daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 24th, 2009, 06:54 PM   #61
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

Safety probe ordered after man dies when vehicle plunges to ground on building site
13 November 2009
South China Morning Post

An investigation has been launched into whether proper safety measures were followed on a Kowloon Bay construction site where a man died yesterday when his vehicle plunged from the first floor to the ground.

Shortly before 10am, Yau Hung, 37, reversed a tractor-like vehicle, used to move construction waste, into a space near the edge of the first floor of a building under construction in Wang Chiu Road. An open cargo hold at the back of the vehicle was loaded with waste. Police said the vehicle had stopped and the waste was about to be unloaded at the time of the incident.

"The centre of gravity was probably at the back of the vehicle as construction waste was being unloaded, so it flipped over and plunged to the ground level," a police officer said.

The vehicle landed on its side and some waste fell out of the cargo hold.

Yau was taken to United Christian Hospital, where doctors declared him dead at 10.24am.

The Labour Department sent officers to the site to investigate. "We will issue a notice to suspend work at the site temporarily to stop work concerning unloading waste on the edge of a building being constructed until safety measures have been improved," the department said.

Chow Luen-kiu, chairman of the Hong Kong Construction Industry Employees General Union, said the Labour Department should look into whether proper safety procedures were followed when construction waste was unloaded from the truck.

He said drivers of such a tractor were required to receive training. "Initial investigation showed the victim had attended the training and was a qualified person."

The chief executive of the Association for the Rights of Industrial Accident Victims, Chan Kam-hong, said Yau was the family breadwinner, with a wife and teenage daughter and son. His daughter is studying in the United States.

The use of the vehicle involved in the accident was regulated under the Factories and Industrial Undertakings (Loadshifting Machinery) Regulation, which also covered excavators and loaders, the Labour Department said. The law required operators to obtain a special licence.

Construction Association chairman Conrad Wong Tin-cheung said different building sites employed different safety measures and the association would review the situation to see if they needed to be standardised.

"Rear mirrors or devices are installed for big vehicles so drivers can see the rear view of the vehicle. We will consider whether such devices should be installed for small vehicles," he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old December 6th, 2009, 07:18 PM   #62
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

Home furnisher Ikea shows off its supersized Sha Tin makeover
2 December 2009
SCMP

After seeing off British home improvement giant B&Q last year, Jardine Matheson's Ikea is now rolling out a supersized version of flat-pack and Allen key retail heaven.

Following a year-long renovation, the retailer reopened its Sha Tin store yesterday featuring 120,000 square feet of floor space, 35 display rooms, 7,500 items and a 130-seat Swedish restaurant. An even bigger outlet is now planned at Kowloon Bay.

With its lightweight, knock-together furniture better suited to the city's cramped living space, Ikea proved a formidable competitor to B&Q whose outdoor barbecue sets and garden supplies were more applicable to European homes.

The Sha Tin outlet is the biggest of Ikea's three stores in the city and takes up the fifth and sixth floors of Sun Hung Kai's HomeSquare in Grand Central Plaza.

Ikea's Hong Kong operations, controlled by Jardine Matheson Holdings through Dairy Farm International Holdings, also has shops in Causeway Bay and Telford Plaza, Kowloon Bay.

Benjamin Birks, general manager of Ikea Hong Kong, said the Swedish home furnisher had benefited from the fact that Hongkongers had become more attached to their homes during the recent tough economic times.

"Home becomes even more important to people as they spend much more time there and are more aware of the value of a beautiful home," said Birks.

Ikea is now planning to open an even bigger outlet in MegaBox at Kowloon Bay in the middle of next year, to replace its Telford Plaza shop.

The 150,000 sq ft space at MegaBox was vacated earlier this year by B&Q, which became a victim of punishing rents and the economic slowdown. Europe's biggest home improvements retailer said it was closing owing to poor business performance and the fact it had not found the right location with the right space and at the right price.

