daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Airports and Aviation > Airports

Airports discussions about existing airports



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


View Poll Results: Scale from 1 to 10, 10 being SUPER and 1 being BAD, what would you rate the Airport??
1 3 3.57%
2 0 0%
3 0 0%
4 0 0%
5 0 0%
6 1 1.19%
7 7 8.33%
8 9 10.71%
9 28 33.33%
10 36 42.86%
Voters: 84. You may not vote on this poll

Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 25th, 2014, 07:11 AM   #4521
EK413
Registered User
 
EK413's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,891
Likes (Received): 1895

It would appear CX has won the battle, not that I'm surprised.
While JQ Hong Kong is waiting for its operating permit, a bunch of A320s ordered by Qantas remain in storage. Now today a spotter in TLS taken a photo of one of the stored A320's in a weird hybrid livery. Would appear this A320 will be transferred to Tianjin Airlines:

[IMG]http://i61.************/ir41vk.jpg[/IMG]

www.flickr.com/photos/bycac/14002097373/

I guess JQ Hong Kong won't be getting its wings anytime soon...
__________________
EK413
Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. We are tonight’s entertainment!
EK413 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old April 25th, 2014, 05:26 PM   #4522
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Is it a wet lease?

Haven't heard any news Jetstar's application has been rejected.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 25th, 2014, 10:54 PM   #4523
EK413
Registered User
 
EK413's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,891
Likes (Received): 1895

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Is it a wet lease? Haven't heard any news Jetstar's application has been rejected.
I'm not sure in regards to the terms of the lease, however it's a clear sign the JQ HKG venture is turning out to be a flop.
__________________
EK413
Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. We are tonight’s entertainment!
EK413 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 8th, 2014, 05:27 AM   #4524
Bluemooncm78
Registered User
 
Bluemooncm78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Djekardah
Posts: 9,014
Likes (Received): 8053

HKG6514-P8402 by bluemooncm78, on Flickr

HKG6514-P8404 by bluemooncm78, on Flickr

Some new luxury stores:
HKG6514-P8408 by bluemooncm78, on Flickr

HKG6514-P8409 by bluemooncm78, on Flickr

HKG6514-P8407 by bluemooncm78, on Flickr

HKG6514-P8411 by bluemooncm78, on Flickr
Bluemooncm78 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2014, 05:55 AM   #4525
Bluemooncm78
Registered User
 
Bluemooncm78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Djekardah
Posts: 9,014
Likes (Received): 8053

HKG in CX719 A333 B-HLN-P8427 by bluemooncm78, on Flickr

CX A333 B-HLN-P8429 by bluemooncm78, on Flickr
Bluemooncm78 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2014, 12:54 PM   #4526
ramakrishna1984
Registered User
 
ramakrishna1984's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 1,039
Likes (Received): 788

Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) experienced a 9.5% year-over-year increase in the passenger traffic in April 2014, compared with the same period last year.

ramakrishna1984 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 26th, 2014, 08:08 PM   #4527
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Air Traffic Shows Robust Growth in April

(HONG KONG, 18 May 2014) – Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) reported another month of solid growth in April, with increases in all three air traffic categories. During the month, the airport handled 5.4 million passengers, 362,000 tonnes of cargo and 32,700 flight movements. These figures represent year-on-year increases of 9.5%, 6.0% and 7.0% respectively.

The growth in passenger traffic in April was mainly due to a 30% year-on-year growth in Hong Kong resident traffic. Passenger traffic to/from Taiwan, Mainland China and Japan recorded the most significant increases.

Continued growth in cargo throughput last month was driven mainly by transshipments, which was up 18% from a year ago. During the month, cargo throughput to/from Mainland China improved most significantly compared to other key regions.

