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View Poll Results: Scale from 1 to 10, 10 being SUPER and 1 being BAD, what would you rate the Airport??
1 3 3.57%
2 0 0%
3 0 0%
4 0 0%
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6 1 1.19%
7 7 8.33%
8 9 10.71%
9 28 33.33%
10 36 42.86%
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Old March 18th, 2015, 04:52 PM   #4701
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Hong Kong Airport Proposes Levy After Third Runway Approved

It seems that there are reasons for the skeptics to question the necessity of the 3rd runway.

The comments made by Mr. Lam Chiu-Ying, ex-Hong Kong Observatory chief, are particularly relevant.

And the reluctance on the Government to release details of the so-called agreement on ATC amongst thePearl River Delta civil avaiation bodies doesn't help to dismiss suspicsion.

A price tag of $100+ billion HKD for a runway just for landing .....

On the financing side, why only departing passengers have to pay the airport building fees and not those arriving or transiting, who are also airport users. Not at all fair.
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Old March 19th, 2015, 10:28 AM   #4702
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Old March 22nd, 2015, 06:05 PM   #4703
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The airport cost HK$156 billion, putting it among the world’s most expensive
22 March 2015
South China Morning Post

The airport cost HK$156 billion, putting it among the world’s most expensive airport construction projects.

October 1989: Hong Kong Governor Sir David Wilson announces plan to construct a new airport at Chek Lap Kok.

September 1991: The British and Chinese governments sign a memorandum of understanding in support of the airport project, setting expenditure at HK$98 billion.

June 1993: Hong Kong government announces need for a HK$135.6 million wind-shear warning system at Chek Lap Kok to alert pilots of wind or turbulence, after the shape of hills on Lantau Island are identified as causing risk of wind shear.

December 1993: Land reclamation works on the airport site reaches Lam Chau island.

1993 to 1994: Relations between British-ruled Hong Kong and Beijing deteriorate as the Chinese side refuses to take on post-handover debt, questioning why the colonial government did not use its surplus to fund the project.

January 1994: Beijing’s top official on Hong Kong affairs criticises Hong Kong government for seeking extra funds for airport projects without waiting for a Sino-British financial agreement. Beijing insists that financing follow the Memorandum of Understanding, which limits debt levels to HK$5 billion. Beijing insists the government’s surplus of more than HK$100 billion be used to fund the project.

June 1995: Land reclamation and excavation to form the 1,255-hectare airport site is completed.

1996: Around 4,000 imported labourers work on the project as it nears completion, well below the estimated 17,000 originally thought needed. There were about four local workers for every foreign worker. A pay dispute sees Thai workers down tools at the Kwai Chung Route 3 viaduct project on September 26, 1995.

May 6, 1998: First 12 removal trucks leave Kai Tak Airport to prepare for the move to Chek Lap Kok. In what is said to be the largest peace-time operation, more than 1,200 vehicles, 14 barges, 30 aircraft and 40,000 people move equipment on July 5, 1998. Around 10,000 vehicles, 70 barges and 30 aircraft are prepared for the relocation.

July 2, 1998: President Jiang Zemin opens the HK$156 billion Hong Kong International Airport.

July 6, 1998: Airport opens to public as Cathay Pacific flight CX889 from New York becomes the first commercial flight to land and CX907 to Manila becomes the first flight to depart.

July 1998: New airport is plagued by a series of teething problems as baggage goes astray, toilets fail to flush, Airport Express trains break down and cargo operations are forced to move back to Kai Tak.

December 27, 1998: Hong Kong International Airport sets record for number of passengers passing through it in one day as more than 100,000 people use the hub. More than 27 million passengers used the airport in 1998.

August 22, 1999: A China Airlines flight from Bangkok crashes on landing at Chek Lap Kok during a typhoon, killing two people. Passengers are trapped upside down in their seats for hours after the plane flips.

November 2003: Government planners introduce the Hong Kong 2030 Study to the legislature, calling for the first time for a third runway to be built at the airport on the grounds that it would reach capacity by 2020.

June 2007: Terminal 2 officially opens.
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Old March 23rd, 2015, 03:13 PM   #4704
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Public opinion turns against third runway, poll shows
23 March 2015
South China Morning Post Excerpt

The planned HK$141.5 billion third runway at Chek Lap Kok airport is facing strong opposition, according to a survey commissioned this month by green groups that arrived at very different findings from a government study held four years ago.

Two-thirds of Hongkongers polled now want the Airport Authority to focus on improving the operations of its two runways before considering building a third, the latest survey shows.

