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View Poll Results: Scale from 1 to 10, 10 being SUPER and 1 being BAD, what would you rate the Airport??
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Old December 19th, 2004, 01:34 PM   #621
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POUND THE ALARM!!!
 
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Is Air Canada and United Airlines having a new Paint Scheme?
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Old December 19th, 2004, 05:57 PM   #622
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Yes, AC's new scheme emerged following its restructuring, but very few planes have this livery. United also has a new scheme as well.

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Old December 19th, 2004, 06:15 PM   #623
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Enchanting musical recital to celebrate Christmas



(Hong Kong, 19 December 2004) — Internationally acclaimed musician Mr Trey Lee will lead a group of 200 young cellists from Shenzhen and Hong Kong to perform their musical talents at Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) this Thursday. Their performance of classical and Christmas music will enrich the airport with cultural ambience and spread the joys of the festive season to passengers.

Professor Chan Wing Wah, Chairman of the Music Department of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, is invited as the conductor of the performance. Famous pop singer Miss Joey Yung will sing together with a choir of young performers.

Mr Trey Lee is the first Hong Kong-born musician who won the first prize at the prestigious International Antonio Janigro Cello Competition in Croatia in February 2004. Mr Lee’s musician flair also won him appointments as Solo Cellist of the Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra and the Netherlands Chamber Orchestra.

HKIA is a place where international passengers get their first impression of Hong Kong. Apart from using the modern facilities of the airport, arriving passengers enjoying the enchanting musical performance will also be getting closely in touch with the cultural side of Hong Kong.

“With 200 musicians performing delightful classical and Christmas songs at the airport, the coming performance will be the largest of its kind ever organised at the airport,” Mr Eric Wong, Airport Authority (AA) General Manager, Terminal, said at today’s pre-event press conference.

Jointly organized by the AA, Radio Television Hong Kong and Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups, “HKIA 2004 Grand Christmas Cello Ensemble” will be held on 23 December (Thursday) from 6:00 to 6:30pm at the Meeters and Greeters Hall of HKIA’s passenger terminal. Those who can’t join the performance can watch the show broadcast on TVB Jade Channel the same day at 7:00pm.
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Old December 19th, 2004, 10:44 PM   #624
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Reit fiasco clouds airport privatisation
Link debacle sounds alarm for government plans but officials still confident about Chek Lap Kok
Joseph Lo
20 December 2004
South China Morning Post

The legal challenge that shelved the Housing Authority's Link Reit, or real estate investment trust, has cast a long shadow over the government's larger privatisation programme.

However, according to a senior public official, the fiasco centred on 151 grubby commercial retail outlets and 79,000 parking spaces has not dissuaded the government from privatising one of its crown jewels - Hong Kong International Airport.

"We will watch [the Link proceedings] carefully and see how they develop," Sandra Lee Suk-yee, permanent secretary for economic development and labour, said in an interview with the South China Morning Post.

"We've heard people say they agree with privatisation although, admittedly, most people say they [have reservations]. We have not heard anyone advocating an alternative route to privatisation."

A public consultation on the Airport Authority's proposed privatisation was initiated last month and is due to continue until mid-February.

But what was a benign political environment at the consultation's outset has turned tempestuous, after the humble court challenge of a 67-year-old semi-literate public housing tenant, Lo Siu-lan, upended the best-laid plans of the chief executive's administration, its investment bankers and legal advisers.

The Housing Authority's right to sell its retail and parking assets has so far been upheld by the courts at every turn. Ms Lo's challenge, however, exposed an insufficient legal framework for the privatisation of public assets and a government consultation process that - in the case of the Housing Authority - was at best opaque and at worst incompetent.

With the possibility that Ms Lo would appeal the lower court rulings, the Housing Authority late last night announced that it was pulling this morning's $21.3 billion Link IPO, which would have ranked as the world's largest reit.

Consultation meetings over the airport's privatisation have so far been held with the Board of Airline Representatives - which includes the airlines which operate at Chek Lap Kok - and with airport concessionaires and franchisees, employees, staff unions and academics.

The government has also met with the Aviation Advisory Board which encompasses representatives from the wider trading community of shippers and freight forwarders.

"It's hard to talk to consumers directly, so we've tried, rather, to talk to a cross section of the public," Ms Lee said.