Stanley Hui Hon-chung, Chief Executive Officer of Airport Authority Hong Kong, said, "If we combine the traffic figures for March and April to even out the effects of the Easter holidays, we see strong year-on-year increases in passenger volume (6.2%), cargo tonnage (8.2%) and flight movements (6.6%). HKIA welcomed an average of 192,000 passengers per day over the four-day Easter holiday, which is 3.5% higher than the same period in 2013. These figures support our expectations that 2014 will be a solid year for HKIA, in line with the global economic recovery.

"As traffic volumes continue to rise, sustaining our world-class services and operational efficiency has become an even greater challenge. To streamline the airport experience for travellers and working in close partnership with the airlines, we have introduced self-service technologies such as self check-in kiosks and mobile boarding pass service, and started exploring self-service baggage drop-off for checked-in passengers. Our efforts have been recognised by the International Air Transport Association (IATA), which recently presented HKIA with Fast Travel Award Green status," Mr Hui added. The IATA is the trade association for the world’s airlines, representing some 240 airlines or 84% of total air traffic.

For the first four months of 2014, HKIA handled 20.4 million passengers, 1.4 million tonnes of cargo and 126,595 flight movements, registering year-on-year growth of 6.4%, 5.6% and 6.3% respectively.

On a rolling 12-month basis, passenger volume grew 6.8% to 61.1 million while cargo tonnage increased 3.6% to 4.2 million tonnes over the same period last year. The airport handled 379,600 flight movements during the period, up 6.5% year on year.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 27th, 2014, 04:15 PM   #4528
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Opposition to planned new low-cost airline puzzling
27 May 2014
China Daily

A chorus of voices has arisen to protest the possibility of Hong Kong getting a new low-cost airline. This is something of a puzzle. I do not recall a chorus of complaints when we were threatened - in vain, alas - with a low-cost supermarket. Cheaper phones or computers do not inspire opposition, regardless of where they are made.

There is scope for a certain amount of legal tap dancing here. Hong Kong's regulations in these matters require a "local" airline to have its principal place of business in Hong Kong. The current candidate, Jetstar, is the corporate offspring of an Australian company. This has allowed some of the more resourceful critics to suggest it would be illegal to license Jetstar or even - quelle horreur! - a breach of the Basic Law.

On the other hand, faced with a chorus of this kind, I am often reminded of the late, great economist Adam Smith, who said, "People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices."

Airlines are a regulated industry, for historical reasons. This exposes those currently engaged in the industry to the temptation to repel newcomers, and to use for this purpose whatever arguments come to hand. These battles used to be fought in public hearings of the Air Transport Licensing Authority. They often made interesting reading. Regular travelers would testify that the route concerned was already magnificently served by the incumbent (usually, but not always, Cathay Pacific) and would be countered by surveys suggesting large numbers of people were dying to see another airline on the route.

Witnesses appearing as representatives of the traveling public were occasionally subjected to scathing cross-examination. I still remember one man who after detailed questioning about his many contacts was reduced to attributing his views to people he had met in the Hong Kong Club. But in those days the discussions were comparatively gentlemanly, because all the airlines charged roughly the same prices anyway.

Nowadays we have changed all that. There are low-cost airlines which charge you extra for peanuts and luggage but offer a low basic fare. There are what we may tactlessly call high-cost airlines, which charge traditional prices and feed you. Which you prefer depends heavily on how long the flight is going to be. Flights within Europe now seem to be dominated by the cheapies, although this has its downside. A couple of years ago I met a Scottish bagpipe band who had flown from Edinburgh to Poznan on Ryanair, an early pioneer of charging extra for everything. In order to reap the advantages of the cheap basic price they had decided to travel in their heaviest clothes, which was the uniform they performed in. So they flew into Poland in the full kit: kilts, tunics, long socks, and huge hairy hats. This would probably not raise an eyebrow in Edinburgh but was very conspicuous in Poznan.

Our local high-price airline, Cathay Pacific, seems to be very high-price indeed. In fact if like me you look for the lowest price (or at least the lowest that doesn't involve Ryanair or Aeroflot), there is usually a cheaper alternative, so I rarely fly Cathay. But air ticket pricing has now become as mysterious as the inner workings of the Kremlin. The whole thing has been computerized, with bewildering results.

Still, at the end of the day it seems that ticket prices will behave roughly as Adam Smith predicted they would, and if a low-cost operator is introduced then prices generally will fall. This observation will no doubt cue much wailing from the current airlines along the lines of their imminent bankruptcy and faint hopes of making profits even under the present arrangements.

And this, I fear, is what all the fuss is about. Those airlines which currently enjoy "home" status do not wish to share it with a newcomer. They wish, in other words, to be protected. Some of the arguments offered make no bones about this - if outsiders are allowed to run flights from Hong Kong the money made will go abroad instead of staying here. But this argument could be used to resist foreign ownership of everything from taxicabs to hotels. The modern idea of regulation is that it is here to serve the interests of consumers, not producers.

The producers will not have this. Or at least they will not publicly admit it. They will parade as public servants, the moon creating the tide which lifts all boats, the originators of general prosperity to whom the making of a profit is a sort of happy by-product of their efforts to serve the people. Adam Smith again: "I have never known much good done by those who affected to trade for the public good."

The author's work in journalism has won him honors in the Hong Kong News Awards and the International Radio Festival of New York. He is well known as a columnist, reviewer and broadcaster.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

ScuderiaVincero liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 31st, 2014, 11:00 AM   #4529
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132









__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 1st, 2014, 05:46 PM   #4530
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Source : http://pic.feeyo.com/posts/607/6071682.html





































































__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

EPA001, ovnours liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2014, 02:11 PM   #4531
g.yau
Registered User
 
g.yau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: London
Posts: 24
Likes (Received): 8

In depth video of new 3rd runway concourse



A very positive design outcome.
I quite like the new proposed T2 roof, brings in a lot more light and slightly relates to T1's architecture. The 3rd runway concourse reminds me of Beijing's T3 and Kuwait's new terminal a bit. I wonder how they're going to allocate which airlines are based in the new concourse, apart from the current T2 airlines e.g. TG, PR etc....

Great to see that HKIA is growing once again.
__________________

Last edited by g.yau; June 4th, 2014 at 02:20 PM.
g.yau no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2014, 02:31 PM   #4532
cfredo
Registered User
 
cfredo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Stuttgart/Frankfurt
Posts: 888
Likes (Received): 1335

Quote:
Originally Posted by g.yau View Post
I wonder how they're going to allocate which airlines are based in the new concourse, apart from the current T2 airlines e.g. TG, PR etc....
One possibility would be to separate the airline alliances. For example Cathay Pacific and the other OneWorld members could stay at T1 while the other airlines move to the new concourse.
Afaik they did the same thing in Beijing: Air China and other Star Alliance members moved to T3 while the rest stayed at T1 and T2.
cfredo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2014, 09:08 AM   #4533
EK413
Registered User
 
EK413's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,891
Likes (Received): 1895

[IMG]http://i58.************/n683zq.jpg[/IMG]
http://www.airliners.net/photo/Atlas...5fe82da52b9ea2
__________________
EK413
Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. We are tonight’s entertainment!
EK413 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 7th, 2014, 06:18 PM   #4534
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Source : http://pic.feeyo.com/posts/607/6074047.html

__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 8th, 2014, 11:44 PM   #4535
Aenelia
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: 진주유차나라 !
Posts: 189
Likes (Received): 24

Wow thanks for sharing the video. So I understand this is the final design and everything is set for construction to start on the extension?
Aenelia no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2014, 06:52 PM   #4536
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Airlines Pursue Chinese Leisure Travelers With New U.S.-China Flights
Some New Routes Would Connect Second-Tier Cities in Both Countries
10 June 2014
The Wall Street Journal

HONG KONG—Airlines in the U.S. and China are adding a flurry of new connections between the two countries, emboldened by signs of economic recovery in the U.S. and rising travel demand in China, but persistently high fuel prices and intensifying competition might undercut their profitability.

American Airlines Group Inc., the largest U.S. airline by traffic, will launch new routes this week to Shanghai and Hong Kong and from its hub at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Delta Air Lines Inc. plans to launch a nonstop flight between Hong Kong and Seattle next week. Meanwhile, United Continental Holdings Inc. Monday added a route from San Francisco to the central Chinese city of Chengdu.

In China, flag carrier Air China Ltd. on Tuesday launched nonstop flights between Beijing and Washington, D.C. A smaller rival, Haikou-based Hainan Airlines Co., which flies to Seattle, Chicago and Toronto, plans to launch a service between Beijing and Boston this month, followed by a route from Beijing to New Jersey's Newark Liberty International Airport later this year.

The moves reflect the consistent growth in the number of Chinese leisure travelers venturing abroad, despite China's economic slowdown. Gross-domestic-product growth in the world's second-largest economy slowed to 7.4% in the first quarter, its lowest level in 18 months.

American Airlines Vice President Erwan Perhirin said that forward-booking demand for the carrier's two new Dallas routes for the summer peak travel season is "very solid," with load factor—or the proportion of seats filled on each flight—staying above 80%.

The Hong Kong service is American Airlines' third new Asian route in the past 13 months, signaling the carrier's growing optimism toward air-travel demand there.

"We're investing heavily in the region," Mr. Perhirin said. He added that the airline will continue to seek growth opportunities, though he didn't elaborate.


However, analysts warned that a string of service launches could lead to overcapacity in the U.S. and China aviation markets, hurting airlines' profitability.

"The growth in the long-haul routes industry has come through chasing volume at the expense of yields, with airlines trying to gain market shares by offering discount tickets to travelers," said Eric Lin, an aviation analyst at UBS Securities.

Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. in late May warned investors that its January-April revenue was weaker than it had expected because of high fuel prices and poor yields—a measurement of an airline's profitability—partly because of promotional fares in March for new routes including Hong Kong-Newark and Hong Kong-Doha. The airline, based in Hong Kong, also plans to boost frequencies to Los Angeles and Chicago in the coming months.

Mr. Lin expects yields to remain under pressure, as capacity between China and the U.S. has risen 20% so far this year.

Instead of traditional gateways such as New York or Los Angeles, some of the new routes planned by U.S. and Chinese airlines would connect second-tier cities in both countries, with a primary focus on leisure travel, suggesting weaker ticket-pricing power amid intensifying competition, he added.

Even so, American Airlines Senior Vice President Suzanne Boda shrugged off concerns about possible overcapacity between the U.S. and China markets. "With the continuous expansion in China and continued growth of travel in China, it's really just keeping up with the demand," she said. "Therefore, I would say the pricing pressure is just not in there because we need the capacity."

Representatives at Delta and United didn't immediately reply to requests for comment.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

cfredo liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 13th, 2014, 03:13 PM   #4537
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Source : http://pic.feeyo.com/posts/607/6076190.html

__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

ovnours liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 19th, 2014, 12:15 PM   #4538
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Aircraft sex pests set to face civil action in courts
19 June 2014
South China Morning Post

Bill will make sexual harassment of a service provider illegal, even if it happens outside HK

Passengers who sexually harass staff on Hong Kong aircraft could soon feel the weight of local law after the government yesterday announced a bill to clamp down on mile-high sex pests.

Set to be introduced to the Legislative Council next Wednesday, the bill would make the sexual harassment of flight attendants a civil offence, with offenders liable to be brought before a court for financial damages.

The move by the government follows a survey by the Equal Opportunities Commission in February that found more than one quarter of flight attendants – both men and women – had been sexually harassed in the previous 12 months.

It also comes a little more than a month after Cathay Pacific flight attendants called on the company to redesign its uniforms, which cabin crew said were too revealing and could provoke sexual harassment.