Back in 2011, the authority found in its study that 73 per cent of residents supported having a third runway. A green campaigner said that survey took into account views collected from the logistics industry, which would favour a new airstrip.

Plans for the new runway are mired in criticism, not least because of its multibillion-dollar budget. But the authority's chief executive, Fred Lam Tin-fuk, defended the high cost, saying the project was more than just an additional runway.

"It's almost like building an airport. There will be a new concourse, railway system and luggage system," Lam said on television yesterday.

The Executive Council approved the project last week in an attempt to boost the city's competitiveness.

However, public opinion is in favour of the authority enhancing the existing twin-runway system before contemplating a third airstrip, based on the latest Baptist University poll, which surveyed 617 people from March 10 to 18. Researchers found 68 per cent agreed or strongly agreed with this stance, with 31 per cent disagreeing or strongly disagreeing with it.

They also found 57 per cent agreed or strongly agreed that the government should wait for the outcome of a judicial review challenging the project's environmental impact assessment before progressing further. Asked if the government should become the authority's guarantor and allow the project to be financed in a way that bypassed Legislative Council oversight, 68 per cent disagreed or strongly disagreed.
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Old March 23rd, 2015, 03:30 PM   #4705
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Old March 23rd, 2015, 07:31 PM   #4706
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Jetstar jettisons HK planes
23 March 2015
The Australian Excerpt

Aviation: Jetstar Hong Kong says it remains confident it will still get permission to start flying despite the fact it has now sold eight aircraft from its start-up fleet of nine Airbus A320s.

The stalled Qantas Group joint venture had previously unloaded six planes from its start-up fleet and announced on Friday it had sold another two.

Jetstar Hong Kong chief executive Edward Lau said the two aircraft had been sold as part of “prudent management of costs” and he was still confident it would launch.

“The sale will not affect Jetstar Hong Kong’s readiness to launch and Jetstar Hong Kong has the flexibility to ensure we can grow our fleet after commencing operations,’’ Mr Lau said. “Jetstar Hong Kong continues to work towards regulatory approval, a process that is taking longer than initially expected.’’ The move leaves the joint venture between China Eastern, Jetstar and Shun Tak Holdings with one aircraft needed for tests for its air operators certificate out of a fleet of nine originally acquired for the start-up.

Regulatory approval has taken much longer than expected and has been strongly opposed by powerful incumbent Cathay Pacific, which argued it did not qualify as a Hong Kong carrier and would be controlled from Melbourne.

The airline was originally set up as a 50-50 joint venture with China Eastern, with each side contributing $US99 million to the start-up costs, but Shun Tak was added as an equity partner and the conglomerate’s high-profile managing director, Pansy Ho, was appointed chairman in an attempt counter the Cathay criticism. Shun Tak now has 51 per cent of the voting rights in the company and cost of its board and management are from Hong Kong.
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Old March 23rd, 2015, 09:52 PM   #4707
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Public opinion turns against third runway, poll shows
23 March 2015
South China Morning Post Excerpt

The planned HK$141.5 billion third runway at Chek Lap Kok airport is facing strong opposition, according to a survey commissioned this month by green groups that arrived at very different findings from a government study held four years ago.

Two-thirds of Hongkongers polled now want the Airport Authority to focus on improving the operations of its two runways before considering building a third, the latest survey shows.

Back in 2011, the authority found in its study that 73 per cent of residents supported having a third runway. A green campaigner said that survey took into account views collected from the logistics industry, which would favour a new airstrip.

Plans for the new runway are mired in criticism, not least because of its multibillion-dollar budget. But the authority's chief executive, Fred Lam Tin-fuk, defended the high cost, saying the project was more than just an additional runway.

"It's almost like building an airport. There will be a new concourse, railway system and luggage system," Lam said on television yesterday.

The Executive Council approved the project last week in an attempt to boost the city's competitiveness.

However, public opinion is in favour of the authority enhancing the existing twin-runway system before contemplating a third airstrip, based on the latest Baptist University poll, which surveyed 617 people from March 10 to 18. Researchers found 68 per cent agreed or strongly agreed with this stance, with 31 per cent disagreeing or strongly disagreeing with it.

They also found 57 per cent agreed or strongly agreed that the government should wait for the outcome of a judicial review challenging the project's environmental impact assessment before progressing further. Asked if the government should become the authority's guarantor and allow the project to be financed in a way that bypassed Legislative Council oversight, 68 per cent disagreed or strongly disagreed.
If you polled the same people king their views on Mainland shoppers in HK and they strongly opposed them would you then stop Mainlanders coming in?
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Old March 24th, 2015, 05:33 PM   #4708
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The government needs to value public opinion, which is currently shocked at the hefty price tag.
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Old March 24th, 2015, 09:08 PM   #4709
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
The government needs to value public opinion, which is currently shocked at the hefty price tag.
Nice idea

Talking about the government which one are you referring to?

If you are talking about the central government if they valued public opinion so much why are they opposed to genuine universal suffrage?

The answer is that they perfer to make major policy decisions that serve the interests of powerful business interests.

This will not be an exception to that rule no matter how polls are held.

The real issue is whether the third runway serves the public interest as well not if all the public agree with it.

Last edited by kunming tiger; March 24th, 2015 at 09:13 PM.
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Old March 25th, 2015, 07:12 AM   #4710
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kunming tiger View Post
Nice idea

Talking about the government which one are you referring to?

If you are talking about the central government if they valued public opinion so much why are they opposed to genuine universal suffrage?

The answer is that they perfer to make major policy decisions that serve the interests of powerful business interests.

This will not be an exception to that rule no matter how polls are held.

The real issue is whether the third runway serves the public interest as well not if all the public agree with it.
Don't confuse the runway project with the universal suffrage issue. They are 2 different things. If public opinion is not respected in any issue, citizens have a right to request judicial reviews and due process - something mainland Chinese don't get to enjoy across the border. Clearly, HK society has progressed and matured to not just consider business interests alone.
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Old March 25th, 2015, 09:02 PM   #4711
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Don't confuse the runway project with the universal suffrage issue. They are 2 different things. If public opinion is not respected in any issue, citizens have a right to request judicial reviews and due process - something mainland Chinese don't get to enjoy across the border. Clearly, HK society has progressed and matured to not just consider business interests alone.

That remains to be seen whether their due process is worth the paper it's written on .

My best guess is this project like the Hk Macau Zhu Hai bridge WKCD and West Kowllon HSR will go ahead regardless of public opinion or objections.

You are of course about not confusing the third runway with the issue of universal suffrage. One is far more impotant than the other.

In theory with universal suffrage

elected representatives are there to represent the public interest enact or revoke laws to that end,

a division of powers , checks and balances and ultimately accountability at the ballot box.

reality is somewhat more complicated.

I don't believe it's possible to have a westminister system of government minus universal suffrage.

To put it bluntly due process HK style was commercial in its application , protect parties to a contract allow redress for breach of contract unfair restraint of trade and so on.

Business interests made HK what it is today .
.

The central government will tolerate the leadership in HK as long as they can get things done.

Failure to deliver is not an option.
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Old March 26th, 2015, 07:08 PM   #4712
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kunming tiger View Post
That remains to be seen whether their due process is worth the paper it's written on .

My best guess is this project like the Hk Macau Zhu Hai bridge WKCD and West Kowllon HSR will go ahead regardless of public opinion or objections.

You are of course about not confusing the third runway with the issue of universal suffrage. One is far more impotant than the other.
Luckily, Hong Kong is not like China to pursue the maximum profit at all costs and shunning people by the side. We have progressed to today's prosperity and now regard people's rights, concerns, and access to the rule of law highly.
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Old March 26th, 2015, 08:24 PM   #4713
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Old March 30th, 2015, 01:41 AM   #4714
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I guess the main problem of the airport shall be shortage of terminals, it's super crowded inside
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Old March 30th, 2015, 03:10 PM   #4715
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Hactl charts new course as e-commerce takes off
28 March 2015
South China Morning Post Excerpt

HK air cargo handler fends off challenges from rivals as it adapts to the transformation of the logistics chain brought about by rise in e-selling

Hong Kong Air Cargo Terminal Limited (Hactl) is the largest ground handler at the world’s busiest cargo airport, but chief executive Mark Whitehead has good reasons to worry about it losing that position, with the new Cathay Pacific Cargo Terminal vying for traffic and Shanghai threatening to top Hong Kong in tonnage.

Hong Kong International Airport set a new throughput tonnage record of 4.38 million tonnes last year – with Hactl contributing 1.81 million tonnes and Cathay 1.45 million tonnes, but Shanghai, the Asia-Pacific region’s second-biggest hub, is quickly closing the gap, reporting throughput of 3.6 million tonnes last year.

“There is nothing I can do about it,” Whitehead said. “It is inevitable that more cargo in the mainland will get shipped out directly as there are more direct flights.”

If the burden of financing Hong Kong’s HK$141.5 billion third runway was passed on to users of the airport, as is being proposed, Hong Kong would risk losing even more traffic, countering the point of the investment, he said. “When the cost compared to competitor hubs is too high then we would lose business,” he said. “Airlines and freight forwarders will find alternative growth areas … they are not tied to Hong Kong. Hong Kong’s cost competitive edge has to be constantly refurbished.”

International Air Transport Association chief Tony Tyler said on a recent visit to the city that a 10 per cent increase in user charges could reduce passenger numbers by 80,000 and cargo by 7,000 tonnes.

Whitehead said Hong Kong still had advantages as a hub because of its network, frequency, fast and easy customs procedures, and leadership in adoption of paperless processing. When shippers chose between cargo routing options, it was “a balance between time-efficiency and cost”, he said.

The US$63 billion global air cargo industry, and Chinese air hubs in particular, are facing fresh opportunities and challenges brought by the rise of cross-border e-commerce, Whitehead said.

“The ability of e-tailers to sell globally, instead of just on their own high street, means we could see a lot of new international traffic in the air as bulk stocks of high-value items move from manufacturers to new regional distribution centres in distant markets,” he said, while postal service is making a comeback around the world because its network was suited for scattered shipments.

Not only was that transforming the logistics chain but it was also making security a crucial issue, especially for ground handlers that do security screening for their airline customers.

“We are the last line of defence,” Whitehead said. Unlike in mainland China, where X-ray scanning is almost 100 per cent, much less screening is required by Hong Kong’s customs and civil aviation departments.

Cargo tends to come in pre-packaged by freight forwarders, which speeds up the process, but that leaves the cargo terminal with the burden of minesweeping for undeclared hazardous goods before they are loaded on to planes.

He said Hactl had extensive facilities geared towards “finding the one lithium battery”, but if the mandatory screening rate was to be raised – a trend in the European Union and the US – it would inevitably add to handling time and costs.

“With the significant attractions of Hong Kong as a gateway for China, the only thing that is missing is cost-effective inland distribution – and that is what we are currently working on,” Whitehead said. Hactl was providing new bulk, inbound freight channels for customers e-selling into the mainland through its logistics subsidiary Hacis, which links air and road by offering bonded trucking services between Hong Kong and southern provinces.

Hacis managing director Vivien Lau said traffic had been growing at double-digit rates, though the volume was still only around a tenth of Hactl’s total.

“A notable change in the past few years is from a unidirectional flow of northbound traffic to a more balanced one,” she said, as Hong Kong was no longer the only hub through which cargo carriers served China. Every day 10 to 15, and sometimes up to 40 Hacis trucks, travelled between Hong Kong’s airport and its six warehouses on the mainland.
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Old April 1st, 2015, 02:35 PM   #4716
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[IMG]http://i57.************/1zoktq0.jpg[/IMG]
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Old April 8th, 2015, 01:36 PM   #4717
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Old April 10th, 2015, 06:15 PM   #4718
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Why is Jetstar so keen to become a Hong Kong airline?
Answer may be that designation as local carrier delivers the right to sit alongside the government in sensitive and strategic air traffic negotiations
9 April 2015
South China Morning Post Excerpt

For more than two years I have been baffled by the do-whatever-it-takes efforts of Qantas affiliate Jetstar Airlines to become a Hong Kong local airline.

As the proceedings of the Air Traffic Licensing Authority (ATLA) drag on in Exchange Square's Hong Kong Arbitration Centre, the airline is haemorrhaging millions of dollars on aircraft it can't fly, air crew who can only train and drink coffee, office space few of us can afford, and aviation executives who have nothing better to do than minimise the haemorrhaging.

Whatever the ATLA ruling, no matter who "wins" or "loses", there will definitely be judicial proceedings which will take a further six months or more. And beyond that, the Hong Kong government must also rule on whether Jetstar can be allowed to become a "local" carrier.

Sensitivities were tweaked further last week with the discovery that Singapore Airlines is looking to take a minority stake in Hong Kong Airlines - the local operator controlled by Hainan Airlines. The Hong Kong government now has not just one but two potential Trojan horses to think about. And Singapore Airlines constitutes a much more direct threat to Hong Kong's control of its own hub than Qantas ever will.

What is the prize that so powerfully motivates Jetstar - or its bankrollers, Qantas, China Eastern and Shun Tak - to bleed so heavily and for so long? For low-cost carriers like Jetstar, Hong Kong can offer only lean pickings. Competition is ferocious on almost all routes. Access to landing and take-off slots is a nightmare at any reasonable time of day. As a fast-turnaround, low-cost carrier, Jetstar will have no capacity to capture cargo revenues, which so bolster the earnings of full-service competitors. Access to mainland cities (the holy grail for future airlines perhaps) is fraught with delays that take a savage toll on cost control.

In Asia as a whole, just AirAsia out of almost 20 low-cost carriers has in recent years reliably made money. Jetstar's sister airlines in Japan, Vietnam and Singapore all appear to be struggling to keep their heads above water. And as the sorry plight of the now-bankrupt Oasis Airlines reminds us, the ferocious competition through the Hong Kong hub makes it one of the toughest in the world through which to earn money.

So where is the logic to make all this pain worthwhile? Having sat through the tedium of the ATLA arbitration drama, with Jetstar and its Qantas lawyers pitching barristers against the arrayed objections of Cathay Pacific, Hongkong Express and Hong Kong Airlines, there seems only one thing: the right to sit alongside the Hong Kong government in its many air traffic negotiations, with the government negotiating on its behalf for air traffic rights to international destinations in Asia and further afield.

As an observer in Hong Kong negotiations, Jetstar would be privy to confidential and often highly sensitive strategic information on the priorities and objectives of Hong Kong negotiators.

There seems nothing else that designation as a local carrier delivers. The crux is the information gleaned from being inside the Hong Kong negotiating team. And here, for me, is the most troubling issue. Despite huge efforts to comply with the Basic Law's "Principle Place of Business" requirement, including bringing in China Eastern and Shun Tak Holdings to get Qantas shareholdings down to a minority, there are still members of the Jetstar board who would be privy to all of the Hong Kong government's air traffic negotiation plans.

Does that matter? Perhaps not so severely with a troubled airline like Qantas. But as of last week it now seems we have Singapore Airlines preparing to enter the fray. And my guess is that ferocious Middle Eastern competitors like Etihad in Abu Dhabi and Emirates in Dubai will not be far behind. I wonder how we should feel about Emirates, or Singapore Airlines, or Qantas in effect sitting on both sides of the negotiating table as Hong Kong negotiates its air traffic rights.
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Old April 11th, 2015, 09:51 AM   #4719
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South China Morning Post Excerpt
High-speed rail to mainland China won’t curb demand for Hong Kong airport third runway, officials say
Airport Authority rejects concerns of town planners that Guangzhou link will be more convenient and divert travellers from Chek Lap Kok
PUBLISHED : Friday, 10 April, 2015

Hong Kong Airport Authority officials have dismissed Town Planning Board members’ concerns that a high-speed rail link from the city to mainland China would divert passengers’ demand for a third runway at Chek Lap Kok airport.

Officials briefed board members this morning on the HK$140 billion three-runway system after the Executive Council gave the green light for construction last month. They insisted that an extra runway was crucial in maintaining Hong Kong’s competitiveness.

Wilson Fung Wing-yip, the authority’s executive director of corporate development, rejected criticisms that a lot of resources were used to serve mainland China-bound flights, saying they accounted for only 23 per cent to 24 per cent of total passenger flight movements.

However, board vice-chairman Stanley Wong Yuen-fai said the figures were still a significant proportion of flights, questioning whether the completion of the high-speed rail link would divert passengers to rail.

“When the high-speed rail is completed, my estimation, and according to documents presented to us previously, is that many Hongkongers and mainlanders would use rail,” he said.

Another board member, Dr Lawrence Poon Wing-cheung, had a similar query. “Some might use high-speed rail to come to Hong Kong because it is more convenient,” he said.

But Fung said high-speed rail would have little impact on flight demand. He explained that only rail destinations within a six-hour journey would be able to compete with air travel, but that accounted for only around 5 per cent of mainland China-bound flights.

“We have also studied [the situation] in France and Japan ... some mainlanders might want to make use of Hong Kong airport which can connect them to the world,” Fung said. “We don’t think high-speed rail would cause a significant impact to us.”

The high-speed rail link from Hong Kong to Guangzhou is scheduled for completion in 2017 – two years late and HK$6 billion over its initial HK$65 billion budget.
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Old April 18th, 2015, 05:45 AM   #4720
hkskyline
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Jetstar Pacific to start Hanoi-Hong Kong service in Sept
17 April 2015
The Saigon Times Daily Excerpt

HCMC - Jetstar Pacific Airlines announced yesterday that it will commence Hanoi-Hong Kong service on September 7 to meet growing demand for air travel between the two places.

The low-cost carrier will use its 180-seat A320 aircraft to operate four weekly return flights between Noi Bai and Hong Kong international airports on Mondays, Tuesdays, Saturdays and Sundays. The total flying time is around two hours.

Le Hong Ha, chief executive officer of Jetstar Pacific, said in a statement that the airline opens the new international route to serve passengers traveling between Vietnam and Hong Kong.

“This new route will support the growing demand for low fares of passengers who want to visit relatives and even business travelers, and will give a boost to tourism,” Ha said.
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