According to Ms Lee, the most contentious issue to emerge from the consultation was the design of an aviation charging mechanism that is deemed fair by all stakeholders.

"I can see this as being the most contentious issue for everyone. How do we determine a rate of return for the airport?" Ms Lee said, adding that a solution hinged in part on independent talks already under way between airlines and the airport. "It really depends on a charging mechanism to be worked out between the AA and its users."

This hinges on a clear distinction of the airport's aviation and non-aviation revenues, how prices should be regulated and a consensus on the airport's future growth potential.

"These are the parameters for the AA to do their books," Ms Lee said. "What is aviation revenue and what is revenue from franchisees and concessionaires? They have to determine what goes into the mix.

"They also have to agree on traffic forecasts and growth forecasts for the airport going forward, as these things will also affect the future charging process. These are the kinds of details that are being discussed," she added.

"Who drives growth, the airlines or the commercial franchisees? It's very difficult to draw the line, but we also want to avoid excessive cross-subsidies."

According to Airport Authority finance director Raymond Lai Wing-cheung, if the airport were listed today it would easily be valued at at least $40 billion - or about 30 per cent more than the $30 billion that the government still has locked up in Chek Lap Kok.

"That is my own personal speculation," he said. "Most airports are lucky if they can get book value, but I believe Hong Kong will be able to get more." Mr Lai's estimate does not include the $6.38 billion that the government will receive from the authority this year, in the form of a $6 billion capital restructuring and a $380 million first-time dividend.

While a $10 billion paper profit on its $30 billion investment sounds attractive, by the time the listing goes ahead in 2006 it will represent only a 3.66 per cent compound annual rate of return since Chek Lap Kok opened in 1998.

Moreover, applying the $380 million dividend as a capital gain against the additional $6 billion returned this year yields just a 1 per cent annual return since 1998.

Notwithstanding such financial engineering, the authority will need a valuation in excess of $50 billion for the total return on its original $36 billion investment to beat a benchmark long-term rate offered by long-term US government bonds. That would help it to achieve a 5 per cent average rate of return per year.

However, Mr Lai maintained that a $40 billion valuation would be a positive figure for the first tranche of Airport Authority shares to be sold.

"You have to remember that this privatisation will only be a partial privatisation exercise," he said. "When the MTRC [Mass Transit Rail Corp] listed its first tranche of shares on the stock market, the valuation was at below book value."

Howard Lee Tat-chi, principal assistant secretary for economic development, said that the difficulty of arriving at a fair return for the Airport Authority was reflected in its recently published public consultation paper.

"In the paper, we intentionally left out numbers because we just wanted to talk about what mechanisms should be in place first," Mr Lee said. "Numbers are just a snapshot of any one year, rather than what should be the case going forward."

Profit issues aside, Mr Lee added that a privatised Airport Authority was also preferable because it would have more fund-raising flexibility. Up to now, the authority has relied on debt issuance to raise capital.

"That's good because interest rates are low now," he said. "But if rates rise significantly, being a listed company would allow it to tap the capital markets."

Zhang Anming, director of the Centre for Transportation Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, warned that a strong regulatory framework for a privatised Airport Authority will be a critical aspect of maintaining Chek Lap Kok as a driver of economic growth for the community.

"Airport charges of an unregulated profit-maximising airport are higher than those of public airports {hellip} even after taking into account concession effects," Mr Zhang said.

"Commercial freedom given to management is important, but not necessarily ownership type."

Studies had shown, he added, that "there is no clear evidence of a positive link between privatisation and productivity" at airports.

"It is true that the Airport Authority is already run under prudent commercial principles," Ms Lee acknowledged. "But we think that as a publicly listed company, it will allow for greater public participation and transparency in its running.

"The airport business is no longer just about bringing in planes. It needs a lot of packaging and work with outside partners, such as other airports and other aviation entities, for more business freedom and flexibility. Alliance-forming is very crucial these days. We want to release it, and let it go on its own to do these things, rather than for it to have to go through Legco each time it wanted to do something new."

At issue, she said, were fundamental questions about the government, its economic role and method of operation.

"The question is, do you want more government interference or less?" Ms Lee asked. "We're embracing transparency. If we put an umbrella regulation in place, then everyone will know how the AA must operate under it.

"We will install safeguards, but only to regulate where public interest is at stake. It's a balancing act because once it is a listed company, there are lots of things that we can't interfere in. As such, the charging mechanism becomes essential. And we want to include more consensus-building into the airport's development, rather than adversarial-type discussions."

As an example, Ms Lee said that early on in the British Airports Authority's (BAA) privatisation model, government regulation was "very heavy-handed".

"But now they've realised the need for a much more consensus-driven approach," she added. "Of course, they've had a much different history than Hong Kong. The BAA was run by bureaucrats before, and brought the private sector in to turn it around."
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Old December 20th, 2004, 03:24 PM   #625
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Old December 20th, 2004, 06:23 PM   #626
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Councillors attack heliport plan
Winnie Yeung
20 December 2004
South China Morning Post

Legislators, district councillors and residents yesterday poured scorn on a government proposal to build a permanent heliport in Western.

A forum held by district councillors, including Kam Nai-wai and Lai Kwok-hung, provided the first opportunity for residents to speak out. Many complained that the heliport would disturb their peace.

Waterfront residents are already forced to put up with the sound of helicopters flying by, to or from a heliport on the roof of the Shun Tak Centre in Sheung Wan.

The government plans to build a 4,400-square-metre heliport on the Sheung Wan waterfront, next to the Sun Yat Sen Memorial Park - the district's only large-scale recreational area.

According to a government paper submitted to Legco, the heliport would handle a maximum of 118 flights a day.

Darryl Chan Wai-man, of the Economic Development and Labour Bureau, said noise reduction measures would be taken if plans to build the heliport went ahead.

"And actually, it would be built behind the four-storey Western Parks Sports Centre, which is already an existing noise barrier," he said.

However, Mr Lai branded Mr Chan's argument as ridiculous.

"What would members of the sports centre say about this?" he asked.

Mr Kam questioned why the government was planning to move a temporary heliport for domestic flights from West Kowloon.

"Is it because it would be too noisy for the West Kowloon cultural hub, so you have to move it away? But it doesn't matter if it'd be too noisy for Western residents?" he said.
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Old December 21st, 2004, 04:00 AM   #627
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Aviation Daily
December 16, 2004 Thursday
HKIA To Continue Incentive Offer For New Airlines
William Dennis

The Hong Kong Airport Authority (HKAA) will extend through next year the New Destination Incentive Agreement for Hong Kong International Airport as a way to remain competitive with other airports in the region.

The was reintroduced in September, offers new and existing airlines operating to new destinations from Hong Kong a 50% rebate on landing charges in the first year of operation and 25% in the second year.

The plan was first introduced in May 2003 during the industry slump resulting from the SARS pneumonia outbreak with the hope of stimulating travel.

The plan's extension is seen as a means to keep the airport competitive, a contest that HKIA Chairman Victor Fung says has never been so intense. "The number of new airports and new terminals, which are on the rise in China, are excellent and will continue to show rapid progress...Our quality of service will give us the edge," he said.

Noting that factors such as frequency of flights, connectivity, operational efficiency, efficiency of customs clearance, services and cost determine an airport's competitiveness, Fung argued that his airport was the most comprehensive in those areas. "With extensive air services and a market-driven freight sector, the total through costs of air freight using HKIA are comparable with those of mainland airports but with a much higher level of service delivery. HKIA provides a total solution that encompasses the factors of time, reliability, security and cost," he said. -WD
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Old December 21st, 2004, 04:22 AM   #628
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^why don't they just build it atop a BUILDING IN HK????
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Old December 21st, 2004, 03:51 PM   #629
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By Anthony Cheng @ HKADB :









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Old December 21st, 2004, 08:48 PM   #630
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Co-operation pledge over cocaine trade
More intelligence will be shared with South America

Clifford Lo and Benjamin Wong
18 December 2004
South China Morning Post

Hong Kong authorities are to step up co-operation with South American counterparts as the popularity of cocaine continues to rise. About 60kg of the drug has been seized so far this year, a ninefold increase on last year.

Customs officers have enhanced inspection at Chek Lap Kok airport, as most powdered cocaine seized by law enforcers is brought in by drug couriers.

Besides being smuggled directly, the Narcotics Bureau has also found drug syndicates setting up storage centres on the mainland to smuggle cocaine into Hong Kong in instalments.

Cocaine has become more popular, according to Ben Leung Lun-cheung, head of the customs department's drug investigation bureau. He said one factor behind the trend was that the price of cocaine had dropped to as low as $635 a gram.

The average street price had fallen by a third in the year to October, to about $900 a gram.

"Demand for the drug is growing but its street price is decreasing. This reflects that there is probably a huge supply," Mr Leung said.

Officers said cocaine abuse in Hong Kong was previously limited to the wealthy. But more young people were now making the switch from drugs like Ecstasy and ketamine, they said.

Chief Superintendent Kenny Ip Lau-chuen, head of the Narcotics Bureau, said the popularity of cocaine was boosted by the poor quality of Ecstasy and ketamine.

He said pushers were forced to mix them with other chemicals because supplies had dwindled after a series of raids by Hong Kong and mainland authorities.

Mr Ip added the police would launch more operations against the cocaine trade in the coming year. Customs also said stopping cocaine being smuggled into Hong Kong from South America had become one of their priorities.

"To stop the trade, we will step up co-operation with South American countries like Peru and Colombia and increase exchange of intelligence," Mr Leung said.

More officers have also been deployed to the airport to step up inspections. X-ray equipment and ion-scanners are being used.

The drug traffickers usually come to Hong Kong from South America via Europe.

They hide the drugs in concealed compartments in their luggage or on their bodies.

Police say some smugglers from West Africa will risk their lives for as little as $3,100 by swallowing condoms filled with the drug.
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Old December 22nd, 2004, 05:02 AM   #631
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We'll fly safe on airport sale, says chastened government
Emily Tang, Hong Kong Standard
December 22, 2004

The government is more cautious about privatising public assets after the Link Real Estate Investment Trust (Reit) fiasco.

Secretary for Economic Development and Labour Stephen Ip said on Tuesday the government has set no firm date for the privatisation of the Airport Authority.

Even before Monday's failed Link listing, any airport move was not expected before 2006.

"There is no concrete timetable for the privatisation," Ip said in a radio interview. He also pledged public assets will not be sold cheaply.

"Regardless of the Link Reit dispute, we will still deal with airport privatisation carefully," Ip said.

"The airport is our most important asset. We will not sell our assets cheaply."

But just how much the airport assets will fetch will be decided by the market, and not government wishful thinking.

The authority's assets of more than HK$50 billion last year returned a weak profit of just HK$386 million.

The figure does not include the HK$6 billion loan the authority took out to pay for a "return of equity" to the government.

This loan, which has doubled the authority's debt, will go straight into government coffers to help balance its deficit. It will produce no income at all for the authority but will be an additional debt for future shareholders.

Another complication will be the make-up of the company that will run the airport if it goes public.

The government will need to balance how much control it needs to retain on issues such as airport security while allowing the company sufficient leeway to operate as a commercial concern.

The government is now consulting airlines and other parties. One of the main topics on the agenda is how airport user charges will be decided after privatisation.

Whether or not the market believes the authority's small return on assets will be worth HK$40 billion, as stated by its financial director Raymond Lai last week, remains to be seen.

If the market decides the airport is worth considerably less than the original taxpayer-funded investment, then any privatisation will almost certainly attract Link-like objections.

For example, it might be argued that a decision to sell the assets cheaply might not be "operating according to prudent commercial principles" as stipulated by the ordinance governing the Airport Authority.

A public consultation on the airport privatisation ends on February 31.
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Old December 22nd, 2004, 07:33 PM   #632
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Israel Business Arena
December 20, 2004
El Al Will Fly Cargo on Hong Kong- Luxembourg Route
David Hayoun

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs today announced that following Minister of Foreign Affairs Silvan Shalom's request to the Hong Kong government, El Al Israel Airlines (TASE:ELAL) will be allowed to operate a weekly cargo flight from Hong Kong to Europe.

Until now, El Al was only allowed to fly cargo from Tel Aviv to Hong Kong. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs said El Al would now be allowed to fly one cargo flight a week to Luxembourg. This will be the first time that El Al will fly cargo from Hong Kong to Europe without landing in Israel.

For El Al, the follow-on cargo flights will significantly increase the airline's revenue from cargo.

El Al CEO Amos Shapira recently said that El Al had a clear strategy to expand its share of the international air cargo market.