If passed, the Sex Discrimination (Amendment) Bill 2014 would close a gap in existing regulations by making the sexual harassment of any service provider “unlawful”.

“Based on recommendations made by the Equal Opportunities Commission, we propose to render any sexual harassment by customers against providers or prospective providers of goods, facilities or services unlawful,” said a spokesperson for the Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Bureau, which is behind the bill.

Given the international nature of flight attendants’ work, the bill would also cover offences committed on a Hong Kongregistered ship or aircraft while outside Hong Kong, the bureau said.

Representatives from the aviation industry reacted positively to the news, with Cathay Pacific’s Flight Attendants Union hailing the extra legal protection.

“About 27 per cent of flight attendants were sexually harassed last year, while 47 per cent witnessed or heard about cases of sexual harassment,” union vice-chairman Julian Yau said, citing figures from the Equal Opportunities Commission study. “We’re very happy to see the government wants to fix the law to cover all service providers.”

Yau said he hoped the prospect of punishment would be a deterrent to would-be offenders.

“It is also good for other service providers, like waiters or waitresses,” he said. “They know they are protected.”
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2014, 04:37 AM   #4539
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Environmental report key to future of third runway
21 June 2014
South China Morning Post





Public must accept assessment on airport expansion, which green groups say will harm marine environment

The fate of Hong Kong’s costliest infrastructure project – a third airport runway – hinges on how well the public accepts the results of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) unveiled yesterday.

Adding another runway would boost the capacity of the airport by about 44 per cent by 2023 to meet expected growth in air traffic. The existing two runways are forecast to reach capacity in 2019, according to the Airport Authority.

But environmentalists worry the project, the city’s biggest since the construction of the airport in the mid-1990s, could spell disaster for the area’s marine ecology because 672 hectares of seabed will be reclaimed.

They say endangered Chinese white dolphins living in or using the affected habitats off Lantau will be threatened, despite a pledge by the Airport Authority to expand a marine park when work is complete.

The authority’s chairman, Vincent Lo Hong-sui, called the results of the two-year EIA study, which is now subject to public consultation, the “most comprehensive” ever conducted in Hong Kong.

“Hong Kong International Airport is strategically important to sustaining the [the city’s] development and economy,” he said. “This is why we are doing everything practicable to address the likely environmental impacts.”

No one from the authority had anything to say yesterday about the final price tag for the project, which was initially estimated at HK$136 billion but is expected to be tens of billions of dollars higher.

Tommy Leung King-yin, general manager for projects, said it was in the process of updating the cost, which would take into account all mitigation measures covered in the environmental impact report.

The airlines and logistics sector have thrown their weight behind the project, which they see as vital to maintaining the city’s status as a regional aviation hub. The airport is among the region’s busiest in terms of passenger and cargo throughput. The authority estimates the third runway (pictured on the right with a new terminal in an artist’s impression) could deliver HK$912 billion in economic benefits over 50 years. But green activists say the social and environmental costs, including carbon emissions, could also be in the hundreds of billions.

As well as the issue of the dolphins, the report addresses the project’s impact on air and water quality and noise pollution. It concludes they will be acceptable with mitigation measures. But green groups say the authority made assumptions favourable to the project in the assessment.

Public consultation on the report will be open until July 19, after which the head of the Environmental Protection Department will make a decision on the project, based on views submitted by the public and the Advisory Council on the Environment.

Environmentalists said while they had faith in the assessment system, they feared the advisory council was just a “rubber stamp”.

“There are conservationists and academics sitting on this council, but there are also many who are pro-government,” said Edwin Lau Che-feng, Friends of the Earth’s head of advocacy and an ex-council member.

Projects have rarely been rejected since the EIA Ordinance came into force in 1995.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2014, 01:09 PM   #4540
philip2903
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 2
Likes (Received): 0

Intermodal Transfer Terminal - ITT and T2 Design

http://issuu.com/uditgoel/docs/ucl_portfolio
philip2903 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
east asian hub airport, hong kong

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium