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Old May 12th, 2011, 09:46 PM   #1
inno4321
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SEOUL | Public Transport



Another subway tunel pass away Above ceiling 15cm





SOURCE: http://blog.naver.com/zergling33?Red...o=120128685556




SOURCE: http://blog.naver.com/dnsrud012?Redi...No=90079722271

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Last edited by inno4321; October 9th, 2011 at 04:53 PM.
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Old May 13th, 2011, 05:27 PM   #2
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Great photos. Seoul has one of the best metro in the word!
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Old May 13th, 2011, 07:33 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FabriFlorence View Post
Great photos. Seoul has one of the best metro in the word!
i like seoul subway.
I heard about Firenze. Someday i want to visit Italy.
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Last edited by inno4321; May 13th, 2011 at 07:41 PM.
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Old May 13th, 2011, 07:35 PM   #4
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Seoul Dongdaemun history and culture station



source: http://blog.daum.net/byun3610/6506180





source:http://ferrovia.blog.me/70095307532
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Old May 13th, 2011, 08:06 PM   #5
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What are the rules for photographing trains in S. Korea? By this I mean above ground trains (not subway trains underground- platform doors make this impossible anyway). I heard snapshots are OK, but railway officials don't like you if you stay to long on the platform just taking pictures, unless you ask for permission beforehand- is this true? I ask b/c I plan to visit Seoul this summer to take pictures mainly of Korail trains, and some of the older trains on subway lines 1 and 2. I like to linger on the platform for 30~50 min. (or longer), which is the style in Japan and other places where there are many railfans.
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Old May 24th, 2011, 06:48 PM   #6
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I get a confusion, that are Jungang, Bundang, Gyeongchun & Gyeongui lines metro? Or suburban rail?

Seoul’s Subway network is the only in South Korea, which is running reciprocal service between metro & suburban train. Especially for line 1, I think it uses both suburban train & metro. Sometimes metros go to suburbs, and sometimes suburban trains come to city centre via underground tunnel. Probably the gauge & current collection system is same (by overhead wire).



But I think after looking this map - Jungang, Bundang, Gyeongchun & Gyeongui are suburban train lines, because it crosses city limits and goes away.

Are these 4 lines uses underground tunnels, or run completely on surface?

Urban rail fans of Seoul please clear this, and write I’m right or wrong. Please clarify this.
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Old May 25th, 2011, 12:47 PM   #7
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This will devolve into the splitting-hairs debates over the definitions of metro and commuter rail, which is a headache I will leave for others.

I used to live in the southern suburbs of Seoul, near Sunae Station on the Bundang Line and then Byeongjeom Station on Line 1, so I've had plenty of experience with the metro area's urban rail options.

Greater Seoul doesn't have a designated commuter rail service. Several of the subway (as it's called collectively) lines serve CR-like functions, not unlike BART in the SF Bay Area. Some of the Mugunghwa (local) trains are effectively commuter rail, though, and can be quicker and far more pleasant than the subway, depending on where you're going, where you're coming from, and what time of day it is.

Line 1 runs mostly at grade, although some of the center-city stations are in tunnel. It also serves central Incheon, in addition to linking Incheon and Seoul, as well as Suwon to the south. I'd call it a hybrid of metro and commuter rail: metro frequencies, but CR distances between stations. This is also true of the Gyeongui and Gyeongchun lines, although they hadn't been brought into the metro network when I left a few years ago.

The Bundang Line is a different story, because it's mostly underground and it passes through a very dense urban strip. Although Bundang is one of Seoul's satellite cities, it's very much an urban center in its own right, so the Bundang Line functions as Bundang's metro as well as its link to Seoul proper.

Again, a lot of this is a matter of semantics. It doesn't matter whether we call these rail lines metro or CR in English, as long as they're serving their purpose, which they are.
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Old May 26th, 2011, 11:39 PM   #8
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To see some photos of Seoul metro, now I’m almost sure that line 1, 3 & 4 is hybrid lines, i.e. these three lines uses both metro & suburban train, and operated by both SEOUL METRO & KORAIL. Korail trains are suburban trains, although due to a developed country, there is almost no difference between those.

Metro area:-
Line 1- from Cheongnyangni to Seoul Rail Station.
Line 3 – from Jichuk to Ogeum.
Line 4 - from Dangogae to Namtaeryoung.

Rest of these line are suburban train area
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Old June 1st, 2011, 03:25 PM   #9
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I’ve some questions (arose after viewing some websites). Please answer one by one –
1) Will line 7 also be extended to Incheon to connect with Incheon metro like line 1?
2) Will line 9 be extended from Gangnam to Bangi Station?
3) What is the total length of Seoul subway counting only from line 1 to line 9?
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Old June 2nd, 2011, 05:35 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashis Mitra View Post
I’ve some questions (arose after viewing some websites). Please answer one by one –
1) Will line 7 also be extended to Incheon to connect with Incheon metro like line 1?

