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Old February 21st, 2014, 04:04 AM   #4481
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What prompted the design change in the new passenger concourse?
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Old February 21st, 2014, 06:41 PM   #4482
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Don't think the concourse in the newly-reclaimed area is set in stone yet. They haven't even done all the feasibility studies for reclamation.
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Old February 21st, 2014, 07:40 PM   #4483
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Old February 21st, 2014, 07:50 PM   #4484
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Don't think the concourse in the newly-reclaimed area is set in stone yet. They haven't even done all the feasibility studies for reclamation.
I wouldn't think so either but the original design layout didn't make much sense to me.

All speculation now, but who do you think will be using the new terminal? Given how much money CX has poured into renovating their new lounges, I am guessing CX will be staying put as with the oneworld airlines. One of the renderings show a SQ plane (not that it should be use as an indicator anyway), but it seems to make sense to move the Star carriers over?
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Old February 21st, 2014, 08:34 PM   #4485
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One thing I don't understand is how the airport thinks that a mere extension of baggage claim and immigration areas is sufficient for the concourse on the reclaimed land. As it is, the existing facilities could do with an extension. I fly to Hong Kong fairly frequently and those queue lines for immigration just gets longer and longer with every visit.
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Old February 21st, 2014, 09:31 PM   #4486
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddes View Post
One thing I don't understand is how the airport thinks that a mere extension of baggage claim and immigration areas is sufficient for the concourse on the reclaimed land. As it is, the existing facilities could do with an extension. I fly to Hong Kong fairly frequently and those queue lines for immigration just gets longer and longer with every visit.


Looking at the rendering, the people mover will connect the future concourse with T2, not T1. Perhaps some process re-engineering will take place.
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Old February 24th, 2014, 05:07 AM   #4487
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LCQ20: Emission levels of air pollutants from aircrafts at Hong Kong International Airport
Government Press Release
Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Following is a question by the Hon Albert Chan and a written reply by the Secretary for the Environment, Mr Wong Kam-sing, in the Legislative Council today (February 19):

Question:

At the Council meeting on October 19, 2011, I asked the authorities about the emission levels of various types of air pollutants from aircraft movements and aircraft parking at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) each year between 2009 and 2010, and whether the authorities had taken measures to reduce the emissions from aircraft so as to alleviate the problem of air pollution in Tung Chung and thereby reduce the impact of air pollutants on the health of Tung Chung residents. The authorities indicated in their reply that they had taken measures to reduce emissions of air pollutants and carbon from aircraft. Yet, residents in Tung Chung have still relayed to me that the number of flights operating at HKIA has been growing constantly in the recent three years and aircraft emissions have also increased correspondingly, hence worsening the air quality in Tung Chung and affecting the health of the residents in the district. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council:

(1) whether it knows the emission levels of various types of air pollutants from aircraft movements and aircraft parking at HKIA each year between 2011 and 2013, with a breakdown, by aircraft model in table form, of the emission levels of various types of air pollutants from aircraft, as well as which aircraft model had the highest level of emissions, and what measures currently have been put in place by the authorities to reduce emissions from aircraft of such models;

(2) whether it has assessed if the worsening of the air quality in Tung Chung in recent years is related to the increase in air pollutant emissions from aircraft; if the assessment outcome is in the affirmative, to what extent the increase in emissions from aircraft has led to the worsening of air quality in Tung Chung; if the assessment outcome is in the negative, of the reasons for that; and

(3) whether it will take new measures to reduce the impact of the air pollutants emitted by aircraft on the health of Tung Chung residents; if it will, of the details; if not, the reasons for that?

Reply:

President,

The numbers of arrival and departure of aircraft at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) between 2011 and 2013 and the air pollutant emissions in 2011 are set out in Annex 1. As the compilation of air pollutant emissions for 2012 and 2013 is underway, we cannot provide the aircraft emission data for these two years.

Aircraft emissions of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, respirable suspended particulates, volatile organic compounds and carbon monoxide accounted for 1 per cent, 4 per cent, 1 per cent, 1 per cent and 3 per cent of Hong Kong's overall emissions respectively in 2011.