The opening of HomeSquare Ikea is expected to bring a double-digit increase in customers and turnover at the shopping centre, which aims to become the city's biggest one-stop retailer for home updaters.

Henry Lam Ka-keung, general manager of leasing at Sun Hung Kai Real Estate Agency, forecast that customer traffic this Christmas might climb 12 per cent and sales by 15 per cent compared to the same period last year thanks to the "Ikea effect".

Lam said the average rent at HomeSquare stood at HK$70 per square foot, and they had made "some minor adjustments" over the rent level with Ikea before the shop opened. Aside from Ikea, the home-themed shopping centre also sells electrical appliances, lighting, accessories and furniture.

"The customers we target are middle-class families living in the New Territories, the most populated region in Hong Kong," he said. "We are looking forward to seeing more than 20 per cent growth in sales next year."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 13th, 2009, 07:09 PM   #63
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

By fatshe :



__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 21st, 2010, 08:21 PM   #64
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

Elevated walkway system in Kowloon Bay gazetted
Friday, January 15, 2010
Government Press Release

The Government published a notice in the Gazette today (January 15) on the construction of an elevated walkway system in Kowloon Bay. The walkway system will link up the Kowloon Bay Industrial Area and Telford Gardens to the MTR Kowloon Bay Station.

The proposed works include construction of a covered 550-metre elevated walkway system; associated staircases, escalators and lifts for the proposed elevated walkway system; modification of a section of Wang Hoi Road near the junction with Sheung Yuet Road, including the provision of a pedestrian crossing; permanent or temporary closure and reconstruction/modification of existing facilities nearby such as refuge island and footbridge staircase; and ancillary works including landscaping and drainage works.

Plan and scheme of the works are available for public inspection at the following government offices during office hours:

(i) Central and Western District Office, Public Enquiry Service Centre, Unit 5, Ground Floor, The Center, 99 Queen's Road Central;

(ii) Kwun Tong District Office, Public Enquiry Service Centre, Lower Ground Floor, Kwun Tong District Branch Offices Building, 6 Tung Yan Street, Kwun Tong; and

(iii) District Lands Office, Kowloon East, 10th Floor, Yau Ma Tei Carpark Building, 250 Shanghai Street.

Any person who wishes to object to the proposed works or the use, or both, should write to the Secretary for Transport and Housing, 16/F, Murray Building, Garden Road, Hong Kong, on or before March 16.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2010, 02:43 PM   #65
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

Customers bid farewell to an `old neighbor'
1 March 2010
The Standard

Long-time customers flocked yesterday to Jusco in Lok Fu to bid farewell to the venerable department store.

The 148,000-square-foot outlet, which opened in 1991, will be relocated to MegaBox in Kowloon Bay in the middle of the year.

Shoppers yesterday hunted for bedroom accessories, household goods and clothes sold at heavy discounts.

Some wrote on a board, stating how much they will miss the ``old neighbor,'' while others praised the store's service and caring culture.

One customer wrote that the Lok Fu store forms part of her childhood memories, as she used to hang out there with friends after school, or with her grandmother on weekends. ``It was where I used to hang around for 18 years. I will miss it so much,'' the writer said.

Tang Chun-mei, 30, took pictures with her son.

``I have been living in Wong Tai Sin for more than 10 years. The store is where I spent my free time with friends and family,'' Tang said. ``I will miss it because it has become part of my daily life.''

Tang spent about HK$2,000 on blankets and clothes. ``The pricey items were really a bargain,'' she said.

Promoter Yip So-ching, 50, who worked at the store for about seven years, said that fellow workers and customers are all amicable and cordial.

``The most enjoyable part of my job is chatting with customers, especially the elderly, when we are not bogged down in work. We talk about everything,'' Yip said.

A saleswoman, surnamed Soo, had worked in the Lok Fu store for four years. ``There is care and congeniality. Everyone will miss it so much,'' said Soo, who will relocate to a new branch in Whampoa Garden. ``All my fellow workers will be dispersed to different stores. I hope I can get used to the new working environment.''