2) Will line 9 be extended from Gangnam to Bangi Station?
3) What is the total length of Seoul subway counting only from line 1 to line 9?
1)2) Until now have no plan for 7 line line 9 extend to incheon, Bangi. Instead GTX PLAN(HIGH SPEED SUBWAY)
3) total length of Seoul subway 152km
5line 52.3Km
6line 35.1Km
7line 46.9Km
8line 17.7Km
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Old June 6th, 2011, 10:06 PM   #11
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You've said the length only about line 5 to 8, but what is the length of line 1, 2, 3, 4 & 9?

Today many people don’t know that Seoul once had a 76 Km tram network, which was opened in 1/5/1899 directly as electric tram.

On May 17 in 1899 when the first tram departed Jongno for Cheongnyangni amidst great fanfare, Seoul became only the second East Asian city to acquire this wonder of modern technology.

The tram service was the brainchild of two enterprising American businessmen, Henry Collbran and Harry Bostwick who secured the right to establish a tram service in the city of Seoul. The businessmen were also required to install electric lighting in downtown Seoul as part of the agreement.

May 17, 1899 happened to be Buddha’s Birthday and was one of the most popular Korean holidays. The entire length of the line was crowded with people many of whom had come from afar to catch a glimpse of this wonder of modern technology. On its inaugural trip the tram was even forced to stop several times because of the huge crowds. Over the first weeks a majority of the passengers took the tram not out of necessity but for the sheer joy of riding the new contraption and many of the passengers indeed spent the entire day on the tram!

The early trams had two classes and first class tickets were twice the price of the second class. The early Korean trams moved very slowly and had no designated stops. Passengers could board the slow-moving car at any point along the line.

Even King Gojong was inclined to get in on the action, albeit preserving due royal dignity and separation from the common folk. Of the nine carriages in the original stable, eight were designed for normal passenger service while one was specially built for his majesty's convenience. King Gojong used this personal tram car when he visited the tomb of his wife Queen Min who had recently been assassinated by Japanese-sponsored mutineers. The royal tram may have had no parallel anywhere else in the world but unfortunately the tradition did not last long. The royal tram was made redundant with the advent of the limousine.

And naturally it was not long before the first traffic accident occurred. On the 26th of May, just 10 days after the spectacular inaugural trip, a five-year-old child was struck by a tram near Pagoda Park on Jongno Street. At the time all tram drivers were Japanese. Koreans at the time invariably thought the worst of anything the Japanese did. Therefore when the bystanders witnessed the accident they considered it the deliberate murder of an innocent child by the horrible Japanese. The tram was attacked by an angry mob but the driver and his conductor made a lucky escape, chased by the boy’s father who had armed himself with an axe. The carriage itself was burned to a crisp.

After the incident all the Japanese tram drivers went on strike. They demanded the right to carry handguns for self-protection, a permanent police guard in all trams and a special insurance bounty. These demands were rejected and the drivers decided to return to Japan. This temporarily halted the operations of the service until the arrival of some American drivers several months later.

In 1909 Henry Collbran was forced to sell his company to the Japanese who by then had established a near stranglehold over the Korean economy. This takeover did not adversely influence the future of the tram. Throughout the colonial era the tram network continued to grow. In 1910 Seoul boasted 37 tram cars while by 1935 their number had increased to 154. By 1935 some 150,000 people rode the tram every day or a fifteen-fold increase in 25 years! Trams ran from 5 a.m. to 12:30 a.m. and welded the rapidly growing city into a coherent whole.

During the Korean War Seoul changed hands four times. Needless to say, the military operations nearly wiped the entire urban transportation system. In 1951, the Gyeongseong Electric Company which operated the trams had 111 tram carriages, but on any given day less than half of this number was able to leave the depot. It was decided to import some used American streetcars. They came from Nashville (Tenn.) where the electric streetcar service had been just discontinued. The 20 carriages arrived in 1952, obtained via the CIC (yes, this stands for Counter-Intelligence Corps and no, I do not know why they were looking for used streetcars instead of spies!) Soon after the end of the Korean War, more American trams were bought through FAO grants .

By the early 1960s the municipal tram company's fleet had expanded to the grand total of 213 carriages. On the average day some 350,000 people used the trams. At the time the trams were often described as "the feet of the people of Seoul."

By the mid-1960s the tram service in Seoul was in dire straits despite the unprecedented scale of its operation. First of all, the local government did not allow the operators to increase fees - even though those were days of rampant inflation. In October 1957 the rates were fixed at the level of 25 hwan (the then Korean currency) for one ride (after the currency reform of 1962, this would be 2.5 won). The government wanted to keep the service affordable, but by the early 1960s this policy led to huge losses.

By this time the equipment was wearing out. The average age of the carriages was 34 years, and the rail tracks had not been changed for decades. An upgrade would be expensive. For all practical purposes, the tram network had to be completely rebuilt and the then poor city could hardly afford such an investment.

However, the major problem came with the arrival of the motorcar. In 1965, Seoul had merely 16,624 registered vehicles - not too many for a city with a population of some three million people. Nonetheless, the tram began to create problems. Boarding a tram was a nuisance because the rails were laid in the middle of the road. This meant that every time a tram arrived at a stop, all motor traffic came to a complete standstill for several minutes.

In the 1960s trams were going out of fashion worldwide. They nearly disappeared in the US, and were considerably scaled down in Japan. New York lost its streetcar service in 1956. In the mid-1960s, the tram looked decisively a thing of the past, an unfashionable relic of the early industrial era. Perhaps, in the demise of the Seoul tram this intellectual fashion played greater role than all rational considerations combined.

In the 1950s the system acquired 20 cars second-hand from Atlanta and 15 from Los Angeles. In 1964 there were 16 routes operated with 223 cars over 76 km of track.

In April 1966, a new Seoul mayor declared that the tram service in the Korean capital would be dismantled in the near future. Of course, the employees of the tram company were not happy to hear this news. A strike followed, but to no avail. In early June, 1966, the trams ceased to operate on some routes along Jongno Street, and the dismantling of the network began with increasing speed.



The last tram traveled the Seoul streets on November 30, 1968. After 69 years, 6 months, and 13 days (from its first run), the tram stopped operating, and only few people remember the large cars which once traveled Seoul streets. The city has been taken by the cars, for better or worse.



SEOUL also had a suburban streetcar system. The Kyongsong Tramway operated two suburban lines over 14.4 km of track in the semi-rural area east and southeast of Seoul. Service to Duksom and Kwangnaro began ca. 1933 from a terminal at Seoul's East Gate opposite the city tramway company's car barns.

Today I personally giving thanks for that Seoul have much large subway system than old tramway. It is today a very clean & green city for this.



Note: Busan had also one tram, operation ceased on May 20, 1968. Today Busan also has a great subway system.

CAN ANYBODY SAY ME WHICH AREAS WERE FORMERLY SERVED BY TRAM, COMPARING WITH MY METRO MAY POSTED BEFORE?
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Old June 12th, 2011, 09:47 PM   #12
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ONE CITY - ONE METRO COMPANY

It will be best to operate all 9 metro lines under 1 authority. I heard that line 1 to 4 is operating by Seoul Metro, line 5 to 8 is operating by SMRTC, and line 9 is operating by Veolia. Three different companies have different rules, incompatibility of exchange etc. with other lines, which will confuse mainly outsiders/newcomers of Seoul. Also, may one day one of them will got difficulties to operation, but part of the city will be locked.

So I suggest to hand-over line 1 to 4 and 9 to SMRTC for smoothest operation, because after reading many articles and looking its website, I realize that SMRTC is the best operating company among three. One authority will be best for Seoul’s subway system.
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Old June 19th, 2011, 10:52 PM   #13
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What is the total length of line 1, 2 3 & 4?

Please try to answer these -
1) Left side, right side or both side, - which type of platforms are in most numbers in Seoul subway network?
2) Elevated, ground level or underground, - which type of stations are in most numbers in Seoul subway network?
3) Which are the highest and deepest stations of Seoul metro?
4) Which is the busiest metro station?
5) Which stations have interchange facility with suburban rail network?
6) Where is/are the depot(s) of the subway network?
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Old June 20th, 2011, 08:28 AM   #14
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Hehe I have a few questions of my own as well:

1) How are things going on with the first private sector railway service in South Korea (Seoul Metro Line # 9)?

2) What is the dominant smart card/IC card payment system in South Korea especially for use a transport payment - T-money, U Pass, KTX family card, others???
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Old June 20th, 2011, 03:36 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by inno4321 View Post
Another subway tunel pass away Above ceiling 15cm
Very similar to Porta Venezia S-lines station in Milano



Probably the excavation technique is the same: the cellular arch method invented in '90s precisely to build Porta Venezia station


http://www.wikipatents.com/US-Patent...ar-arch/Page-4
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Old June 20th, 2011, 04:17 PM   #16
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Where can I find a track map of Seolu's subwys system?
And a survey about the rolling stock?
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Old June 21st, 2011, 03:23 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GENIUS LOCI View Post
Very similar to Porta Venezia S-lines station in Milano

Probably the excavation technique is the same: the cellular arch method invented in '90s precisely to build Porta Venezia station
[/url]
OOPS Very similiar. same technique?

Quote:
Originally Posted by steckner View Post
Where can I find a track map of Seolu's subwys system?
And a survey about the rolling stock?

I'm afraid that I'm not sure whether it is track map or not.
But this is Seoul subway line map address
http://www.seoulmetro.co.kr/station/eng/linemap.action
http://www.seoulmetro.co.kr/ Right Upper side "ENGLISH VERSION"
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Old June 21st, 2011, 11:26 AM   #18
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Quote:
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OOPS Very similiar. same technique?
I found out this interesting pdf on Seoul metro construction techniques.

You can find the excavation of the station of the pic from page 25 to page 27: the method is the one of the cellular arch, same of Milan's Porta Venezia station.

http://www.cedb.gov.hk/citb/psdas/co...02007-1-02.pdf
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Old June 21st, 2011, 04:40 PM   #19
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Are there any tourist passes for Seoul metros? Like 3 or 7-days pass?
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Old June 21st, 2011, 06:50 PM   #20
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Please try to answer the questions written of number 13 forum
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