The total quantities of air pollutants emitted from individual model of aircraft depend on various factors including the numbers of their arrivals and departures in a year, the type, size and number of their engines. Even for aircraft of the same model, they may not have engines of the same types or sizes and could have different quantities of emissions. In general, bigger aircraft with higher arrival and departure frequencies will have greater quantities of emissions. Based on the aircraft arrival and departure data of the HKIA in 2011 released by Civil Aviation Department (CAD), the percentage shares of emissions for different types of aircraft are set out in Annex 2.

Air pollutants emissions from different types of commercial aircraft vary with the engine design, aircraft size and passenger load. The CAD has adopted the standards set out at Annex 16 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation (hereinafter referred to as "the Chicago Convention"), Volume 2, Part III, Chapter 2 (Turbojet and turbofan engines intended for propulsion only at subsonic speeds) to certify engines on commercial aircraft registered in Hong Kong. This document specifies the standards for four types of emissions that an aircraft engine has to meet, namely, smoke, unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides. Commercial aircraft registered elsewhere also meet generally the standards set out at Annex 16 to the Chicago Convention. To reduce their air pollutant emissions, aircraft that use the HKIA are required to meet the international standards for aircraft engine emissions.

(2) Apart from aircraft emissions, air quality in Tung Chung is also influenced by regional air quality and other local emission sources. Over the past three years, the air pollutant concentration data recorded at the Tung Chung general air quality monitoring station did not reveal any apparent change in air quality as a result of the increase in aircraft movements. There was a slight decrease in respirable suspended particulates concentrations in Tung Chung whereas concentrations of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and ozone, an air pollutant related to regional photochemical smog problem, were relatively steady. Please refer to Annex 3 for the detailed data.

(3) Since October 22, 2009, the CAD has implemented new air routes which shorten the travelling distance for aircraft approaching from the west and north of Hong Kong. Hence, a flight to Hong Kong from the Mainland, South East Asia and Europe can save up to about 210 km in flight journey, that is about 14 minutes in flight time. The shortened air routes and the reduced flight time can help reduce aircraft's air pollutant emissions. In 2013, a total of over 70,000 flights adopted these shortened routes. Besides, the CAD will continue to implement international standards in certifying aircraft engines, and to closely monitor and follow the international requirements in this respect.

Since the operation of the HKIA, the Airport Authority (AA) has been providing electricity powered fixed ground power (FGP) and pre-conditioned air (PCA) systems for aircraft at parking stands to reduce the operation time of onboard fuel combustion auxiliary power generation units, and thereby reduce emissions. In 2011, about 80 per cent of passenger flights have adopted the FGP and PCA systems. The AA is going to mandate the use of FGP and PCA at parking stands before end of 2014 with a view to further reducing aircraft emissions.

Annex : http://gia.info.gov.hk/general/20140...302_124852.pdf
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Old February 28th, 2014, 06:52 PM   #4488
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Brakes on Jetstar's expansion in Asia
28 February 2014
The Age

Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce has put the brakes on Jetstar's aggressive expansion in Asia as losses mount due to growing competition from incumbent airlines and new start-ups.

Jetstar is also under attack on domestic routes from Tigerair Australia and its majority shareholder Virgin Australia, which was partly responsible for a dramatic slump in its financial fortunes.

The airline has also indicated its bid for regulatory approval to launch a new Jetstar offshoot in Hong Kong will drag on for months. As a result, Jetstar Hong Kong has been forced to park at least seven A320 aircraft in France.

In a major change of direction, Qantas has pulled back on its aggressive expansion into Asia by halting growth at Singaporean budget airline Jetstar Asia. Qantas has a 49 per cent stake in Jetstar Asia. "This is a significant reprioritisation of our growth to focus on the areas that we must continue to invest in," Mr Joyce told investors on Thursday as he sought to rein in costs by $2 billion over three years.

The other Jetstar-branded joint ventures are in Japan and Vietnam. Stiff competition in south-east Asia stripped $29 million from Jetstar's earnings.

The budget offshoot sunk to a $16 million loss in the first half, a dramatic turnaround on a $128 million profit previously.

The Jetstar losses were blamed on "market capacity oversupply driving yield decline in south-east Asia, market growth ahead of demand in the Australian domestic market" and fuel costs.

Jetstar chief executive Jayne Hrdlicka said the company remained committed to launching a low-cost airline in Hong Kong despite stiff opposition from Cathay Pacific. "We remain very pragmatic and practical about how long it will take and the Jetstar Hong Kong board is making a decision to ensure that there is no additional invested capital required given the extended timeline," she said.

Qantas has also made a big rejig of its large order of new A320 planes in order to reduce its financial exposure, which is one of the reasons it has been able to cut its capital investment by $1 billion over the next two years.

Ms Hrdlicka said the changes to the A320 order with European manufacturer Airbus were due to the "lower growth environment in Australia and based on a very pragmatic view about what the joint ventures will and won't need from the Qantas Group".

WHAT THEY SAID

“We have already made tough decisions and nobody should doubt that there are more ahead ... We will be a far leaner Qantas group.” Qantas CEO Alan Joyce

“Why should the government do for one what it’s not prepared to do for all, or what is not necessarily available for all.” Prime Minister Tony Abbott

“No company has fought harder to transform in response to these new economic realities.” Alan Joyce

“It’s outrageous that so many Qantas [and Jetstar] staff are going to bear the brunt of the poor business decisions made by Qantas in recent times.” Australian Services Union assistant national secretary Linda White

“The Qantas wage and cost structure places [Qantas] at a significant disadvantage to the people they are flying alongside.” Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss

“Qantas needs to open its books to the government to reveal if it’s the Qantas Sale Act or lousy management and strategy to blame for the crisis.” Senator Nick Xenophon

“We want to ensure that Qantas is not competing against its rivals with a ball and chain around its leg.” Tony Abbott

“We want Qantas to be an Australian company.” Senior Labor frontbencher Tony Burke

The government should be “twisting management’s arm to be open and honest about where the airline is heading. Otherwise, it is like supporting a plan to bulldoze half a house before the blueprints to rebuild have been drawn.” Australian and International Pilots Association president Nathan Safe

“We would have liked to see some more fundamental reform.”

Commonwealth Bank aviation analyst Matt Crowe
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Old March 2nd, 2014, 06:23 AM   #4489
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Bigger planes and fewer routes seen as runway fix
1 March 2014
South China Morning Post

Aviation authorities in talks with airport and airlines to increase landing slot capacity

Hong Kong-based carriers, including Cathay Pacific Airways, are being urged by the Civil Aviation Department to use larger aircraft and consolidate routes as the airport risks running out of landing slots as early as next year.

The airport is now seeing 65 take-offs and landings an hour during peak operating hours from 10am to 1pm, the maximum number allowed on its two runways.

“The hourly capacity of the two runways is expected to increase to 68 movements in 2015 during certain busy hours of the day, while room for substantially lifting the capacity would be limited,” said Raymond Li, the aviation department’s chief air traffic control officer.

“Only one to two additional slots could be added after the upgrading programme of the air traffic management system is finished.”

The air navigation system is migrating from a ground-based radar to a satellite-based system to increase air traffic control capabilities within the 200 nautical mile radius controlled by Hong Kong and to boost capacity.

The present movement cap at Chek Lap Kok has often been criticised, as the number appears to be short of international standards. For example, the two runways at London Heathrow Airport can handle more than 80 aircraft an hour.

But Li said the presence of Lantau Peak to the south and the mix of aircraft types in Hong Kong had an impact on runway capacity.

The ratio of wide-body aircraft in Hong Kong, 65 per cent to 70 per cent of the total, was much higher than at Heathrow, and they required a separation of 90 to 120 seconds for landing and taking off, while narrow-body aircraft needed just 60 to 70 seconds, he said.

“In the meantime, we are in talks with the Airport Authority and airlines to increase the capacity of the airport in light of the runway constraints,” Li said.

The Airport Authority has kicked off projects to provide more parking spaces for aircraft and a new mid-field concourse will be finished next year.

Li said airlines were being urged to adjust their business plans accordingly, including using larger aircraft and focusing more on popular destinations.

Cathay Pacific has placed orders for 102 passenger aircraft since 2010, 67 of them with 315 to 400 seats, including Airbus 350-900s, A350-1000s and Boeing 777-9Xs, the airline said in December last year.

“Capacity constraints at Hong Kong airport have always been an issue as the airport is now approaching its maximum runway capacity,” a Cathay spokesman said. “This makes the development of a third runway at the airport urgent and essential.”

One airline executive has suggested a radical solution to the peak hour problem. Airlines should be allowed to bid for the best time slots, as was done at Heathrow, Hong Kong Express Airways deputy chief executive Andrew Cowen said.

But analysts said that would be a last resort move because of objections from incumbent airlines.
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Old March 4th, 2014, 06:16 PM   #4490
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image hosted on flickr
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Old March 5th, 2014, 05:23 AM   #4491
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LH B-748 @ HKG

LH B-748 @ HKG, Feb 26th 2014



source: photo by Cafe am Yachthafen
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Old March 5th, 2014, 05:42 PM   #4492
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Maintenance costs 30pc less in Asia, analysts say
6 March 2014
The Australian

CHANGING critical sections of the Qantas Sale Act would allow Qantas to send hundreds of maintenance jobs overseas, with cheaper labour costs being a central factor behind any decision to export the jobs to Asian countries.

Market analysts said yesterday that passage of the changes through the Senate could ultimately lead to heavy maintenance work on its domestic fleet being shifted from Brisbane to Asia.

But analysts and unions were split on whether it would be cost-effective for Qantas to fly empty domestic aircraft to Asian ports instead of continuing to perform the maintenance in Australia.

Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce said yesterday that airline would continue to investigate opportunities to perform work overseas. ``It is already part of what we do, and how we operate,'' he said. ``And we, to be efficient, will have to continue to look at how you balance up the efficiencies here in Australia and get a critical mass, and how you balance up the work offshore to get these efficiencies if you can't.''

Commonwealth Bank analyst Matt Crowe said changing the legislation would give Qantas increased flexibility, including a greater capacity for offshore work.

Another senior analyst, who declined to be named, predicted Qantas would shift maintenance work overseas due to cheaper labour costs. ``Labour costs are 20 to 30 per cent cheaper in Asia,'' the analyst said.

But Steve Purvinas, federal secretary of the Australian Licensed Aircraft Engineers Association, said any cost savings would be marginal given Qantas would have to fly empty domestic aircraft to the overseas ports.

Qantas does heavy maintenance on more than 110 planes at its Brisbane centre, including its fleet of Boeing 737s, Boeing 767s and Airbus A330s. About 600 staff work at the centre, and Mr Joyce said yesterday it was being run efficiently with ``good work practices''. Two 747s scheduled for maintenance checks in May will be sent to Hong Kong-based maintenance group HAECO.

Qantas International head of maintenance Alan Milne has said that there were no suitable facilities in Australia for 747 maintenance and that the size of the fleet meant it was not economic to do the work in Australia.
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Old March 8th, 2014, 01:23 PM   #4493
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Reach for the skies over HK
The Standard
Wednesday, February 26, 2014

More than most cities, Hong Kong is about transportation. Its history as a base for sea-based trade goes back centuries, and its success as a business center today would be impossible without its extensive metro, bus and ferry networks.

And then there's aviation. The first flight in Hong Kong was in 1911, when a pioneering Belgian pilot named Charles van den Born took off in his Farman biplane from Sha Tin.

Commercial services started in the 1930s. By the time Kai Tak closed and the new airport at Chek Lap Kok opened in 1998, Hong Kong was one of the biggest passenger and freight air hubs in the world.

The whole story is presented in a big and highly illustrated book called Hong Kong High by Cliff Dunnaway, recently published by Odyssey Books. It is a fully bilingual volume, and is packed with photographs, many in color, and maps and diagrams. The earliest pictures show van den Born and his fragile-looking aircraft surrounded by curious crowds in Sha Tin.

The book gives a vivid idea of how far aviation has come over the years. With low cruising speeds and frequent refueling stops, a flight to Europe in the 1930s could easily take six days.

It goes over subjects like the introduction of helicopters to Hong Kong, the development of what is now the Government Flying Service and the modern roles of our current five airlines. It is a history of Hong Kong in the skies.

Bernard Charnwut Chan is chairman of the Advisory Committee on Revitalisation of Historic Buildings.
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Old March 11th, 2014, 07:24 PM   #4494
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Airport chief eyes start on third runway in September
The Standard
Tuesday, March 11, 2014

The environmental assessment report will be ready by the end of this month and work on the third runway at the Hong Kong International Airport could begin as early as September.

Airport Authority chief executive Stanley Hui Hon-chung told The Standard's sister paper, Sing Tao Daily, the report will be submitted to the Environmental Protection Department at the end of March and he expects to receive the environmental permits by September.

Hui said the report will include the impact of reclamation on the ecology and its impact on human health, as well as possible solutions. It will also deal with noise pollution.

