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Old September 15th, 2008, 12:46 PM   #61
hkskyline
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Afghanistan's Highway One hijacked by Taliban terror
13 September 2008
Agence France Presse

Most of the 55 passengers packed into the bus are well aware of the dangers that lie ahead in their 450-kilometre (300-mile) journey from the southern city of Kandahar to Kabul.

The atmosphere is tense as they set out on Highway One -- the road between two of Afghanistan's main cities that has been hijacked by extremist Taliban insurgents and bandits who prey on travellers.

None of the passengers, including an AFP reporter, dare wear Western clothes for fear of being singled out, and even killed, for being a "spy" for the international military forces fighting a Taliban-led insurgency here.

This journey can only be undertaken in local dress, with men's beards maintained as a badge of being a true Muslim.

"Whenever I travel on this road, I disguise myself by wearing dirty clothes," said a Kabul telephone engineer currently based in Kandahar who did not want to give his name.

"I stop washing myself several days before I travel."

All traces of links with the government or international groups -- identity badges, numbers on cell phones, sometimes even things that might suggest one is literate -- are removed, with professionals adopting the guise of more humble workers.

Not far out of Kandahar, just outside the town of Qalat, the bus encounters its first roadblock. Nervous passengers are clearly wondering: is this another Taliban attack?

Anxiety mounts as the wait stretches into three hours with no explanation.

Then the bus roars back into life. It takes its visibly frightened passengers past dozens of heavily-armed Western and Afghan soldiers removing a mangled military vehicle.

Later in the day, the NATO-led force headquarters in Kabul announced a bomb had destroyed a military vehicle in that same area, killing a Romanian soldier.

"If I could afford an air ticket, I would never take this road," says another passenger, a spare-parts dealer, who has to travel between the two cities regularly and also would not give his name.

"It's too dangerous. You see Taliban are everywhere here," he says.

But not many Afghan commuters can afford the 110-dollar plane ticket; the eight-dollar bus is the more affordable option. Some even shun private cars for the safety in numbers of a larger vehicle.

The road continues past burnt-out military supply trucks and about 20 bridges that have been destroyed, apparently by insurgents; some of the large ones have been replaced by metal military bridges.

It passes Qalat, where last month a battle erupted on the road when Taliban-linked rebels attacked a NATO supply convoy guarded by private Afghan guards. At least 28 attackers and five guards were killed.

Then the bus rolls into Ghazni, which driver Juma Gul describes as particularly dangerous and where Taliban abducted 23 South Korean missionaries a year ago. Two were shot dead before the remainder were released.

A French businessman was abducted on the Ghazni portion of the highway in May this year and freed after nearly a month. An Afghan official said a ransom was paid to his kidnappers, who were Taliban.

The bus journeys on through Wardak, about 100 kilometres out of Kabul, where a Taliban bomb and rocket attack on the road in June killed three US soldiers.

These are only some of the incidents that stand out in a litany of insurgent attacks on Highway One -- ambushes on police, bombs against soldiers, fuel and logistics trucks up in flames, kidnappings, beheadings and executions.

"It's an organised and deliberate campaign aimed at undermining the government and to show they have a presence," said Afghan defence ministry spokesman General Mohammad Zahir Azimi.

"With one single attack the Taliban gets lots of attention. They know about how many people are travelling on that road."

Highway One is one of the most significant development projects of post-Taliban Afghanistan.

The US government's development agency, USAID, says it spent 190 million dollars building it from a "broken strip" into the highway that was opened in 2003, reducing travel time from two days to about five hours.

But today -- insurgent violence having spiralled in the past few years -- it has become a no-go road for most expatriates and a strategic target.

"Insurgents are adapting their tactics and relying increasingly on asymmetric methods ... most recently, attacks on highway infrastructure," said the spokesman for the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, Canadian Brigadier General Richard Blanchette.

"These tactics have a negative impact on civilian travel and commerce," he told AFP.

Responding to the violence, hundreds of Afghan army and police backed by Western troops have placed troops onto the road in recent months, according to military officials.