Kenny Young, 29, drove from Tsuen Wan with his sister and girlfriend to spend HK$1,800 on blankets, pots and underwear.

``Despite the fact the economy is recovering, shoppers still spend prudently for reasonably priced items,'' Young said.

A spokesman for the Link Reit said the department store APiTA is expected to open this year in Lok Fu Plaza.

The block vacated by Jusco will be renovated to improve movement between different sections of the mall.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 26th, 2010, 08:35 PM   #66
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

By Car L :



__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 27th, 2010, 08:40 AM   #67
caelus
Registered User
 
caelus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 323
Likes (Received): 5

^ one of the ugliest building in the world
caelus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 27th, 2010, 12:47 PM   #68
premeet01245
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 18
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Introduction
Formerly an industrial area, Kowloon Bay is emerging as a secondary financial district. Located in the eastern part of Kowloon, there have been numerous redevelopments and new skyscrapers have popped up in recent years. This thread will keep track of projects happening in this exciting part of town.

Location :



Examples of Redevelopments :















Stock of the Bay
12 December 2005
Hong Kong Standard

Defying the laws of physics, if not of real estate, Hong Kong is a city with more than one "core." Every few years, it gives birth to a new one, and the honor, in this first decade of the 21st century, belongs to Kowloon Bay.

Forget Central. Forget Causeway Bay, Quarry Bay and Taikoo Shing. A district that was once mostly factories and warehouses abutting the old Kai Tak airport is where the commercial real estate industry is currently pursuing its holy grail, "Grade A" office space.

In Kowloon East as a whole, the amount of office space is expected to grow 70 percent between now and 2010, making it a match, accommodation-wise, for Tsim Sha Tsui East. By that time, Kowloon Bay alone will be home to 5.7 million square feet of Grade A premises, said Simon Smith, senior director of research at property consultant Savills.

It will be several years before established core areas produce any significant quantities of new office supply. This is being fully reflected in prices. At Two IFC, Central's most prestigious address, for instance, rents have reached a prohibitive HK$100 per square foot per month.

"It's very difficult to find fresh sites in core areas these days," said Smith.

The concept of Grade A space is rather nebulous, referring to buildings with the basic modern conveniences such as elevators, air-conditioning and telecoms ducts, regardless of location.

Not all Grade A office space is created equal, however.

"We do not see top-tier financial institutions moving out of Central," Smith stressed, but there is strong demand for premises in Kowloon Bay from manufacturers, trading companies and back-offices of banks.

The analyst said Kowloon Bay faces no real threat from International Commerce Centre, a 2.5 million square foot monster now under construction in West Kowloon. It is wooing a different target group, composed of bigger multinationals, lawyers and accountants.

Strictly speaking, this is Kowloon Bay's second makeover. The first came at the start of the 1990s when a number of the featureless, low-rise factory bunkers the district was famous for yielded their places to dual-vocation buildings designed for tenants who needed both industrial and office premises.

Sino Land started the trend with its Metro Centre One in 1991, followed the next year by Kerry Properties with the first phase of Enterprise Square. The two developers remain the driving force in the district.

Despite the district's proximity to Kai Tak, developers appear unconcerned about what will become of the former airport lands. Whether Kai Tak, according to the various proposals now circulating, is given over to a cruise ship terminal, a mega-stadium, housing, green space, or all of the above, it will be years _ and many political controversies _ before any of it begins to affect Kowloon Bay.

The focal point of the current transformation is Kerry's Enterprise Square 3, opened last year. A silvery, cylindrical building of 41 stories, it's the architectural standout of the district, especially after dark when the anchor tenant _ the international garment chain Esprit _ switches on its huge red neon sign.

Right next door, Kerry is building Enterprise Square 5, incorporating a 1.1 million sqft retail complex called MegaBox and 500,000 sqft of office space, due for completion in 2007.

Across the street, private developer Glorious Sun has a 680,000 sqft office building under construction.

Behind it, preparation work is under way for a 710,000 sqft office tower for another private builder, Manhattan Realty. Part of the same cluster is Sino Land's new 600,000 sqft office and retail complex, where work is just beginning. Sino purchased the land at a hotly contested government auction in February, forking out a generous HK$1.82billion, nearly three times the government's minimum asking price. Sino chairman Robert Ng, who said the district could easily become as big and diversified as Tsim Sha Tsui East, revealed that the company might also locate a five-star hotel on the same site.

Several streets away, the six-story Sing Tao Building was sold in July to a private developer for HK$370 million. It will probably be demolished to make way for a 500,000 sqft commercial building.

Even if all of these projects are not enough to satisfy the hunger for new offices, there are two Kowloon Bay lots totaling 667,000 sqft on the government's current application list of land that may be sold to developers, said Kenny Suen, managing director of consultant Vigers Asia Pacific.

There's talk as well that a site earmarked for a hotel with gross floor area of 855,480 sqft may be added to next year's list.

It can only be a matter of time before more owners of buildings whose functions don't necessarily fit with the concept of an office district decide to cash in on the land boom.

Though its owner denies having any immediate plans, the Kowloon Motor Bus depot is considered a good candidate for redevelopment. Conveniently enough, the bus company is 33 percent owned by Sun Hung Kai Properties, one of Hong Kong's two largest developers.

The Oriental Daily News building has similar potential. The newspaper moved its main operations to a new plant in Tai Po earlier this year.

The Hong Kong International Trade and Exhibition Centre has long been a disappointment to its owner, Hopewell Holdings. The building, opened in 1996 to provide exhibition and meeting space as well as offices, had an occupancy rate of only 60 percent, according to its latest annual report. Hopewell now aims to turn it into an entertainment destination with total floor area of 600,000 sqft.

And Henderson Land, the No 3 developer in town, is in talks with the government about converting Big Star Centre, opposite the Sing Tao Building, into a 10-story hotel with 296 rooms.

To buy office space in Kowloon Bay now costs anywhere from HK$2,600 to HK$3,200 per square foot, up 40 percent since the start of the year, said Suen. Office rents in the district have climbed almost 16 percent to HK$12- $16 psf per month.

While industrial rents in the district are up 7.3 percent on average to HK$8- $11 psf per month, Midland Realty says the industrial buildings farthest from the Kowloon Bay MTR Station command only HK$5-$7 psf.

"Clearly, if I owned an industrial building in Kowloon Bay, after seeing those figures I would knock it down and put up a commercial building in its place," Suen said.

The population of the areas surrounding Kowloon Bay certainly seems sufficient to support big retail developments such as Kerry's MegaBox.

Suen said Kowloon Bay is a catchment area for nearly three million people. It's estimated there are 100,000 jobs in the district already, a figure that should rise to 120,000 by 2008 as new office buildings open.

"There's a demand for shopping centers for personal spending and office needs," he said.

One problem that could slow the pace of Kowloon Bay's development is inadequate public transportation.

The Kowloon Bay MTR Station is linked to the MTRC's own Telford Plaza commercial complex, but there are no subterranean walkways to connect it with other buildings. Bus stops are sparsely located, and some of the biggest office buildings in the district are at least a half-hour walk from the subway.

The Hong Kong Economic Times recently reported that five developers, including Sino, Kerry and Hopewell, would like to form a partnership with the MTRC to build an elevated light rail system to link their developments with Kowloon Bay Station.

Lam Chan, MTRC projects communications manager, said none of the developers had submitted any proposals yet. The transit operator carried out a preliminary study of the district, according to its 2003 annual report, but Lam said the report had been shelved. Any new transport initiatives will have to be coordinated with the overall planning for the area, he added.

Suen of Vigers believes the developers are still haggling over the proposed route of the light rail line and how to divide up the costs of the project.

The analyst said that, well before light rail becomes reality, there will be a network of footbridges, similar to what exists in Central, to connect Kerry's buildings, notably the MegaBox retail complex, with Telford Plaza and the MTR.

A transitional neighborhood such as Kowloon Bay is bound to produce some stark contrasts before the new finally overwhelms the old _ what Savills' Smith, in the jargon of the industry, calls "interface problems."

For example, both the sleek office towers being built by Glorious Sun and Manhattan Realty will initially stand cheek by jowl with the peeling paint and crumbling masonry of the Yip On Factory Estate, which was built by the Housing Authority in the 1970s.

Suen said the authority may return the land to the government to allow for redevelopment, or heed suggestions to put the buildings to other uses, as "creative arts villages," for example.
nice my self vipi I want to watch it from near
premeet01245 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 3rd, 2010, 08:29 PM   #69
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

AEON boss looks on bright side in Kowloon Bay
The Standard
Thursday, June 03, 2010

Chain store AEON (0984) is about to pump as much as HK$100 million into expansion in the second half of the year.

That was revealed yesterday as AEON opened a HK$30 million store at MegaBox in Kowloon Bay.

It aims to open one store in Dongguan and three to four supermarkets in Shenzhen and Guangzhou, said Lam Man-tin, managing director of AEON Stores (Hong Kong).

Another Kowloon Bay store is also on the cards. "Economic growth in Kowloon Bay is very strong and we believe the market in this area is large enough to support another three to four stores," Lam said.

On average, he added, new AEON stores break even within 18 months and generate profit within four years. He is confident, however, that the MegaBox store will perform better than that.

Lam warned that Hong Kong's retail sector - though robust in the first quarter - may slow in the second half. Still, he said, while sentiment might be affected by Beijing's curbs and turmoil in Europe, positive growth is expected.

With HK$1.9 billion cash in hand at the end of 2009, Lam said, AEON could comfortably commit to investment of up to HK$100 million for stores and supermarkets opening in the SAR and the mainland.

All 14 AEON stores in southern China have done better this year compared to 2009.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 10th, 2010, 07:09 PM   #70
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

By ming10120 from a Hong Kong photography forum :

__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2011, 05:15 PM   #71
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

Greenery cools concrete jungle
1 November 2010
South China Morning Post





The ultimate green office is likely to be a virtual one - and the prospect of more companies striving to reduce their carbon footprint will be a welcome prospect for serviced office providers.

Some business centre owners in the United States have resorted to calculating reductions in carbon emissions made by companies that use their offices. One report, circulated by The McLeland Group, trumpeted a 94 per cent drop when a virtual office was used rather than a shared physical space. The results usually contribute to an alluring marketing campaign, as working in an office takes a toll on the environment with greater vehicle use. This places a strain on scarce resources, such as water and energy, and encourages development that can swallow open spaces.

While the virtual office is being increasingly used by companies and sole traders, who rely on a prestige address and exclusive phone line based in the central business district as they travel or work from home, physical locations are becoming more environmentally friendly.

Hong Kong is not the only city said to have suffered from heightened heat induced by the "wall effect" of rows of tall buildings that prevent air circulation. Greenery has been laid atop office towers in Chicago to create about four million sqft of gardens aimed at cooling the concrete jungle during summer. Similar methods have been adopted in Europe and, while the scientific benefits may be debatable, the aesthetic qualities are more pleasing.

While limited space, utility equipment and machine rooms on top of many office buildings in Hong Kong prevent landscape gardening on an impressive scale, big developers are at least seeing the benefits of factoring greenery into buildings.

One example is Sino's Exchange Tower in Kowloon Bay that lays claim to be the first office building in Hong Kong with a green balcony on each floor. The building also includes "podium garden" restaurants on its second floor and a sky garden on the 15th floor that is used for staff meetings, lunches and social gatherings.

Yet, despite such efforts and the heralding of greener credentials, eco-friendly fixtures and fittings are still hard to find, particularly when offices are being refurbished on a tight budget. According to a report by property industry magazine RFP, organisations flush with cash - such as government projects, big law firms and banks - are driving the demand for green building products.