Published by Globes, Israel business news - www.globes.co.il - on December 20, 2004
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Old December 22nd, 2004, 07:37 PM   #633
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Old December 23rd, 2004, 07:02 AM   #634
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VIM Airlines B757-200 RA-73016


UPS B767-300 N330UP


Jetstar Asia A320 9V-VQZ
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Old December 23rd, 2004, 10:40 AM   #635
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Old December 23rd, 2004, 01:13 PM   #636
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read this:
http://www.hongkongairport.com/eng/a...pdf/MP2020.pdf

Is this document saying that the current airport terminal alone can handle up to 61 million passengers after some terminal enhancement (not expansion) and can handle up to 87 million passengers after some expansions of the current arrival/departure hall?

So does that mean that after the completion of the 2nd terminal, HKIA will be able to handle more than 87 million passengers?
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Old December 23rd, 2004, 08:05 PM   #637
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World-class cellist celebrates Christmas at HKIA

(Hong Kong, 23 December 2004) - International passengers and the local TV audience were treated to world-class music performed today at Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA).


From left to right:
Professor Chan Wing Wah of CUHK, Mr Trey Lee, Mr Wilson Fung, Deputy Secretary for Economic Development, Dr Rosanna Wong, Executive director of HKFYG, Dr David J Pang, AA CEO, Mr Andrew Ma, President of HKFYG, Mr Cheung Man-sun, Assistant Director (PATV), Miss Joey Yung and Mr Howard Eng, AA Airport Management Director.



World renowned cellist Mr Trey Lee performs a series of Christmas music together with some 200 young and aspiring cellists from Hong Kong and Shenzhen.

Mr Trey Lee, the first Chinese musician to win the prestigious International Antonio Janigro Cello Competition in Croatia, led the performance with some 200 young and aspiring cellists from Hong Kong and Shenzhen.

Canto-pop singer Miss Joey Yung sang a number of popular Christmas carols to the cello accompaniment. Professor Chan Wing Wah of the Chinese University of Hong Kong was the conductor of the performance.

Airport Authority Hong Kong (AA)'s Chief Executive Officer Dr David J Pang said, "To make the holiday season even brighter, we have brought Christmas spirit to the airport and we are delighted to have a world-class musician performing at our world-class airport."

The show, jointly organised by the AA, Radio Television Hong Kong (RTHK) and Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups, was broadcast on channel 4 of RTHK’s radio service as well as televised on TVB Jade Channel the same evening.
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Old December 23rd, 2004, 08:06 PM   #638
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Old December 24th, 2004, 09:44 AM   #639
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HIGH TIMES FOR HONG KONG'S AIRPORT
A public offering could help it fend off competition from mainland rivals
By Simon Cartledge in Hong Kong
27 December 2004
BusinessWeek

Opening day at Hong Kong International Airport six years ago was a fiasco. Despite the facility's $4.6 billion price tag, baggage went missing, elevators stalled, and foul smells wafted from the bathrooms. Worse, within 24 hours the freight handling system collapsed, and cargo operations had to be shifted back to the old airport for six weeks. Today, though, all that is just a bad memory as the new airport's fortunes are taking off. Passenger traffic stands at a record high, cargo volume jumped 19% this year, and profits hit $63 million in 2003.

IPO IN THE OFFING

Now, city officials want to cash in on that success by floating the airport's shares. Although no details have been set, the government in November began a three-month consultation period on the issue. A sale of 25% of the airport's stock, the amount analysts say is being discussed, could raise $1 billion or more. That would help offset the $5.5 billion deficit the city is expected to amass this year, though officials deny that raising money is their goal. "The main benefit of the proposed privatization would be to subject the airport to even stronger market and commercial discipline," says Howard Lee, an assistant secretary in Hong Kong's Economic Services Bureau.

That newfound discipline might come in handy as the airport faces growing competition from the mainland. In August, Guangzhou's $2.4 billion Baiyun International Airport opened just 110 miles to the north. It could become a major cargo hub for the legions of manufacturers in the Pearl River Delta. And Shanghai's Pudong Airport is trying to establish itself as China's primary passenger gateway. Even closer, Shenzhen airport is mounting a challenge for freight, while Macau is emerging as a favored center for budget airlines. In a study this year for Hong Kong's Airport Authority, consultant GHK forecast that while Hong Kong airport's cargo volume will nearly double by 2020, its share of the Delta's total will slide from 90% to less than half. Hong Kong will have to make do with "taking a smaller share of a larger pie," says GHK Managing Director Jonathan Beard.

The challenge for Hong Kong is keeping its neighbors from eating too much pie. Hong Kong already has some strategies in place. Ferry services now feed cargo and passengers to the airport from mainland cities. And Hong Kong officials are negotiating to acquire stakes in the Shenzhen and Zhuhai airports to strengthen their hand in China. Hong Kong's airport has come a long way in six years. Making it a private company may give it the edge it needs.
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Old December 24th, 2004, 06:01 PM   #640
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J.D. Power and Associates Reports:
Most Passengers Do Not Take Advantage of
Express Check-In Options at the Airport


Hong Kong, Singapore, Calgary and San Antonio Airports
Rank Highest in Passenger Satisfaction in Their Respective Segments


December 6, 2004

WESTLAKE VILLAGE, Calif.—Although checking in for a flight at the airline’s main counter takes significantly longer than curbside service or self-service kiosks, less than one-quarter of passengers take advantage of either of these express check-in options, according to the J.D. Power and Associates 2004 Global Airport Satisfaction Index StudySM released today.

The study, now in its fifth year, measures airport satisfaction in three segments: large (30 million or more passengers per year), medium (10 million to less than 30 million passengers per year) and small (less than 10 million passengers per year).

While overall satisfaction is higher among passengers who check in at curbside, online and at self check-in kiosks, a majority (59%) of passengers check in at the main counter, which takes an average of 19 minutes. Just 18 percent use a self check-in kiosk, which averages 8 minutes, while 10 percent check in at curbside, which averages 13 minutes. While many airlines now allow passengers to obtain their boarding pass through the Internet, currently only 5 percent of passengers use this option.

"Time is a prime commodity in the travel industry, and is a major factor in influencing customer satisfaction with airports," said Linda Hirneise, partner and executive director of travel industry research at J.D. Power and Associates. "Even though faster options are often available to expedite the check-in process, passengers either aren’t aware of them or just aren’t yet comfortable using them. The check-in process has the greatest impact on overall airport satisfaction. Airports need to make sure these options are available to passengers and to continue to promote their time-saving benefits."

Wait times at security checkpoints have increased 15 percent, from an average of 13 minutes in 2003 to 15 minutes in 2004. By segment, the average wait time at large airports is 16 minutes, 15 minutes at medium airports and 13 minutes at small airports. Washington-Dulles, Denver and Los Angeles are among the airports with the longest security wait times, while Singapore, London-Gatwick and Sydney have some of the shortest waits.

The study also finds that satisfaction is much higher with airports that provide an environment where passengers can multi-task. This includes services such as a wide selection of eateries and restaurants, access to business centers, wireless Internet connections and abundant shopping. More than one-half (54%) of passengers purchase food at the airport, while 37 percent shop at retail stores.

"Since September 11, safety, check-in options, security checks and the time it takes to go through the entire airport experience have forever changed the airport passenger experience," said Hirneise. "The keys to improving airport satisfaction across the globe require improving passenger facilitation, managing wait times and providing an environment where airport passengers can be productive."

Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) ranks highest in passenger satisfaction among large airports, performing particularly well across all key measures of airport satisfaction. Three U.S. airports follow in the ranking: Orlando (MCO), Denver (DEN) and Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW), respectively.

Singapore’s Changi International (SIN) ranks highest among medium-sized airports for the third consecutive year and receives the highest overall passenger satisfaction score in the study by a significant margin. Singapore is followed in the rankings by Pittsburgh (PIT), Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky (CVG) and Portland (PDX), respectively.

Overall satisfaction is significantly higher for passengers opting for small airports, where wait times and passenger facilitation are generally more manageable. Calgary (YYC) and San Antonio (SAT) rank highest in a tie among small airports. Calgary performs particularly well in terminal facilities and retail concessions, while San Antonio receives particularly high ratings from passengers for the security check. Calgary and San Antonio are followed in the rankings by Austin (AUS), Boise (BOI) and Indianapolis (IND), respectively.

The 2004 Global Airport Satisfaction Index Study is based on responses from more than 9,000 passengers who took a flight between October 2003 and November 2004. Respondents were surveyed in six different languages and each evaluated up to two different airports.

Headquartered in Westlake Village, Calif., J.D. Power and Associates is an ISO 9001-registered global marketing information services firm operating in key business sectors including market research, forecasting, consulting, training and customer satisfaction.





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