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Old June 3rd, 2011, 12:43 PM   #3821
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《香港國際機場2030規劃大綱》


Hong Kong International Airport Master Plan 2030
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Old June 3rd, 2011, 03:24 PM   #3822
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http://asia.businesstraveller.com/as...-kong-seoul-ro

Korean Air to deploy A380 on Hong Kong-Seoul route from June 18

Korean Air will deploy the superjumbo Airbus A380 between Hong Kong and Seoul from June 18 onwards.

Initially the aircraft will be used six times a week on one of the three daily return flights between Hong Kong and Seoul. From July 1 onwards, two daily flights will be served by an A380.

Flight KE608 will fly from Hong Kong to Incheon six days a week, excluding Tuesday. The flight departs Hong Kong at 0050 and arrives in Seoul at 0520. KE607 will also operate six days a week, excluding Monday. It departs Seoul at 2000 and arrives Hong Kong at 2230. These two flights will operate daily from July 4.

From July 1, flights KE604 and KE603 will be served by the A380 on a daily basis, meaning the superjumbo will feature on two of the three flights per day on this route. Flight KE604 departs Hong Kong at 1225, arriving in Seoul at 1700, and flight KE603 departs Seoul at 0830, arriving Hong Kong at 1055.

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Old June 3rd, 2011, 06:50 PM   #3823
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That there's an updated Airport 2030 masterplan (3rd runway layout) I can agree with!*

*Still needs a rail link of extending West Rail across the water (there's a planned road link) to the Cross-boundary/Airport and on to Tung Chung.

Oh and has anyone noticed the "didn't make it" 3rd runway plans ("Runway Capacity" @ 5:34 ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipM2zBo8_zI#at=335)... Option A to Option S.

Option J: 3rd runway on south Lantau @ just off Lo Kei Wan! http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...77162&t=h&z=14

Option M: 3rd runway north of Tai O!! http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...77162&t=h&z=14

What the hell were they thinking? I can sort of imagine airplanes travelling on a narrow jetway to make it from Chep Lap Kok to near Tai O... but south Lantau? WTF?
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Old June 3rd, 2011, 07:52 PM   #3824
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It sounds like the main limiting factor at the Hong Kong Airport is the number of runways, not the parking and terminal slots. Therefore I don't see why need advocate reclaiming a huge area of land for basically a duplicate of the current terminal, all for just one runway. Could be safety, that having a third way that close to an existing one is not safe? I'm sure the ATC could stagger flights so they don't get too close to each other. Reclaiming that much extra land and building huge additional terminals would be so much more than expensive than reclaiming just enough land for a third runway.
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Old June 3rd, 2011, 08:10 PM   #3825
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geography View Post
It sounds like the main limiting factor at the Hong Kong Airport is the number of runways, not the parking and terminal slots. Therefore I don't see why need advocate reclaiming a huge area of land for basically a duplicate of the current terminal, all for just one runway. Could be safety, that having a third way that close to an existing one is not safe? I'm sure the ATC could stagger flights so they don't get too close to each other. Reclaiming that much extra land and building huge additional terminals would be so much more than expensive than reclaiming just enough land for a third runway.
If you actually go through the videos (or the PDF masterplan), it appears the existing contaminated mud-beds are the most expensive to reclaim (using under-sea concrete mixing). It is also these areas that take the load bearing structures such as the actual runway and the passenger concourse.

They already haven't reclaimed what they were planning on the 2025 masterplan (there's a bay area to the south-west of the new runway). Second is the fact the "old" X-shaped passenger concourse will now be freighter aprons and where the new "dual-Y" passenger concourse sits was roughly where the proposed freighter aprons were meant to be. I guess they swapped it around as it made more sense once they've reconfigured (the currently very useless and bad to use) Terminal 2...
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Old June 5th, 2011, 04:52 PM   #3826
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The best airport in the world and this airport deserved it...
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Old June 19th, 2011, 10:54 PM   #3827
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Old June 27th, 2011, 06:04 PM   #3828
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By clwong from HKADB :



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Old June 27th, 2011, 07:24 PM   #3829
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Isnt' HKG a rather expensive for flight testing only??
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Old June 27th, 2011, 09:15 PM   #3830
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricIsHim View Post
Isnt' HKG a rather expensive for flight testing only??
Not if you're route proving, then you'll need to fly to actual airports the said aircraft would likely fly to... Boeing even sent their B777-200LR back in the day some ~21,000km going from HKG to LHR _the long way round_, passing Taiwan, Japan, the Pacific, over North America, across the Atlantic then finally(!!) to London:

http://atwonline.com/aircraftengines...ay-around-0309
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Old June 28th, 2011, 11:44 AM   #3831
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Cathay chief rules out role for airport rivals
23 June 2011
The Standard

Greater cooperation with airports in the mainland and Macau will not end Hong Kong's air traffic congestion woes, Cathay Pacific chief executive John Slosar says.

His comments come three weeks after the Airport Authority proposed a third runway at Hong Kong International Airport that would accommodate an additional 102 flights per hour.

However, opponents have criticized the plan as being too costly and damaging to the environment and local marine life.

The same opponents also suggest that extra traffic be rerouted to surrounding airports in order to ease pressure.

A three-month consultation launched by the authority on June 3 will examine the merits of either building a new runway or simply expanding the existing two. However, Slosar said the cooperation line of thinking has been used in other countries _ but to little effect, because one airport inevitably gets more traffic.

At a fashion show yesterday to unveil Cathay's new staff uniforms, Slosar said: ``People always say that two airports in the same area will support each other, but it doesn't work.

``People just don't like moving between airports.''

As an example, he cited Heathrow and Gatwick in London, where the idea failed.

While Heathrow handled over 66 million passengers in 2009, Gatwick had just about half.

``Hong Kong needs to take responsibility for its own development,'' he added.

Earlier this month, Cathay announced its ``full and unequivocal backing'' of a third runway, stating it is the only ``effective way to address the airport's capacity constraints and ensure long-term competitiveness.''

The airline's new line of uniforms will roll out on July 8.

Renowned local designer Eddie Lau Pui-kei said he came out of retirement especially to design the new uniforms as a favor to the company _ which he sees as a ``good friend.''

The new line features sleek fitted burgundy and champagne jackets atop Cathay's signature long skirts for female employees.

For men, a revamped double- striped tie along with olive vests and jackets will be paired with black trousers.
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Old June 29th, 2011, 06:12 PM   #3832
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Airport Authority Sets New Profit Record of HK$4 Billion for
Financial Year 2010/2011

Press Release

HONG KONG, 29 June 2011 – The Airport Authority Hong Kong (AAHK) announced that Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) set new financial and operational records in the financial year ended 31 March 2011, including a profit attributable to the equity shareholder of HK$4,035 million for fiscal 2010/2011, an increase of 41.9% from a year earlier.

Revenue rose 17.4% to HK$10,583 million while return on equity increased to 11.1% from the 7.8% recorded in fiscal 2009/2010. AAHK declared a final dividend of HK$3,100 million to the Hong Kong SAR Government. With the latest dividend, AAHK will have paid the government a total of HK$22.1 billion in terms of dividends and return of capital since fiscal 2003/2004.

On the operational front, passenger flow, cargo volume and flight movements all surged to new heights over the past year, reaching 51.5 million passenger trips, 4.2 million tonnes and 316,000 movements, representing strong year-on-year growth of 9.7%, 16.5% and 12.9%, respectively.

AAHK Chief Executive Officer Stanley Hui Hon-chung said, “We achieved remarkable results in fiscal 2010/2011 and set records for all performance indicators. This was largely buoyed by sustained economic growth in the Mainland and Hong Kong, a rebound in global trade and increased demand for aviation services. The surge in profit was mainly a result of record revenue, effective cost management and productivity gains.

“In view of the sustained economic expansion of the Mainland and global economies, we believe air traffic will continue to grow, albeit at a slower pace. Earnings growth in the near term is also expected to be tempered by slower traffic growth and the higher base that was created in fiscal 2010/ 2011.”

While revenue rose 17.4% during the year, AAHK managed to contain the growth of operating expenses to just 4.9% and boosted operating margin to 66.3% from 62.3%. Airport and security charges rose 18.8% from a year ago to HK$4.07 billion, which was attributed mainly to robust air traffic and the end of the temporary 10% reduction in landing and parking charges for airlines in March 2010. Retail licences and advertising revenue grew 22.8% to HK$3.58 billion over the same period due to higher passenger volume. This category represented 33.8% of total turnover.

Commenting on AAHK’s financial position, William Lo Chi-chung, Executive Director, Finance, said, "With strong EBITDA generated by operations and the financial strength of our balance sheet, AAHK's borrowing is at a healthy level of 16%. Coupled with a stable business outlook and AAA credit rating, AAHK is well positioned to continue enhancing HKIA’s world-class service standards and expand its facilities to meet future demand."

Strong growth in cargo throughput helped HKIA surpass Memphis International Airport as the world’s busiest cargo airport. HKIA is also the third-busiest international passenger airport in the world. In fiscal 2010/2011, HKIA was named the world’s best airport by Airports Council International (among facilities serving over 40 million passengers annually), Skytrax and TTG Publishing.

Mr Hui commented, “All these achievements have reconfirmed HKIA’s status as one of the finest and busiest aviation centres in the world. Timely investments in our people, facilities and services are critical to maintaining our competitiveness.”

AAHK completed a HK$4.5 billion capacity and service enhancement programme last year. “In fiscal 2011/2012, we will embark upon a three-year, HK$495 million rejuvenation programme to enhance our system reliability and customer satisfaction. We will also start construction on the Phase 1 development of the Midfield in the third quarter of 2011,” added Mr Hui.

Expected to be completed in 2015, the Phase 1 Midfield development includes a new Midfield Concourse with 20 parking stands, a new cross-field taxiway and the extension of the existing automated people mover (APM) to the Midfield Concourse.

The rejuvenation programme will overhaul some of HKIA’s utilities, airfield ground lighting as well as electrical, mechanical, loading bridge and baggage handling systems. In addition, the airport’s public washrooms will be renovated and the APM and apron bus facilities will be refurbished.

To address the airport’s long-term needs, AAHK released the Hong Kong International Airport Master Plan 2030 in early June and put forward two airport development options for a three-month public consultation, which will end on 2 September 2011.

Mr Hui said, “It is important to recognise that infrastructure such as HKIA plays a critical supporting role for Hong Kong. Aviation, including the airport, underpins the four pillars of the Hong Kong economy: financial services, trading and logistics, tourism, and producer and professional services. Infrastructure development will provide benefits to Hong Kong for generation after generation. We are firmly committed to ensuring that HKIA continues to be a regional and international aviation centre, and that it contributes to the long-term sustainable growth of Hong Kong.”

AAHK has a proven track record of sustainability and green initiatives in its day-to-day operations and development activities. Over the past financial year, AAHK reduced its carbon emissions by an equivalent of 4,030 tonnes through the use of clean fuel and optimisation measures for its chiller, lighting, escalator and lift systems, among others.

HKIA and around 40 business partners also pledged to reduce the airport’s carbon intensity by 25% per workload unit by 2015, making HKIA one of the world’s first to introduce such an airport-wide programme. It also marked the first voluntary, sector-wide carbon-intensity reduction pledge in Hong Kong.

AAHK’s Mainland joint ventures continued to make steady progress in terms of their financial results and traffic performances. During the year, AAHK also established sister airport relationships with Beijing Capital International Airport and Chicago O’Hare International Airport.

-- Ends --

Download the Annual Report 2010/11 :
http://www.hongkongairport.com/eng/b...s-2010-11.html
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Old June 30th, 2011, 09:13 AM   #3833
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Airport upgrade warrants more options
11 June 2011
China Daily - Hong Kong Edition

On June 2 the Airport Authority (AA) released its "Hong Kong International Airport Master Plan 2030". One option outlined is a plan to upgrade the two existing runways at a cost of HK$23.4 billion with HK$432 billion of economic benefits. The other option is to build a third runway with an investment of HK$86.2 billion, accruing HK$912 billion of economic benefits over 50 years.

Which one do you choose? As the first upgrading option will still see saturation of airport capacity by 2017, then the obvious answer is the second option judging by its face value. I will certainly vote for option two if there is no third option on the table. But are there in fact any more viable alternatives?

I believe other related factors should be considered before making any decision. The first is about the site area and location of the airport. With two existing runways, the total site area of the airport is about 1,255 hectares. With an additional third runway, the total site area would then be 1,905 hectares. That is to say about 650 hectares of land will have to be reclaimed from the sea for the second option to work. As the reclamation will be carried out at a rather deeper seabed compared with the existing runway, the land reclamation alone will cost HK$38.9 billion plus an additional HK$9 billion to prevent the release of toxic mud.

This cost will be sufficient to build a new airport in the New Territories with one runway (option three). Then the new second airport could cater for another runway and meet needs beyond the 2030s or 2040s. But in the current option two, when all three runways are at full capacity by the 2030s, it will be impossible to build the fourth runway. So what will our options be if other potential locations have already been occupied?

The second factor concerns economic benefit. At first glimpse, one may believe the economic benefits from option two (HK$912 billion) is much better than option one (HK$432 billion), but if the investment between option two (HK$86.2 billion) and option one (HK$23.4 billion) are compared, it appears that option one will produce better benefits in terms of returns in the future, provided that there is another airport development before option one is saturated in 2017. If this is the case, then the combination of option one and option three appears to be better than option two alone.

Both option one and option two have the same capacity of 34 flights per runway per hour, thus the total capacity of option one ( with two runways) will be 68, and option two (with three runways) 102 per hour respectively. My third related issue is with how we can increase this capacity. Technically speaking, the capacity of any runway depends on aircraft types, its taxiway system, air traffic control techniques, and apron capacity, landing aids etc. If all conditions are satisfactory, the world maximum figure could rise to 50 flights per hour under the Visual Flight Rule. I wonder whether the Hong Kong record could be improved from 34 to 40 or 45 flights per hour without sacrificing safety as the first priority. If the capacity for the existing runways to handle flight movement could be substantially expanded, then the time before saturation would be extended.

The fourth factor regards the air traffic forecast. Flight movements at Chek Lap Kok International Airport have risen on average by 6.5 percent per year, and the two existing runways will become saturated by 2017. Although the growth figures may be accurate in retrospect, it may not necessarily have the same accuracy in forecasting the future. The reasons are twofold: one is the competition from adjacent airports, particularly Shenzhen Baoan Airport and Guangzhou Baiyun Airport. As they can build their airports with similar flight capacity at a cost of about 10 percent of that of Hong Kong, they collect much less airport charges than Hong Kong. Notwithstanding that the Hong Kong AA is operating under prudent commercial principles, Hong Kong AA may not compete with its adjacent counterparts respecting airport charges as Hong Kong has a much more expansive airport.

The other reason is the development of the super railway and highway networks on the mainland. In light of China developing the fastest super railway system in the world, a short-haul flight of up to 800 kilometers cannot compete in terms of cost and time, unless Hong Kong can have much shorter check-in time, cheaper tickets and more frequent flights. Medium-haul flights of about 2,000 km may also find it difficult to compete with the super railway network. With a more convenient highway network, Hong Kong residents who live in Kowloon and New Territories (East and North) may also prefer to use Shenzhen Baoan Airport rather than Hong Kong Chek Lap kok Airport in the future.

Based on this twofold analysis, I believe the forecast of 6.5 percent growth is too optimistic as short distance flights will be reduced, and medium-haul flights may have not grown as expected. If I remember correctly, the government had briefed the Legislative Council on its plan to proceed with the privatization exercise of the airport in February 2004, and the Economic Development and Labour Bureau published a consultation document on Partial Privatization of the AA in November 2004 that showed an unsatisfactory equity return of less than 2 percent in a worst-case scenario. It would be really interesting to note what made the AA take a U-turn on the subject of airport development.

I do not mean to discourage Hong Kong airport development. On the contrary, I strongly believe Hong Kong should have a wise strategy for airport development in order to maintain its status as a center of international and regional aviation as required by Article 128 of the Basic Law. More options and deeper study are needed.

The author is a current affairs commentator.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 09:25 PM   #3834
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 07:58 PM   #3835
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Aviation passenger fuel surcharges adjusted
Tuesday, June 21, 2011
Government Press Release

The Civil Aviation Department (CAD) today (June 21) gave approval for passenger fuel surcharges levied by two airlines to be reduced for the period from July 1 to 31.

The new maximum levels of fuel surcharges will be $221 for short-haul flights and $1,069 for long-haul flights, which represent reductions of six per cent and five per cent from the current maximum levels for short- and long-haul flights respectively. The applicable surcharge levels are based on the ticket issue date. (These airlines and their newly approved fuel surcharge levels are listed in the Annex.)

Passenger fuel surcharges seek to allow airlines to partially recover the increase in operational costs due to fluctuations in aviation fuel prices. As the aeronautical authority in Hong Kong, the CAD considers and approves fuel surcharge applications from the airlines in accordance with bilateral Air Services Agreements.

Passenger fuel surcharges are reviewed regularly by the CAD. The last review was done at the end of May when the maximum surcharge levels approved by the CAD were $236 for short-haul flights and $1,124 for long-haul flights.
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Old July 5th, 2011, 05:32 PM   #3836
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Old July 6th, 2011, 10:40 AM   #3837
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Old July 7th, 2011, 05:11 AM   #3838
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Chopper tail rotor fell off, report says
Investigators will now focus on why parts broke off Macau-bound aircraft before plunging into Victoria Harbour last July

30 June 2011
South China Morning Post

The entire tail rotor assembly fell off a Macau-bound helicopter before the aircraft ditched in Victoria Harbour last year, a government investigation report says.

Investigators have ruled out engine failure and are now trying to establish why the assembly became detached, the report says.

The assembly broke off while the Italian-made twin-engine AgustaWestland AW139 helicopter was climbing after take-off from the Shun Tak Centre helipad in Sheung Wan and had reached an altitude of about 350 feet on July 3 last year.

Putting the 15-seater helicopter into auto-rotation, the pilots made a controlled ditching in Victoria Harbour. All 13 people on board were rescued. The helicopter subsequently overturned and the entire fuselage became submerged, but emergency floats kept the aircraft floating upside down.

The seven-page interim report, released yesterday, said one of the four blades of the tail rotor, the top section of the vertical tail, the associated drive shaft, control rods and cover fairings were missing after the crash.

Inspection of the wreckage found damage to the vertical tail section that "appeared to be consistent with the effect of high vibration of the tail rotor under power", it said.

Other damage found to the horizontal stabiliser area on the tail could have been "consequential damage resulting from the departed tail rotor".

The tail rotor assembly and the fractured parts of the vertical tail section have been sent for detailed forensic structural inspection and analysis.

"Analysis of the flight data revealed that the engines were operating with the required power at the time of accident and ruled out the mechanical failure of any engine component," the report said.

The investigation is being conducted under the direction of the Civil Aviation Department with help from Macau's Civil Aviation Authority, the Italian Air Safety Board, Britain's Air Accidents Investigation Branch, the National Transportation Safety Board in the United States and the manufacturer of the helicopter.

The Civil Aviation Department said the interim report contained information "as determined up to the time of issue" and must be regarded as "tentative".

"The investigation team will continue to investigate the circumstances and causes relating to the accident," a spokesman said.
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Old July 8th, 2011, 05:00 AM   #3839
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We need to ask ourselves if a third runway is really needed at Hong Kong's airport
15 June 2011
SCMP

We now have proposals to build a third runway at Chek Lap Kok. Predictably, and understandably, these have been made and supported by those who stand to benefit (the Airport Authority, the airlines and the construction industry).

And, as always, the projections have been made on a "business-as-usual" model which simply extrapolates the present position.

These are valid, albeit narrow, views and the approach is one which readily presents itself, but they may not bring the right outcome for Hong Kong.

We have seen many such proposals in Hong Kong which have been based on an incomplete appreciation of what the future might and should hold. The Lok Ma Chau spur line was an immensely costly construction project intended to relieve congestion at Lo Wu. Before it was completed, electric card readers at Lo Wu had achieved this at a fraction of the price.

On the mega-project scale, which the third runway indeed is, we have the example of the container port.

The recent Port 2020 study similarly extrapolated existing figures and arrived at the need for a new port, CT 10 [container terminal 10]. This might have obliged a 245-hectare reclamation off Tai O.

It reached the chief executive's policy address. Fortunately, saner heads prevailed, as it has long been clear that our fine port is close to a sunset industry, having been supplanted by new ports in the major market - the mainland. And so to the airport expansion. Will increased aircraft movements be acceptable in a world which is struggling to reduce its carbon footprint?

What about air quality and health for our own residents? Will the new high-speed railways (and our own express rail link) reduce the demand for flights to the mainland?

Will short-haul aircraft become larger, enabling absolute numbers of planes to be reduced? What will happen to our iconic dolphins? What are the issues and trends, and where should Hong Kong position itself in the Pearl River Delta?

The size, cost and environmental implications of a third runway require us all to think outside the box. By all means hear the views of vested interests, but let us get this right. We have enough recent experience of inadequately planned infrastructure projects in Hong Kong, and we cannot afford another one - not on this scale.

Clive Noffke, Green Lantau Association
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Old July 9th, 2011, 05:52 AM   #3840
hkskyline
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Source : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tobylam/with/5893623470/

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr
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