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Old December 16th, 2010, 10:03 AM   #1261
SeanT
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I´ve just filled up the car on an unmanned gas station 95 DKK 10,71/L
1.428/L
Actually, it was cheaper than the other days, where the price was around 1.513/L
...and snowing again.
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Old December 16th, 2010, 04:52 PM   #1262
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScraperDude View Post
I have this discussion all too often in regards to fuel tax/infrastructure. Everyone bitches about the roads falling apart and bridges too yet they don't want to pay more taxes.
It seems most Americans want to pay the same price for things and not take into consideration cost of materials/labor increases. I'm all for .20 or even .50 increase per gallon if it means smooth roads, no potholes and better lane markings. The cost to replace struts/shocks/tires etc due to shitty roads far exceed any increase of tax I would have to pay.
I hit a pothole on a bridge last winter and the concrete edges of the pothole were so sharp they CUT a huge chunk out of one of my back tires. I had to replace that day immediatly. I have a BMW and the tires are low profile which means it cost me after tax labor and replacement almost $300. I'm sure I wasn't the only victim as this was on the Outerbelt I-270
I'm not denying that infrastructure costs money and that we need to be paying for it. But we have a national allergy to taxes that's on the point of pushing us into third-world status. My point isn't about not wanting to pay more taxes; it's about whom the tax burden falls on. Increasing the gas tax significantly at the same time that we're extending tax breaks for the wealthy is, in my opinion, unfair, because it puts the burden on people who are just getting by. In a way, that $300 you had to pay on no notice - and a lot of people wouldn't have been able to (there are days that I, for example, don't have an extra $300 sitting around) - is another example of what I'm talking about. If we had a level of taxation appropriate to the country we're trying to be (the country we used to be, the countries we think of as our equals....) that pothole might not have been there. And instead of random people having to pay for car repairs that some of them may have trouble paying for, we'd have society as a whole having paid to keep the road in better shape. Of course, the pothole could just be what comes of being in Ohio in the winter....

Note that "significantly," however. A small increase in the gas tax would probably be relatively painless, and appropriate for other reasons. And if we're serious about developing a more balanced transportation system (I'm talking for example about the type of trains and urban transit that European countries take for granted) because it helps the environment and makes us less dependent on foreign oil, a law providing that the gas tax goes up ten cents a year over ten years or something like that might do the trick while still letting people get used to it rather than take a hit all at once.

It woud also make Americans less annoying on forums like this. :-) Certainly, Canadians and Europeans can manage paying gas prices far higher than ours. But you can't just do something like that in one shot without causing hardship, because people have budgets they'd need to adjust. And politically, a ten-cent-a-year-over-ten-years plan would be a very tough sell, if it's possible at all.
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Old December 16th, 2010, 05:24 PM   #1263
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penn's Woods View Post
I'm not denying that infrastructure costs money and that we need to be paying for it. But we have a national allergy to taxes that's on the point of pushing us into third-world status. My point isn't about not wanting to pay more taxes; it's about whom the tax burden falls on. Increasing the gas tax significantly at the same time that we're extending tax breaks for the wealthy is, in my opinion, unfair, because it puts the burden on people who are just getting by. In a way, that $300 you had to pay on no notice - and a lot of people wouldn't have been able to (there are days that I, for example, don't have an extra $300 sitting around) - is another example of what I'm talking about. If we had a level of taxation appropriate to the country we're trying to be (the country we used to be, the countries we think of as our equals....) that pothole might not have been there. And instead of random people having to pay for car repairs that some of them may have trouble paying for, we'd have society as a whole having paid to keep the road in better shape. Of course, the pothole could just be what comes of being in Ohio in the winter....

Note that "significantly," however. A small increase in the gas tax would probably be relatively painless, and appropriate for other reasons. And if we're serious about developing a more balanced transportation system (I'm talking for example about the type of trains and urban transit that European countries take for granted) because it helps the environment and makes us less dependent on foreign oil, a law providing that the gas tax goes up ten cents a year over ten years or something like that might do the trick while still letting people get used to it rather than take a hit all at once.

It woud also make Americans less annoying on forums like this. :-) Certainly, Canadians and Europeans can manage paying gas prices far higher than ours. But you can't just do something like that in one shot without causing hardship, because people have budgets they'd need to adjust. And politically, a ten-cent-a-year-over-ten-years plan would be a very tough sell, if it's possible at all.
Potholes are just a part of winter in Ohio, but the ODOT does patchwork and the plows shred those easily resulting in more potholes.
I wouldn't want an extreme jump in fuel tax either but a gradual increase would allow some to adjust their fuel budget as you were pointing out.
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Old December 16th, 2010, 07:58 PM   #1264
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Prices are getting crazy... Today in Huesca:
Diesel: €1.155/l ($5.769/gal)
95 unleaded: €1.225/l ($6.118/gal)
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Old December 16th, 2010, 08:34 PM   #1265
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HR

ES95 1,21€/l
SP98 1,24€/l
Diesel 1,13€/l

considering falling value of our currency, it is actually more expensive
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Old December 16th, 2010, 08:42 PM   #1266
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trilesy View Post
Every time I see these crazy prices in Europe I just can't imagine myself paying so much for gas (unless you're really wealthy). $3/gal (in the U.S.) and $8/gal (in Europe) - that's just not right!

No wonder they use 1.4 L engines in most cars in Europe.
I think the average here in the UK is 1.6l, and really that is plenty for most people, a typical modern 1.6l car can easily exceed the highest speed limits, overtake with no problems, tow a caravan etc.

Unless you tow monster trucks or carry large quantities or concrete its not necessary to put a 4l V8 in a typical car.

Plus Europeans tend to drive somewhat shorter distances I think, cities are more compact for day to day living and cities are nearer to each other for longer trips. Also more people use public transport only, though most still use cars.

If fuel is 125-175% more expensive per litre the typical European probably only spends 50-75% more total on fuel I would estimate.

Some taxes are much much higher in the US remember, local property taxes for example and car/home insurance is much more too I think.

Anyway, prices are close to record levels here, the best for 95 locally is £1.179 / €1.39 per litre, $7 per US gallon.
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Old December 16th, 2010, 08:45 PM   #1267
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Americans still think in terms of 3 - 5 L engines to get anything moving. You don't need that, for regular freeway / urban commuting anything from 1.6 - 2.0 L turbodiesel is enough. With 2.5 L you have a large engine in European terms. You can easily tow 1500 kg trailers with that.
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Old December 16th, 2010, 09:08 PM   #1268
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Fuel price in Philippines

Man I miss these kinds of fuel pricing:


That was back in April 2004

Times really have changed

Btw
Shell Philippines might launch V-Power 99 octane (or 100 octane) to counter the competition and appeal to sports and racing enthusiasts and those with high-performance autos.

But I think the highest octane rating is V Power by Shell Hong Kong which is reported to have 107 OCTANE (using RON/Research Octane Number method)

P.S.
Here's the fuel prices of Shell in Hong Kong (as of December 7th, 2010)

Shell Hong Kong

PUMP PRICE HK$ / LITRE

Shell Diesel HKD$10.32
Shell FuelSave HKD$15.13 (Inc. Government Excise Duty 6.06)
Shell V Power HKD$16.07 (Inc. Government Excise Duty 6.06)
* Effective on December 7, 2010

http://www.shell.com.hk/home/content...s/price_board/

So that's
Shell Diesel - HKD$10.32 (or 1.00331 €/Liter)
Shell FuelSave - HKD$15.13 (or 1.47114 €/Liter)
Shell V Power - HKD$16.07 (or 1.56254 €/Liter)

I'm guessing the average so far for Shell Hong Kong current fuel prices is around 7 American Dollars per gallon
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Old December 16th, 2010, 09:21 PM   #1269
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
But I think the highest octane rating is V Power by Shell Hong Kong which is reported to have 107 OCTANE (using RON/Research Octane Number method)
107 octane? I though the maximum was 100 octane, like %...
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Old December 16th, 2010, 09:51 PM   #1270
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CNGL View Post
107 octane? I though the maximum was 100 octane, like %...
Well those were the *reports* (can't confirm it though). But if true that it is 107 Octane, then that means that the V Power fuel is given additives or any of them performance enhancers to boost the octane rating (i.e. somewhat like steroids).

Oh and I doubt they'd use ethanol to boost octane.

Come to think of it though, it may seem possible (cause British Petroluem/BP got as high as 102 octane using additives/enhancers)

Anyways, that's just what has been posted. You can ask the HK peeps for more info on that.

--
Anyways for comparison, here were the fuel prices for Caltex in Hong Kong (December 2009)

Location: Caltex Hong Kong fuel station @ Hennessy Road in Wan Chai





That's a big difference IMHO.....
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Old December 17th, 2010, 02:21 AM   #1271
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2.85$ per American gallon of 92 as of today in New Jersey
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Old December 17th, 2010, 05:50 AM   #1272
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Bangkok Thailand

Diesel: €0.75/l
Gasohol 95-E-10: €0.85/l
ULG 95 : €1.08/l
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Old December 17th, 2010, 10:30 AM   #1273
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SWEDEN: 95 Octane

Cheapest petrol 1,32 €

Most expensive 1,45 €
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 03:55 AM   #1274
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Today filled up in Cincinnati at $3.05/gal, another jump from last week's $2.99/gal.

I drove from D.C. to Cincinnati today and was surprised that prices on the East Coast are exactly the same as here in Ohio right now. They are usually higher over there.
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 01:30 PM   #1275
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Reached 4TL (~€2) in here.
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 05:25 PM   #1276
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Prices in Moldova
1 Dollar= 12.11 Moldavian lei (23/12/2010)
1 Euro = 15.92 Moldavian lei (23/12/2010)
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Old December 24th, 2010, 10:44 AM   #1277
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Americans still think in terms of 3 - 5 L engines to get anything moving. You don't need that, for regular freeway / urban commuting anything from 1.6 - 2.0 L turbodiesel is enough. With 2.5 L you have a large engine in European terms. You can easily tow 1500 kg trailers with that.
Having driven both sticks and auto transmission cars, I can understand why Americans need big engines. I just came back to Pakistan and my 1.3l manual felt much more powerful than my 2.3l auto that I drove in the US. Whenever I'm driving in the US, I wish I at least had a 4l car. And you generally drive much slower there than in here (speed limits and all) and there's not much need for sudden acceleration.
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Old December 26th, 2010, 04:35 AM   #1278
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Originally Posted by Triple C View Post
Reached 4TL (~€2) in here.
That is insanely high.
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Old December 26th, 2010, 06:19 PM   #1279
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2/3 of this goes to taxes where I don't exactly know.
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Old December 26th, 2010, 08:49 PM   #1280
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Today in Suwalki (Poland) on cheapest station in the city was:
95 - 4,97zł/L(~1,25€/L)
98 - 5,07zł/L(~1,28€/L)
LPG - 2,37zł/L(~0,59€/L)
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