As an example, Hui said the technology coping with air quality affected by takeoffs and landings has been improving. Emission has been reduced to only 2 percent of the air pollutants while flight capacity has been increased.

The authority's target will be to reduce emission by half in 2050, Hui said, adding that it has also promised not to make further reclamation. "I personally think further reclamation is impossible. We should put a stop there."

Hui said international experts invited to study the Chinese white dolphins found that they would leave the area during construction but will return after the work is completed. He said the authority may also work with Ocean Park to set up shore parks in order to relieve the impact on the dolphins.

If green groups refuse to accept international standards, "I have nothing to add," Hui said.

Hui stressed the urgency of a third runway as the number of passengers, freight and flights have increased from 1,000 flights each day on average last summer to about 1,100 flights this year.

The daily maximum capacity of 1,200 flights could soon be reached, Hui said.

The authority is studying the development of the North Commercial District and a "concrete working scheme" will be ready by the middle of the year.

Commercial development needs to be considered when the number of passengers increase, Hui said.

He said the construction costs, which are about HK$130 billion, have increased sharply from HK$86.2 billion in 2010 and could increase further if there are more delays.
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Old March 12th, 2014, 07:05 AM   #4495
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A bit out of topic, which Cathay Pacific's route is currently the longest route served by Boeing 747-400?
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Old March 12th, 2014, 10:08 AM   #4496
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bagus70 View Post
A bit out of topic, which Cathay Pacific's route is currently the longest route served by Boeing 747-400?
JNB and SFO
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Last edited by hkskyline; March 12th, 2014 at 10:48 AM. Reason: added JNB
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Old March 12th, 2014, 10:11 AM   #4497
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What about their European route? Which one is normally served by Boeing 747-400 aside of London?
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Old March 12th, 2014, 10:20 AM   #4498
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Quote:
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What about their European route? Which one is normally served by Boeing 747-400 aside of London?
All gone. They are being retired quickly. The 747's are used mostly on regional routes these days such as DPS, PEK, CTS and BOM.
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Old March 12th, 2014, 11:20 AM   #4499
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Or occasionally: Surabaya
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Old March 16th, 2014, 01:14 PM   #4500
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Qantas 'could send 10,000 jobs offshore'
15 March 2014
The Advertiser

AS many as 10,000 Qantas jobs, including maintenance work, could be sent offshore despite fresh safety concerns.

Embattled Qantas boss Alan Joyce, right, yesterday refused to rule out additional job losses to the 5000 recently announced if proposed changes to the Qantas Sale Act allowed the iconic airline to locate more of its business offshore.

“I can’t rule anything in or out,” he told a parliamentary committee in Sydney, arguing that Qantas, like its rival Virgin, should have no limit on how many jobs it can offshore.

“We need for the future the same flexibility our competitor has. So if our competitor has the ability, which it does, to do all of its heavy maintenance, its call centres, everything, offshore then for Qantas to compete on a level playing field, to have the same options as that competition, it needs the same freedom,” Mr Joyce said.

The assistant national secretary of the Australian Services Union, Linda White, warned that 10,000 jobs - one in three - could potentially be based offshore. While staff at check-in desks would likely remain Australian, call centre and freight staff would probably be moved.

But a submission to the inquiry by the Australian Licenced Aircraft Engineers Association has raised a series of safety concerns about the standard of work in international maintenance facilities.

The association head, Stephen Purvinas, said aircraft regularly came back from offshore maintenance facilities with “gross errors” in them.

He highlighted the case of an aircraft serviced in Hong Kong that came back with the washers screwed on upside down on three out of four aircraft engines.

While Australian maintenance facilities had one licenced engineer for every two unlicensed engineers, in Hong Kong there was just one licenced engineer to supervise eight unlicensed workers.


In Singapore, the ratio was 1 to 11, in the Philippines 1 to 22. “It’s a way they make themselves cheaper ... We say it’s dangerous. We have plenty of examples of things that have gone wrong on Qantas aeroplanes,” he said.

He also accused the Civil Aviation Safety Authority of being the subject of “corporate capture” by Qantas, failing to act quickly on complaints.Mr Joyce said that was “absurd”. Any passenger who had ever travelled on a non-Qantas aeroplane would already have travelled on an offshore-maintained aircraft, he said.
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