kong were surging.

Tsui said Hong Kong was on course to handle a record 4 million tonnes of air freight this year, making it the world's biggest air cargo centre for the first time, sending the Federal Express cargo hub in Memphis in the United States into second place. This would be equivalent to a 19.5 per cent year-on-year rise, while overall cargo volumes were likely to climb by 7-8 per cent per year over the next two or three years, Tsui said.

Tsui said a large proportion of air freight handled at Hong Kong airport was transhipment cargo from the mainland or Taiwan making it difficult for a logistics company to validate the identity of the shipper.

He added that 70 per cent of freight forwarders were small and medium-sized enterprises who lacked the financial resources to invest in screening machines, which cost about HK$600,000 each.

As a result, Tsui said the association was talking to the Airport Authority, Civil Aviation Department and Transport and Housing Bureau about developing a freight station. This would also mean each individual shipment being scanned before being consolidated into larger consignments.

Another proposal would be to allow freight forwarders with the resources to scan shipments at their own facilities rather than face the cost and transport burden of using those at air freight terminal operators.

Tsui said the association would complete a consultation paper this month, which would be submitted to the Civil Aviation Department and associated bodies. "I believe the new [screening] programme will be launched by 2011 and will better accommodate the international security requirements based on the scenario of Hong Kong."
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Old December 2nd, 2010, 05:36 PM   #3537
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Old December 4th, 2010, 08:24 PM   #3538
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http://www.hactl.com/en/mediactr/press20101203.htm

Hactl announces November record tonnage throughput

(3 December 2010, Hong Kong Hong Kong Air Cargo Terminals Limited (Hactl) today released its tonnage throughput for November 2010. A total of 254,552 tonnes were handled in the month, representing a year-on-year growth of 5.6%. Cumulative tonnage for the first 11 months of the year hits a new height of 2,649,611 tonnes, up 26.7% year-on-year and surpassed the pre-crisis annual record high of 2,632,300 tonnes achieved in 2007. It is by far a new handling record for Hactl.

Export volume for November was 146,312 tonnes, up 4.5% year-on-year. Total export volume from January to November was 1,456,324 tonnes, representing a year-on-year growth of 31.6%.

Import volume for November was 59,531 tonnes, down 1.7% against November last year. Aggregate import volume for the first 11 months of 2010 was 677,212 tonnes, representing a year-on-year growth of 21.1%.

The transshipment volume was 48,709 tonnes in November, indicating a year-on-year growth of 19.9%. Cumulative transshipment tonnage for the first 11 months was 516,075 tonnes, up 21.3% against the same period last year.

Ms Lilian Chan, General Manager, Marketing and Customer Service said, “Hactl would not have achieved this amazing new record without the dedication and contribution from our staff in the past months of surging airfreight demand. We are also grateful to our valued customers and business partners who consistently provide their great support to our development.”

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Old December 9th, 2010, 07:26 PM   #3539
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http://airlineroute.net/2010/12/09/om-s11/#more-27789

MIAT Mongolian Airlines is planning charter service to Hong Kong in July and August 2011.


Ulaan Baatar – Hong Kong Charter service operating from 03JUL11 to 28AUG11
OM2209 ULN0650 – 1115HKG 738 47
OM2210 HKG1215 – 1640ULN 738 47

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Old December 13th, 2010, 08:10 PM   #3540
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