More institutions are also eager to gain Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification, which is the world standard for green buildings and may raise their standing among environmentally conscious investors.

Industry watchers say the good news for the green lobby is that mainland developers are also aiming for greener buildings when it comes to office development. But it all comes down to planning to ensure budgets and project deadlines can ensure offices can be made nearly as green as the green, green grass of home.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 06:07 AM   #72
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

Prior posted by Car L :

133 Hoi Bun Road
Kwun Tong
(last post 612)


2010 Nov


2011 March
133 Hoi Bun Road
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 05:40 PM   #73
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

Prior posted by Car L :

Octa Tower
(8 Lam Chak Street 九龍灣臨澤街8號) (See Post 589)



__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2011, 06:43 PM   #74
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

4/9









__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 26th, 2011, 05:57 PM   #75
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

4/24











__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 27th, 2011, 03:15 AM   #76
CarlisleSg
Registered User
 
CarlisleSg's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Singapore
Posts: 15
Likes (Received): 0

I heard from my friends about new developments in the Kowloon Bay area. So I had to see for myself. I'm planning to visit HongKong by the end of the year, I hope to see the new hotels and buildings.
__________________
"Advice is what we ask for when we already know the answer but wish we didn't."
- Erica Jong
CarlisleSg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 31st, 2011, 10:44 AM   #77
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlisleSg View Post
I heard from my friends about new developments in the Kowloon Bay area. So I had to see for myself. I'm planning to visit HongKong by the end of the year, I hope to see the new hotels and buildings.
Or you can see the emerging skyline from across the harbour in North Point / Quarry Bay like in the photos I posted.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2011, 08:08 AM   #78
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

Kowloon East offers much affordability
The Standard
Thursday, July 28, 2011



Hong Kong, being the world's most expensive commercial real estate market, has seen fierce competition for premium Grade A office space.

But too much emphasis has been placed on the Central business district over supply shortage, surging rents and affordability.

Expensive office rents may cause firms to consider opportunities in other Asian financial centers, such as Singapore.

In Hong Kong, there is ample new office supply in the rapidly emerging commercial district of Kowloon East, providing adequate, affordable space to existing, expanding and new occupants.

Over the past several years, completion of new Grade A office developments in the district, together with their competitive offerings, have attracted several major tenants to relocate from traditional areas such as Central or Tsim Sha Tsui.

For instance, the insurance sector - including Manulife, Zurich and AIA - has adopted this change in attitude.

In fact, spurred by new infrastructure developments of the Sha Tin- Central Link (upon full completion in 2020, connecting Sha Tin to Central via Kai Tak), and the gradual development of the decentralized commercial hub of Kai Tak, more tenants have changed their perceptions of the Kowloon East area, mainly defined as Kwun Tong and Kowloon Bay.

Sourcing and manufacturing companies, such as Nike and Siemens, for example, have established greater presences in Kowloon East, moving from Tsim Sha Tsui.

As of this month, the sourcing and manufacturing sector comprise 23 percent of tenants in Kowloon East, compared with a paltry 2percent in 2009.

This resulted in a narrowing rental gap between Tsim Sha Tsui and Kowloon East - down to HK$14 per square foot from HK$17 psf - given the current monthly average rent of HK$43 psf in Tsim Sha Tsui, and HK$29 psf in Kowloon East, an all-time high for that area.

Following the 17 percent hike in Grade A office rents in Kowloon East during the first half of 2011, we expect growth momentum to taper off to 8 percent for the second half.

Joanne Lee is an assistant manager of research and advisory at Colliers International. The real estate consultancy has integrated teams of specialists to speed up success for institutional and private clients by developing solutions to give their properties a competitive business advantage.

E-mail: [email protected]
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2011, 06:35 PM   #79
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

7/24









__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2011, 05:55 PM   #80
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17806

Source : http://www.fotop.net/moodforlove

__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu