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Old October 5th, 2008, 10:38 PM   #1
jayo
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LONDON | Low Rise Projects & Construction



London Projects and construction.


I thought I’d make a thread about some non high-rise projects going on at the moment in London which aren’t mentioned in will fox’s thread. Note that all the little snippets of information are taken either from articles or the architects website. Credit to will fox,Manuel,fitz,El Greco,DarJoLe
for there posts which i have got information from.


Mid rise.(anything from 50-120 metres or so)

30 Old Bailey North-(MAKE)
Proposed

http://skyscrapernews.com/news.php?ref=948

Just when you thought architecture firm, MAKE, couldn't come up with anything more outlandish than the likes of the Cube, Vortex and Kite Tower they do it again, this time in the heart of London on a project called 30 The Old Bailey.

The curvaceous scheme being developed by Land Securities features two buildings, one occupying the north section of the site and the other occupying the southern area that together will cover a whole city block. This area currently has on it Export House, Seacoal House, and Hillgate House.

The North building will have 27,170 square metres of office space and the South will have 17,262 square metres representing a total uplift in available space for the site of 12,530 square metres on what is currently being offered. They will both be a maximum of nine storeys and a total of 41.72 metres tall above ground level which is less than the highest current building on the plot.



Hampton House redevelopment(Foster + partners)
Approved.

http://skyscrapernews.com/news.php?ref=1377

Three Norman Foster designed mixed used towers set for the on the Albert Embankment in London have been approved by local council, Lambeth.

With the tallest rising to 85 metres and 27 floors, surrounded by two shorter buildings at 75.85 metres and 24 floors, and 40.05 metres and 13 floors respectively, they will replace the existing sixties block, Hampton House.

The scheme contains a 167 room hotel, 242 residential units, 77 of which will be affordable, and ground floor retail. There will be public landscaping around the bases of the buildings aimed at improving the ground level and breathing life into what is currently a site dominated by a sixties office building.

Fosters massed the size of the buildings to relate in terms of scale and step up from the shorter neighbouring buildings either side with the tallest tower in the middle.

The proximity to the Palace of Westminster has not been an issue in this case as although the views of the world heritage site are protected from Parliament Hill, the project has been designed so that the tallest elements will line behind the Victoria Tower and be hidden from view.

This whole area of London has proven hugely popular with buyers, something that developer, Newlands Enterprises, hopes to cash in on. Well connected to Vauxhall itself and with good views of the River Thames and the Palace of Westminster from the upper floors that will fetch a premium.





The can of ham(So called [Foggo Architects])
Proposed.


Developers are Target follow & Architects are Foggo associates.

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The Walbrook(Foster & Partners)
Under construction.

The Walbrook construction is occupying 1.6 acres of land which will eventually become a mixed use office and retail development in London’s city centre. When complete, The Walbrook will provide a gross area of 600,000 sq.ft, including 410,000 sq.ft of Grade A net letable area and 35,000 sq.ft of retail and restaurant accommodation. But it is not the project’s scale which makes it remarkable, rather the materials used.
Similar to many buildings, the exterior of The Walbrook will be encased with solar shading which will help keep the building cool in the summer and warm in the winter, thus improving energy efficiency. But the cladding on this development is entirely comprised of a Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) with an automotive finish – making the sheen resemble that of a car. FRPs are commonly used in the aerospace, automotive and marine industries because of their enhanced strength and low-weight, boasting a strength to weight ratio higher than steel or concrete. FRPs have also been used in bridge construction but have not been used to this extent on buildings before.
The Walbrook, designed by Foster + Partners for clients Minerva, is currently under construction in between Bank and Cannon Street stations. Skanska, Arup and Roger Preston & Partners will combine efforts on the construction and engineering and hope to complete the project by the end of 2009 making a high-tech 50 metre long impact along Cannon Street.



Walbrook square(Foster & Partners)
Approved


Legal & General has today submitted plans for a striking new office and retail development, to be known as ‘Walbrook Square’. The development will replace its existing buildings at Bucklersbury House, EC4. The project incorporates approximately 1 million sq ft net floorspace on the 3.7 acre site, with 95,000 sq ft of retail and restaurant floorspace and 875,000 sq ft of office space.





100 Middlesex street.(TP Bennett Architects)
http://skyscrapernews.com/news.php?ref=588
Under construction.

A revised planning application has gone in that substantially changes the development plans for the Rodwell House site on the eastern edge of the City of London fringe.

Currently the plot at 100 Middlesex Street has a landmark 112 metre tall office building approved for it that would contain 30,000 square metres of space of 25 floors and has been designed by ORMS Architecture Design.

Dumping the main use of the building the developer now aims at the much easier to accommodate student market with only a minority of office space in the new scheme that will be a series of buildings, the tallest will rise to 105m and 34 floors.

The large difference between the number of floors on this new design and the old one compared to little change in height is caused by the lower floor to ceiling heights that residential housing requires compared to office space, thanks in part to shallower floors that don't have the need to carry the complex electronics and power uses that a top spec office block requires.

ORMS have been replaced by TP Bennett Architects but much of the design ethos remains and the new building does resemble the old ones. Main changes have included reducing the width of the building by 20% increasing the slender profile of the tower, the removal of the dominant spire for something less obtrusive, and changes to the surrounding lower buildings.

Design features include a central vertical spine emphasising height, a skirt that shows off random cladding that gently ripples, and a framing anchor displaying what the architects hope is a calm façade. The dominant colours will be light blue and silver.

The make up of the development now consists of 32,458 square metres of space for student living (1200 rooms in a mixture of different layouts), 772 sq m of residential (10 private 1 and 2 bedroom flats), and 9,011 sq m of offices of B1 use. There will be a mixture of retail and leisure uses for the lower levels along with basement parking. There will be separate entrances on different streets the building bounds on to for each use.

Private student accommodation has a proven a big hit for many investors in recent years as expansion of the higher education market continues and universities become increasingly reluctant to build their own centrally managed halls off campus due to the high amounts of initial capital needed.

This has left a big gap in the market that forwards looking businesses have been filling with some measure of success, not least because the returns are pretty much guaranteed.

If the project gets the go-ahead, which is the likely scenario given there is already a similar sized building approved for the site, construction is likely to begin in 2007 as there is no need to seek a large office pre-let.



Trinity EC3(Foreign office architects)
Approved


The Beetham Organization is to submit a planning application this week for Trinity, a 1m sq ft (92,920 sq m) office campus in Aldgate on the eastern fringe of the City of London.

The Foreign Office Architects-designed scheme, exclusively revealed to Property Week, envisages three multi-faceted office buildings with walls that glint like gemstones. Its estimated completion value is £700m.

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Small projects.

North London cultural centre(Mangera Yvars Architects)
Approved


North London Cultural Centre is a mixed use scheme which accommodates a basement level sports hall, cultural and community spaces at ground level, a children’s play centre, residential accommodation, a nursing home and dining facilities. The success of the project is determined in part by the interstitial spaces which link these various activities.
The curvilinear form of the building mediates the urban and suburban setting of the scheme and inviting passers by into the building.




Maritime Museum extension Greenwich.(C F Moller.)
Proposed.


The South West Wing project encompasses the creation of a new wing for the National Maritime Museum housing a large special exhibitions gallery, a new south entrance, and the creation of an archive with associated learning and research facilities as befitting the world’s foremost maritime archive collection.
The new special exhibitions gallery will allow the display of more collections than ever before, exciting new audiences with the sea and its role in our history, our lives today, and our future. A new architectural entrance will provide major visitor access for the first time from Greenwich Royal Park and from the world famous Royal Observatory.
This is a landmark project that will open up and reveal for everyone the fascinating stories of people and the sea.

1) Due for completion in time for the 2012 Olympics, museum chiefs hope the project will breathe new life into the Greenwich institution.
2)Will cost £35 million.
3)The development has been made possible by a £20 million gift from Israeli shipping magnate Sammy Ofer.
4)The centrepiece of the new wing - to be named in his honour - will be an 800 square metre exhibition space.

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Newhall scheme(Alison Brooks Architects)
Status unknown.


Alison Brooks Architects has unveiled a new residential development on the outskirts of Harlow in Essex for homebuilder Linden Homes.

The Newhall scheme, which is on site, includes 85 homes, ranging from one-bedroom apartments to four-bedroom detached villas.





Oxford street scheme(Future systems architects)
Under construction.


The brief was to transform the quality and appearance of a tired 1960’s building at the undeveloped end of Oxford Street. Our proposal removes the brick and glass façade and replaces it with a subtle yet vibrant jewel-like glass frontage that delicately unifies the lower ground and first floor retail units with the office space above. Through the repetition of crystal-like glass bays, a sense of scale and rhythm is created that reflects the grain of the adjacent properties as well as giving the offices panoramic views along Oxford Street. At night the façade will be illuminated from inside giving off a subtle coloured glow.



Eveline Lowe Primary school(HKR architects)
Approved.


Planners give go-ahead for Eveline Lowe Primary school in Southwark

HKR Architects has been given the go-ahead by planners for Eveline Lowe Primary School in the London Borough of Southwark.



General Gordon Square and Beresford Square Woolwich.(Gustafson Porter Architects)
Status unknown.


Greenwich council names Diana fountain architect as winner of competition to redesign General Gordon Square and Beresford Square

Landscape architect Gustafson Porter, which designed the Diana Memorial water feature in Hyde Park, is to redesign two squares in central Woolwich as part of Greenwich council's regeneration of the town.

The design for General Gordon Square will centre around a paddling area - as did the Diana Memorial until a series of safety incidents meant that paddling had to be banned.



St Nicholas Cole Church, the city of London.
Proposed.


The Centre's work and activities will reach out, to benefit children and teachers nationwide. Its resources will be web networked to all schools through its associated REonline.
The Centre will:
Provide RE with a national physical focus easily accessible in the heart of the capital.
Be the home base for the Religious Education Council.
Provide office space for related RE organisations.
Host national and regional
meetings, lectures and seminars.
Be a religious trail focus for school parties and tourists.
Offer professional development for RE teachers.
Provide on-line and other resources.
Offer exhibition space.
Provide café restaurant facilities and an outdoor terrace.
Enable public access to the inside of a Wren building currently closed.
Relate RE to Heritage Education.



Barnet College campus.(RMJM Architects)
Status unknown.


The campus, in Colindale, will provide accommodation for a host of vocational courses including hair and beauty salons, hospitality training suites and a new restaurant.

The school will become a central hub for the area, which has been earmarked by Mayor of London Boris Johnson as an 'opportunity area' and will see more than 10,000 new homes built in the coming years.
RMJM director Matt Cartwright, who is leading the design team, said: 'The new campus is an important milestone for the college and for the local community – it will lead the way in transforming Colindale.

'Urban regeneration must start at a community level and this new campus aims to deliver outstanding community facilities as well as its all-important education function.'





St Martin in the fields Renovation.(Robert Kennett and Eric Parry architects)
Under construction.


One of Britain's best-known churches will announce today one of the most expensive regeneration projects ever proposed for an ecclesiastical building.
The £34m scheme at the church of St Martin-in-the-fields, on Trafalgar Square in London, will be inaugurated by Prince Charles.
He has agreed to be patron of the two-year programme under which the 280-year-old church will be renovated. There will be new accommodation in its vaults for its musicians, its itinerant population of homeless people, and the local Chinese community centre.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2004/ma...mmunities.arts



Rochester row(Assael Architects)
Proposed


One of the most unpleasant pieces of sixties architecture standing near Victoria Station could soon have an intimate meeting with a wrecking ball if the Notting Hill House Association and Barratt West London get their way.

Located on Rochester Row, the narrow site is bounded by Greencoat Place to the north west and Greycoat Place to the north east and is less than 300 metres from the prime business and government centre of Victoria Street.



The proposals by Assael Architecture feature knocking down the existing office building and multi-storey car park on the site and replacing them with an interlinked couple of buildings, one residential and the other office, each with their own entrances.

The building will have its frontage framed using traditional Portland Stone with aluminium panels in between that will have patterning on them. Dreamed up by artist Oliver Marsden, combined together these will form a series of circles radiating out from a central spot rather like the concentric circles you see in a raindrops ripple.

Containing 38 private and 17 social apartments, the zinc clad penthouses will be located in a smaller stepped back two storey section surrounded by roof gardens creating a green living environment in the middle of a city for those who can afford it. They will also be able to enjoy some uninterrupted views over Westminster.




River lea regenerating scheme(5th Studio Architects)
Proposed.


5th Studio’s transformation of the River Lea Valley goes with the flow
11 July 2008
bdonline.co.uk
By Ellis Woodman

Industrial infrastructure and open spaces along east London’s River Lea will form the spine of a design framework devised by architect 5th Studio for the area’s transformation into dynamic parkland

Emerging from the ground just to the west of Luton, the River Lea tracks a 68km journey through the wilds of Essex and east London, feeding finally into the Thames at Canning Town, opposite the Millennium Dome. It has represented an important boundary at least since Roman times, providing an edge to Danelaw, and more recently dividing the counties of Essex and Middlesex and the London boroughs of Newham and Tower Hamlets. Thanks to Abercrombie’s 1944 London Regional Plan, the land that borders its final 26km is mostly parkland — the largest open space in London.

But while its upper reaches are spectacularly bucolic — a haven for horse riders, cyclists, bird watchers, and anglers — the Lea remains a working river, which is hemmed in by industrial use for its final meandering 3km through the area known as the Lower Lea Valley. It is also cut across by heavily trafficked roads, by trains heading east from Liverpool Street and Fenchurch Street stations, and by those of the Docklands Light Railway. Anyone hoping to walk from the north end of the park to the Thames needs to be both determined and fearless.



By 2020, the journey should be considerably easier. That is the anticipated completion date of an epic programme of works to open the Lower Lea Valley to much greater public use. At present, the project takes the form of a design framework that has been developed by 5th Studio, working with the German landscape architect Latz & Partners. Recently published, it sets in place a vision that will guide a series of competitions and direct commissions over the next 12 years.



The impetus for change has come from transformations that are already under way. Towards the northern end of the site, the 2012 Olympic Park is being constructed, a wholesale piece of urban restructuring that has seen the demolition of a large number of light industrial buildings. The framework aims to identify how this new public resource can be integrated into Abercrombie’s larger scheme, and also how the valley as a whole might enjoy a more expansive interface with the Thames.

The strategy proposed for achieving these ends is very different from the “slash and burn” approach adopted by the designers of the Olympic Park. A limited amount of compulsory land purchase may be undertaken, but the intention is that much of what is already in place will stay. Given that the landscape is characterised by such operations as builders’ merchants, waste recycling facilities, and factories producing fast food, it is clear that this will be a very different park to any that yet exists in Britain.



“It is understood that objects of industry can bring character and animation to spaces of recreation”

Where it does find some parallel is in a park realised by Latz & Partners during the nineties outside the German city of Duisburg. Landschaftspark Duisburg-Nord occupies a 200ha site, a large part of which was formerly a coal and steel production plant. Rather than wiping away the traces of these activities, the practice reframed the enormous buildings and machines that remained through a series of discrete landscape interventions and by introducing a range of cultural and leisure uses. The park’s character might be thought of as a post-industrial variant on 18th century notions of the sublime. The formula has proved wildly successful, attracting half a million visitors each year to a landscape previously given scant regard.



In contrast, the Lower Lea Valley is still very much a working environment, and the plan aims to maintain it as such. In common with Duisburg-Nord, the scheme demonstrates an understanding that the objects of industry — whether they be buildings, infrastructural elements or piles of waste waiting to be shipped off to foreign climes — can bring character and animation to spaces of recreation. The two schemes are also alike in that they are collage-like assemblies of distinct environments — a very different sensibility from the ambition evident in the renderings of the Olympic Park, where landscape and buildings will be united in a singular expression.

The Lower Lea Valley scheme has been conceived as nine territories, which will be skewered by a new ground surface incorporating a series of bridge links in order to radically improve accessibility. The architects have dubbed this primary element the Fatwalk in recognition of the fact that it constitutes both a route and a place in its own right. Its minimum width has been gauged to accommodate a mix of riders, cyclists and walkers, but at many points it claims a more expansive territory, enabling other activities to take hold.



Among the environments that are envisaged along the way are a forest within which seven listed gasholders form clearings. The retained structures can potentially be given over to new uses, one scenario being that they become London’s equivalent to the Eden Project’s biomes.

Twenty thousand homes are to be built in the area in the next decade — one of the project’s fundamental drivers — and a number of major housing schemes are proposed for sites fronting the Lea. Here, the framework aims to “catch and steer” these developments towards an outcome that contributes to the idea of the park. In particular, it identifies how a language of planting and exposed drainage channels might extend the perception of the park deep into this edge condition. Where there is industry, the impulse has been to encourage building owners to simplify the relationship between public and private space by allowing the Fatwalk to run hard against the walls of their big sheds. Where there is infrastructure, landscape interventions of a comparable scale are proposed.



“A spoil heap set to be created by the construction of Crossrail is reimagined as a faux volcano”

The uncultivated nature of the place is embraced as a quality. In one area termed the Exotic Wild by the architects, the spoil heap set to be produced by the construction of Crossrail is reimagined as a faux volcano. It sits in relation to an artificial cliff that extends out of a wildlife park, consuming the elevated
Docklands Light Railway as it does so. The Tyrannosaurus rex that populates the drawing of this area is, one trusts, no more than indicative.

The area that stands to be transformed most dramatically is the East India Dock Basin, where the Fatwalk meets the Thames. This is a place particularly rich in history, being the point from which the Virginia settlers sailed, and it is also where the East India Company ran its globe-spanning operation. It enjoys an extraordinary position on the river, standing at the head of the meander encompassing Greenwich Reachits present condition suggests nothing of that significance. There is a nature reserve here but, cut off from the surrounding fabric by road and railway, it is barely used.

The proposed scheme resolves the access issues and populates the now disused basin with a floating lido and platforms that will offer wildlife different types of habitat. On land, there is to be a café, alongside which an orchard will be established, a memory of a feature which stood here in the 18th century. A river boat connection is proposed, as well as facilities to buy a picnic and hire a bike — or even a horse.

Through these interventions, the place promises to fulfil its role as a gateway to the park and also provide one of those rare points in London — like Parliament Hill, Primrose Hill or Greenwich Park — which affords an understanding of a city-wide scale.

The serpentine pavilion(Frank Gehry architects)
Complete.


The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2008, which gives England the first built project by legendary architect Frank Gehry, is now open to the public. The spectacular structure – designed and engineered in collaboration with Arup – is anchored by four massive steel columns and is comprised of large timber planks and a complex network of overlapping glass planes that create a dramatic, multi-dimensional space. Gehry and his team took inspiration for this year’s Pavilion from a fascinating variety of sources including the elaborate wooden catapults designed by Leonardo da Vinci as well as the striped walls of summer beach huts. Part-amphitheatre, part-promenade, these seemingly random elements make a transformative place for reflection and relaxation by day, and discussion and performance by night.



The Tate extension.(Herzog & de Meuron)
Proposed.


Hulking behind the Tate Modern in London like a Jawan sandcrawler about to nab priceless art is the latest redesign from the pens of Herzog & de Meuron of the gallery's planned extension.

The proposals also take advantage of three major unused oil tanks below by turning them into additional exhibition space and creating the lower three floors of what will be an eleven story scheme that rises to 65 metres in height above ground.

Linking the whole thing together will be what is described as a "ceremonial route", a staircase that winds its way from the bottom to the top.

Although they have retained the basic massing of the previous proposals that's where the similarity ends. Those were a stack of translucent glass blocks but this time Herzog & de Meuron have turned to the inspiration of the original Giles Gilbert Scott designed power station that is now the Tate Modern and adopted brick.



10 Lime street.(Rolfe Judd architects)
Under construction .


Rising in the heart of the City of London, just metres from its famous neighbour the Lloyds Building, is 10 Lime Street.

This is a new largely office development that also features two ground floor retail units, one sandwiched either side of the reception area aimed at becoming prime shopping space.

Rising above this are seven floors of office space with floor plates up to 677 square metres each. In all there will be 4,089 square metres of office space and 1,012 square metres of retail. Topping 10 Lime Street is a plant floor.



Grosvernor waterside.(MAKE)
Under construction


Rising now in west London is one of the most luxurious residential developments currently under construction.

It's been developed by St James Homes Ltd and pitched clearly at the upper end of the market. This portion of the project sees 103 private apartments and 196 affordable units built in two blocks joined together by a shared ground level podium that rise to ten and twelve floors respectively.

They have been designed by Make Architects who have come up with a distinctive design for the front of the shorter building, Brammah, that at first looks unique with recessed vertical and horizontal slots shaped like tetris tiles standing behind aluminium panels.

There is however a striking resemblance between this patterning and the Hallfield Estate in Bayswater, a now restored council block, but Make have always been a lover of modernism aiming simply to put a high-tech futuristic tilt on it.

Patterning another layer on the aluminium cladding is a piece of public art by Clare Woods who has turned it into a massive canvas with an etched piece aimed at resembling the sunlight that would project through the trees before the site was cleared for development. With branches and shadows outlined although we can't help but think of the silhouette of some scary monster creeping onto the building.

Both buildings are orientated to enjoy maximum views of the nearby River Thames with the shorter one lining the dockside at ground level with a double height colonnaded lower floor that will contain several restaurant or retail outlets.

Green features include rainwater collection to keep the green spaces fertile and CHP plant giving supplementary power to the buildings.

Three blocks are already finished on Grosvenor Waterside and construction is well underway on Brammah. Completion of it should conclude in 2009.



Adelphi point(Parritt Leng architects.)
Status unknown.








London based developer Investland has been given the go ahead to start work on its planned project for Edmonton, Adelphi Point.

Yet to enjoy the growth other fringe parts of the capital are currently experiencing the scheme promises to be the starting point for rejuvenation of the area that is located in the London Borough of Enfield.

Sited on an old petrol station on Fore Street the development, which has been described by local planners as a "strong landmark" comes from the drawing board of Parritt Leng architects. The project will play host to 520 square metres of A1 commercial space located at ground level along with 24 apartments.

It will feature a 29.5 metre, nine-storey tower attached to a three storey base. The lower level of the project will have glass facades whilst part of the tower and the upper level of the base is dominated by vertical fins running up the remainder of it giving the building a distinctive and striking appearance.

With sustainable being the first word on peoples lips these days the project will not disappoint the greenies, natural ventilation and insulation is built in to lower the buildings energy demands and solar panels to heat water for the building are incorporated into the roof.

As London's commuter belt widens, Edmonton's close proximity and good transport links means that the area is now predicted to become one of the next big locations to be swarmed on by city workers who either just manage not to earn enough to live in the capital or wish to go home to somewhere a little less hectic.

Work should start on the site very soon although as of yet no completion date has been given but it shouldn't be long before Edmonton can start to enjoy its latest landmark.

Olympic Swimming pool(Zaha hadid architects)
Under construction










The UK’s Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) has reported that Zaha’s Aquatic Centre will now cost £210 million GBP, three times the original budget of £75 million. Part of the overrun is due to the UK’s VAT tax but moulded components in Zaha’s sweeping roof and expensive glass panels have been blamed as well. The roof is expected to cost £60 million alone.

Tower 42 extension(Studio Egret West)
Proposed.


Tower 42 could be set for a make-over if new plans by joint owners, Hermes and Black Rock are realised.

Faced with the growing competition as one of the only skyscrapers in the City of London from a whole host of new towers such as 122 Leadenhall and the Bishopsgate Tower that offer much more by the way of square metres.

Their solution to responding to these rival developments is to radically rebuild the glass podium that connects the tower to Old Broad Street by creating a glass honeycomb of offices in it’s place that will rise up to eleven floors tall designed by Studio Egret West.

The existing pin-striped glass and stainless steel main structure of the skyscraper will remain intact but the new development will total about 25,000 square metres, a net increase of 11,000 on what is presently there.

Many improvements are also planned to the current public realm at the base of the tower which is dominated by a labyrinth of raised passages making existing pedestrian access through the site a confusing experience. These will be removed with new links through the site built in their place.

Development of the site is complicated by some of the lower-rise historic Gibson Banking Hall next to the skyscraper that dictated the originally cantilevered nature of the Natwest Tower when it was originally built in the 1970s.

There is also the issue of existing tenancies such as the Royal Bank of Scotland which the developers hope can be persuaded to surrender its lease before the end of the year so that work can begin. 20 and 30 Old Broad Street are also up for development as part of the scheme meaning it will have to be phased in over ten years.

Hermes and Black Rock are aiming for beginning consultations with the planning department at the City of London on how to proceed this summer.



Fore street Telephone exchange site.(HKR architects)

Telereal's £74 million development in the City of London to replace the Fore Street Telephone Exchange has been given the thumbs up by the local council.

Sandwiched on a plot near Moorgate Station between Moorhouse, Citypoint and the Barbican, the 56 metre tall office development will have 13 floors above ground and 56,000 square metres of which 31,800 will be grade A commercial space.

It's been designed by architects HKR, who have come up with a large rectangular block with easily configurable regular floor-plates that can offer the maximum amount of space per floor.

The roof line dominated by an angled top that will allow the office occupiers to have roof gardens on no less than six different levels creating a relatively large amount of outdoor space to be enjoyed. This is a solution that means that different tenants on each of the top floors can have their own private space rather than share with other companies.

At ground level ringing the outside, V columns are noticeable. Their purpose is not purely a solid decorative contrast to the glass of the ground level as the Cross rail tunnel will cut under the site.

Rather than dig exceptionally deep foundations, as with the nearby Moorhouse that manages to reach 57 metres below ground, these columns will help cantilever the building weight away from the centre of the plot and on to the edge of the site.





Monument offices(MAKE)
Approved.

Make Architects' striking new Monument offices granted consent

A stunning new addition to the City of London’s office market is set for development, with the granting of planning consent for a new, 90,000 sq ft building at Monument. The City of London granted consent today for the striking, 10-storey building. Designed by architects Make, the development will be taken forward by a joint venture between The Carlyle Group and Bellhouse Joseph. Suitable as a prestigious HQ address, or for multiple-occupancy, the crystalline structure will be based in the square in which Monument stands.





Tooley street(Couldn’t find the architect)
Under construction.

Tooley Street.U/C.
Cafes&Offices.Due for completion May 2008.





Fleetbank House(CF Moeller)
Proposed.

http://skyscrapernews.com/news.php?ref=1132

CF Moeller has designed this new office building for developer Land Securities in the heart of the City of London.

With 13 storeys including ground and a plant floor on the top, the scheme will be 53 metres tall and contain 40,422 square meters of office with ground floor retail.

Located to the south of Fleet Street and the immediate west of Salisbury Square, it replaces the present Fleetbank House, a sixties office block, 43 metres tall that currently dominates the site. Other buildings will also go including the Coach and Horses, a 19th century public house, and Chronicle House which fronts straight on to Fleet Street and will have its façade retained.









1 New Change(Jean nouvel)

From Evening Standard

A mall for St Paul's
By Luke Leitch, Evening Standard
6 June 2005

A multi-million pound shopping centre and office complex is to be built in the shadow of St Paul's Cathedral.

The Corporation of London is processing a planning application for the £200million One New Change development, which has been designed by French architect Jean Nouvel.

Developer Land Securities describes the building as: "A new 220,000sqft retail destination over three floors, making it one of the largest consolidated retail spaces across central London.

"The development will also comprise approximately 340,000sqft of premier office accommodation."

The building will be in one of the most architecturally sensitive locations London has to offer - beside the east transept of Sir Christopher Wren's 17th-century masterpiece. However, its architect insists that the complex will "set up a dialogue" with the cathedral, not impose upon it.

The Dean and Chapter of St Paul's, the Greater London Authority and the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment are all understood to have approved the design before the application was filed.

Mr Nouvel's glass building will comprise four sections to create new views of the cathedral for shoppers and office workers. A "significant" public artwork will sit at the centre.

The roof, which will include an open-air plaza and a viewing platform, is angled to prevent obstruction of cathedral vistas from other London locations.

Mr Nouvel is an internationally acclaimed architect who has never created a major building in London.

His most recent landmark design is Barcelona's Agbar Tower, which is reminiscent of our own "Gherkin" - the Swiss Re building at 30 St Mary Axe.

Mr Nouvel said: "The design of One New Change is about enriching the City with a new sort of modernity, one that reaches beyond itself to speak, to contemplate and to reveal the diverse character of its surroundings. It is a contemporary building which will set up a dialogue with St Paul's and the neighbouring buildings.

"The proposed design is calm and deferential to St Paul's Cathedral and provides a unique opportunity to bring the public into the site."

The design was chosen through an open architectural competition judged by a panel including Millennium Dome architect Lord Rogers and Architecture Institute director Rowan Moore, the Evening Standard's architecture critic.

If planning permission is granted, the three-acre site's existing red-brick building would be demolished.

[IMG]http://i2.************/rhr60o.jpg[/IMG]







Hope you enjoyed that.

A little list of Approved or U/C projects in the list(s).

10 lime street-U/C.
Hampton house-approved.
The walbrook-U/C.
Walbrook square-Approved.
100 middlesex street-U/C.
Trinity EC3-Approved.
North London cultural centre-Approved.
Newhall scheme-U/C.
Oxford street scheme-U/C.
Eveline lowe school-Approved.
St martin in the fields-Approved.
Grosvernor waterside-U/C.
Olympic swimming pool-U/C.
Monument offices-Approved.
Tooley street-U/C.
1 New Change-U/C.
Beizer-U/C.
Stonebridge Hillside Hub-U/C.
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Last edited by jayo; October 6th, 2008 at 09:30 PM.
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Old October 5th, 2008, 11:57 PM   #2
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Great work! I'll post projects to complement the one you have already shared with us.
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Old October 6th, 2008, 09:28 AM   #3
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Close to St Paul

[IMG]http://i32.************/1jp0yh.jpg[/IMG]

Rothchild HQ (Koolhas)


Energy Station, Stratford, MacAslan and partners


Bezier, Old Street,
[IMG]http://i25.************/2vdqumc.jpg[/IMG]

Heart of East Greenwich, Make


Beadon Roads, Hamiltons Associates, Hammersmith
[IMG]http://i28.************/n5lwg0.jpg[/IMG]

Hoxton Gallery, Zaha Hadid



Mitsui Fudosan Building, Hanover Square,


Dalston Quarter, MacAslan


Grimbsy Street, Michael Trentham
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Old October 6th, 2008, 12:30 PM   #4
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Foster + Partners are really putting their stamp on London.

Many of the smaller designs that are happening within The City are just ugly IMHO. A lot are great, but some really shouldn't be allowed anywhere near the square mile.
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Old October 6th, 2008, 05:58 PM   #5
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Thanks for that manuel.
Oh,you forgot 1 new change.
I add that to the list.
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Old October 6th, 2008, 08:30 PM   #6
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Some great projects here! I only really look at high rise projects on here but some of those are stunning.
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Old October 7th, 2008, 07:28 PM   #7
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Carmine Building, Paddington Basin
Mossessian & Partners


The other buildings of the phased development. Building C, Perkins & Will

Building B, Perkins and Will
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Old October 8th, 2008, 05:18 AM   #8
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any photos of progress then?
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Old October 10th, 2008, 07:21 PM   #9
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I have to live there
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Old October 10th, 2008, 07:36 PM   #10
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I may be biased but mate it is totally amazing in London.
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Old October 10th, 2008, 07:38 PM   #11
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Cool. There's better architectural diversity in the proposed lowrise stuff than the skyscrapers proposed!

Materials use for example - from the Hoxton Gallery to the timber-frame Serpentine thing, to the brick addition to the Tate Modern. Whereas all the skyscrapers proposed for London are entirely glass

Anyway, great lowrise stuff going on. Can't wait to see this stuff finished ?
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Old October 13th, 2008, 03:12 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Texan View Post
any photos of progress then?
London construction threads here:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/forumdisplay.php?f=941
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Old October 14th, 2008, 03:37 AM   #13
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lovely and classy projects
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Old August 11th, 2009, 04:59 PM   #14
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oh crap.. london is booming!!

it must be growing sooo fast.. anyone have population projections (for the metro area, too)?? id love to see them!
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Old August 12th, 2009, 02:11 AM   #15
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at first they projected about 50-60,000 population increase every year, (7.6 million by 2016), but nowadays theyre rethinking it as 80-100,000.


Basically

2001: 7.17 million
2005: 7.52 million
2016: 8.1/ 8.2 million?

The metro will of course be far larger.
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Old August 14th, 2009, 01:19 AM   #16
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Very good.
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Old August 14th, 2009, 03:16 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the spliff fairy View Post
at first they projected about 50-60,000 population increase every year, (7.6 million by 2016), but nowadays theyre rethinking it as 80-100,000.


Basically

2001: 7.17 million
2005: 7.52 million
2016: 8.1/ 8.2 million?

The metro will of course be far larger.
wow, so its growing faster than big brother new york!! thats impressive

maybe in a few years the london metro area would be bigger than that of new yorks! that would surely be amazing..

on wikipedia it says that londons metro area is 12,300,000 to 13,945,000.. thats a bit confusing. could anyone tell me the correct number?

it still has a long way to go before it surpasses new york with about 19 million, but yeah london grew with 53 000 people from august 2008 till july (i think) 2009!
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Old August 14th, 2009, 06:48 AM   #18
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some of these are really nice projects

go London!
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Old August 15th, 2009, 11:15 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City of Rain View Post
wow, so its growing faster than big brother new york!! thats impressive

maybe in a few years the london metro area would be bigger than that of new yorks! that would surely be amazing..

on wikipedia it says that londons metro area is 12,300,000 to 13,945,000.. thats a bit confusing. could anyone tell me the correct number?

it still has a long way to go before it surpasses new york with about 19 million, but yeah london grew with 53 000 people from august 2008 till july (i think) 2009!
The London metro also gets measures as 18 million, in the same size as NYC's.
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Old August 17th, 2009, 11:12 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the spliff fairy View Post
The London metro also gets measures as 18 million, in the same size as NYC's.
No its not.It somewhere between 12 million and 14 million.The 18 million number is probably for the whole of the southeast.
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