And the US-trained Afghan army has established dozens of security posts along the road, Azimi said.

"Since we have moved in, the security is much better," Azimi said.

Extra police had also been sent in, said interior ministry spokesman Zemarai Bashary, adding the portion from Kabul to Wardak was secure.

The growing police forces however still did not have enough men to cover the whole stretch of road, he said, adding, "We are working hard to remove those security problems on the road."
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Old September 17th, 2008, 07:08 PM   #62
DJZG
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are there any pictures or maps on Afghanistan?

i assume, highway is pretty messy there...
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Old September 19th, 2008, 12:11 AM   #63
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lot of them, just search Flickr:
Kandahar city Afghanistan. Road to Kabul
image hosted on flickr

Afghanistan - Off Kabul
image hosted on flickr

image hosted on flickr

image hosted on flickr

road-by-river on the Mah i Par
image hosted on flickr

The Road to Faizabad
image hosted on flickr

ُCentral Afghanistan, Summer of 2005
image hosted on flickr

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Old September 19th, 2008, 12:55 AM   #64
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hm yes, ordinary roads.... i was wondering about highways...
if i find some time, maybe GE can help
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Old October 1st, 2008, 06:38 PM   #65
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National road number systems

I couldn't find a thread which covered this topic, but in light of the fact that we in Norway are about (or not...) to change our road numbers, I'd like to make a tour to see how it's done elsewhere. Feel free to add, correct, comment I'm doing this because I like numbered systems. That is, I like to see the numbers. Numbered routes, numbered exits, good things. But it can be done right, not so right and even horribly wrong...

I'll start with what I like, and move on to what I know: First, I like the E routes, even though I know that quite a few don't. I like them because they promote transnational infrastructure, which is good both for Europe, travellers and the infrastructure itself. I also like a clear national system. Most countries maintain a separate motorway category, which also makes sense if your network is long and complex enough. Regional roads often get more digits, different coloured signs and/or different letters on them. I'll look at a few, and provide a very subjective evaluation of each country (colours are background colours):

Sweden:

Very simple, green E routes seen all over, not combined with national numbers, elsewhere blue 1-, 2- or 3-digit numbers (no letters) for national, interregional and important county roads. Also, the same system includes other county roads, though the roads aren't posted. 1- and 2-digit roads mainly more important than 3-digit, but the national non-E-routes aren't in any particular order.
Advantages: Simple (and that is really important).
Disadvantages: Not always easy to identify trunk routes (compare the 40 and 42, for instance, one is quality, the other isn't...). Key routes in urban areas without numbers. Older alignments (i.e. current emergency, local traffic etc roads without numbers.
Possible improvements: A few more numbered roads. A couple of new E roads would also make sense.

Finland:

E roads, but combined with national numbers. Three different categories: Red signposts, 1 digit, for national roads. Yellow signposts, double digit for other important roads. White, triple digit for local and regional roads.
Advantages: Logical, quite simple, comprehensive.
Disadvantages: Some yellow regional roads seem to be as important as some red roads.
Possible improvements: Not that many, I like the Finnish system.

Denmark:

E roads, no national numbers. Two categories, national roads in yellow (1 or 2 digits) and regional in white (3 digits plus special "ring road" signs).
Advantages: Logical, simple, comprehensive.
Disadvantages: No obvious ones.
Possible improvements: Again, I like the system, not that much to improve. Don't need motorway numbers in such a small country.

The UK:

E roads not posted, M in blue for motorway, green As (1-4 digits) for trunk roads (AX(M) for motorway sections of A roads not deemed fit for a number of its own) and important local, Bs (four digits?) for local. Numbers generally appear at junctions and distance signs, not en route.
Advantages: Logical, simple, comprehensive.
Disadvantages: I'd like to see numbers posted at the roadside on ordinary highways, at least. Personally, I'd like them to put up European numbers as well, but that's never going to happen...
Possible improvements: Numbers en route, please!

Germany:

E roads posted with national numbers and (at least sometimes...) on motorways. Blue 1-3 digit motorway numbers, yellow 1-3 digit national road numbers.
Advantages: Simple, well executed.
Disadvantages: lack of E numbers on some motorways, no obvious logic to national road numbers' current status. A hell of a lot of important roads are not numbered, particularly in cities, but many rural Landesstrassen should also be numbered.
Possible improvements: Abandon local pride and post some more federal numbers along Landesstrassen, please! Also, reinstate numbers throughout the on the "old" roads (B1 tends to disappear and reappear, for instance...). I also think the "Umleitungs" when a piece of Autobahn is closed would go smoother if all parallell roads were numbered.

I'll continue my analysis a wee bit later with the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Spain, the Czech Republic, Austria, Italy, Greece and Romania, incidentally the countries' in which I've done some serious driving... Eventually, I'll also comment a bit on what's happening and/or should happen in Norway.
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Old October 1st, 2008, 10:51 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElviS77 View Post
The UK:E roads not posted, M in blue for motorway,
yep - blue background and white text signs on Motorways.
Quote:
green As (1-4 digits) for trunk roads (AX(M) for motorway sections of A roads not deemed fit for a number of its own) and important local
You understand Ax(M) roads well - they are motorway status (as it's a legal status, not a standard) bits of A roads. However A roads don't all have green signs, and most motorways are trunk.

Trunk/non-trunk is an ownership status - are the national body called the Highways Agency in charge of it, or is it the responsibility of the council. There's nothing really on the roads to help tell you this.
Quote:
Bs (four digits?) for local.

Primary/non-primary is a signage system - important A roads (and one or two other roads), linking important destinations (usually shown in Green outlined Yellow text in Atlases) that aren't motorways, have green signs (white text, yellow road numbers) to suppliment the motorway network - these are primary routes. Other A roads have the normal black text on white signage and are shown on maps as red, rather than primary green.
three or four digits and yellow/orange/brown type colours on maps. I will hasten to point out that A and B are funding matters - A roads get more money than B roads. There's also hidden numbering schemes for each highway authority.
Quote:
Numbers generally appear at junctions and distance signs, not en route.
err, Route Confirmation/Mileage signage is rather common - mostly just after
Quote:
Advantages: Logical, simple, comprehensive.
Disadvantages: I'd like to see numbers posted at the roadside on ordinary highways, at least.
why? we have too much sign clutter anyway. There's a couple of places where it would be good and doesn't have it already, but when you need to know what number road you are on, you will see a sign with it on.
Quote:
Personally, I'd like them to put up European numbers as well, but that's never going to happen...
Quote:
Possible improvements: Numbers en route, please!
already done, as much as necessary.

To add to it, there is a logic to the numbering. The A1-6 radiate out of London, and the A7-9 radiate out of Edinburgh. Numbers from the A1/A900 to the Thames start with 1, the Thames to the A3 with 2, A3 to A4 with 3, A4 to A5 with 4, A5 to A6 with 5, A6 to A7/A1 with 6, A7 to A8 with 8, A8 to A9 with 9 and A9 to the A900 with 9. Numbers can cross into other 'zones', provided they don't cross the Ax road with their starting number.

Motorways work nearly the same, just using the M1, Thames, M3, M4, M5, M6, A7, M8 and M9.
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Old October 1st, 2008, 10:52 PM   #67
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I think there is one such topic... about how roads are signed and stuff like that, highway markers or something
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Old October 2nd, 2008, 01:11 AM   #68
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http://monterie.homestead.com/files/index.htm is a site that deals with pretty much all numbering systems.

I forgot to mention that I only dealt with GB - Northern Ireland is similar, though there's no logic to the system, and there's B roads with 1 and 2 digits.

Ireland (the Republic) has trunk national ('N') roads and motorways ('M') with numbers 50 and under, national ('N') roads with numbers 51-99 and regional ('R') roads with 3 digit numbers (and normally unsigned local ('L') roads with 4-digit numbers). Motorways are numbered after the 'N' route they are part of (kind of like Ax(M)s except just 'M'). N roads have green signs, Motorways blue, everything else white.
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Old October 2nd, 2008, 01:39 AM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mateusz View Post
I think there is one such topic... about how roads are signed and stuff like that, highway markers or something
Possible, couldn't find it, though. Nonetheless, this is partly my own personal approach, how I think highways and motorways should be numbered. Perhaps a bit egotistical, but that's just how I'm put together
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Old October 2nd, 2008, 01:41 AM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sotonsi View Post
http://monterie.homestead.com/files/index.htm is a site that deals with pretty much all numbering systems.

I forgot to mention that I only dealt with GB - Northern Ireland is similar, though there's no logic to the system, and there's B roads with 1 and 2 digits.

Ireland (the Republic) has trunk national ('N') roads and motorways ('M') with numbers 50 and under, national ('N') roads with numbers 51-99 and regional ('R') roads with 3 digit numbers (and normally unsigned local ('L') roads with 4-digit numbers). Motorways are numbered after the 'N' route they are part of (kind of like Ax(M)s except just 'M'). N roads have green signs, Motorways blue, everything else white.
Thanks. I seem to remember this, I once went by bus through parts of western Ireland. Also, I'll get back to your UK comments a bit later. Your points are cerainly valid, even though I don't agree with all of them..
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Old October 2nd, 2008, 02:03 AM   #71
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GB is not all the quite the same. In England and Wales motorway numbering is independent of A trunk road numbering, so there is a M1 and an A1 part of which is A1(M). In Scotland though the motorway numbers generally relate to the A roads they replace, so the number start with 7-9 as A roads in Scotland do.

Quote:
Ireland (the Republic) has trunk national ('N') roads and motorways ('M') with numbers 50 and under, national ('N') roads with numbers 51-99 and regional ('R') roads with 3 digit numbers (and normally unsigned local ('L') roads with 4-digit numbers). Motorways are numbered after the 'N' route they are part of (kind of like Ax(M)s except just 'M'). N roads have green signs, Motorways blue, everything else white.
In the Republic of Ireland national roads are numbered generally anti-clockwise from Dublin, N1 , N2, N3 etc and the M1 and soon to be M2 and M3 replace parts of these routes. The replaced routes generally cease to be national roads when replaced by a motorway.

E numbers are shown on some new signs in addition to the local N or M number.

Local Lxxxx roads are now increasingly signed as an aid to navigation with GPS as rural roads do not have names.

Last edited by ardmacha; October 2nd, 2008 at 02:09 AM.
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Old October 2nd, 2008, 11:01 AM   #72
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South Africa's system is:

National roads: prefixed with N, numbered 1 to 20. (There is no N13, N16, N19 or N20 though. Cape Town has a proposed N21 that's on ice.)

Regional roads: prefixed with R, major regional roads have two digits, minor regional roads have three. Of note is previous alignments of national roads, these are changed to regional roads and have 100 added to the route number - for example, old sections of the N3 are designated R103.

Metropolitan roads: prefixed with M. Each city will have its own set of metro roads - for example, Cape Town, Port Elizabeth and Durban has its own M4. Generally, north-south roads are given odd numbers and east-west roads are given even numbers; however, there are always exceptions, and in Durban it's the other way round.

Signage: regardless of whether the road is a national, regional or metro road, signs are blue if the road is a dual-carriageway freeway, and green if it's not. Tourist signs are brown.
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Old October 2nd, 2008, 11:15 AM   #73
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In Poland:

Motorways, prefixed with A, blue signs , also E-numbers displayed

Expressways, prefixed with S, green signs, also E-numbers displayed

National Roads, from 1 to 99, prefixed with DK , but on signs there is only a number, green signs also E-numbers displayed

Voivodship Roads, from 100 to 999, prefixed with DW, but on signs there is only a
number, green signs

Last edited by Mateusz; October 2nd, 2008 at 11:20 AM.
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Old October 2nd, 2008, 06:20 PM   #74
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Regarding the German system:

- All Bundesstraßen (federal roads) have signed numbers on every crossroads and sign.
- Staats-/Landesstraßen have numbers but they don't appear on signs (but e. g. on milestones), the numbers of Kreisstraßen (county roads) don't appear at all. The signs are yellow, too (which might be a bit confusing).
- It is usual that bundesstraßen have gaps when replaced by an Autobahn. The old Bundesstraße becomes a Landesstraße (and looses its numbered signs).
- There's a logic behind the numbering system of Autobahnen and Bundesstraßen: A1, A3, A5,... run from north to south, A2, A4, A6,... from east to west. That's the best possible in a large and complex network like in Germany (where there isn't a single center all major roads run to).
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Old October 2nd, 2008, 09:22 PM   #75
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Israel:

We have no letter prefixes. The type of road is indicated by the color of its sign and the number of digits.

1) National roads - a single digit with with a red sign:

2) National and intercity roads: two digits on a red background:

3) Regional roads: 3 digits on a green background:

4) Local roads: 4 digits on a brown background:

Any of 1, 2, or 3 may be a motorway, in which case it will have a blue background: .

The first 3-digit motorway will be Road 431, which is opening soon. Road 531 will be another when it is built.

North-south roads have even numbers, east-west roads have odd numbers. Lower numbers are in the south and the east.

Some of the above rules (especially the last) are not always strictly observed, for practical reasons.

All of the above comes from Hebrew wikipedia.

Last edited by RoadUser; October 2nd, 2008 at 09:32 PM.
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Old October 3rd, 2008, 04:01 PM   #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thun View Post
Regarding the German system:

- All Bundesstraßen (federal roads) have signed numbers on every crossroads and sign.
- Staats-/Landesstraßen have numbers but they don't appear on signs (but e. g. on milestones), the numbers of Kreisstraßen (county roads) don't appear at all. The signs are yellow, too (which might be a bit confusing).
- It is usual that bundesstraßen have gaps when replaced by an Autobahn. The old Bundesstraße becomes a Landesstraße (and looses its numbered signs).
- There's a logic behind the numbering system of Autobahnen and Bundesstraßen: A1, A3, A5,... run from north to south, A2, A4, A6,... from east to west. That's the best possible in a large and complex network like in Germany (where there isn't a single center all major roads run to).
I know, and I'm not at all criticising the signposting of the Autobahn - it's the best in the world (even if it lacks a few E route markers). Furthermore, the Bundesstrassen are also good, and even though I'd like to see a more systematic approach (1-digit are more important than 2-digits that are more important than 3-digits, for instance...), it's not a bad system. However, I've driven quite a bit in Germany off the beaten Autobahn-track, and then things become a bit more tricky. Landesstrasse and Kreisstrasse numbers do not appear on maps, on distance markers or en route, and even with a 1:200 000 ADAC map, I found it somewhat difficult to navigate the minor roads.
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Old October 3rd, 2008, 11:47 PM   #77
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Yeah, you have to know a lot of destinations to find your way around on the minor roads. Only the most detailed ADAC maps show all road numbers, which is impractical because they are so large.
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Old October 4th, 2008, 01:18 PM   #78
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Italy:

Motorways are numbered from A1 onwars, apparently following the construction order (the last is A33).

Urban motorways are numbered from A50 (from A90 for Rome), but not always the number is shown on signs.

Short branch connecting two motorways have the number of both, like A8/26, or the motorway connecting A5, A4 and A26, that is numbered A4/5 and A4/26.

Switzerland:

Usually the motorways use the number of the parallel old national road (N2 ==> A2).

Sometimes A roads have only one lane per direction (parts of A6, A8, A13, A16, ...), and roads with two lanes per direction are non considered motorways (J20, T10). In this case the letter indicates the region (J=Jura mountains, T=the plateau, A or H=the Alps).
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Old October 4th, 2008, 01:31 PM   #79
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I always wondered why most regional roads in Switzerland have no road numbers.
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Old October 4th, 2008, 04:45 PM   #80
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Me too!
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