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Old March 22nd, 2009, 05:37 AM   #61
Moveax
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I don't think there will be any log trains running between Masterton and Woodville, but there is the potential of milk trains as I posted further up the page. I think there will be a need for new wagons, according to this document: http://www.ipenz.org.nz/ipenztg/pape...nd_Walbran.pdf

on page 9 it says

Quote:
The project will be implemented as follows:
• Establishment of a joint venture company (“Central Log-Rail Limited”) to operate a
one-stop (from regional log yard to on-wharf Wellington) transport service for logs
and other forest produce. The members of the JV Company will be CPL and PFP
initially.
• The JV Company to contract with Toll Rail for the provision of competitive rail
transport services to the port of Wellington, and the provision of suitable land for
operating regional log storage yards. Toll Rail will supply initial rolling stock (eight
wagons).

• PFP will, on behalf of the JV, provide yard operating and cleaning services and to
otherwise administer and promote the service in the regions, and acquire wood
directly at the yard where this will facilitate an increase in the throughput volume.
• CPL will provide priority unloading area and storage for logs delivered to the port by
rail.
• The JV Company to seek support for the operation of the service from Alternatives to
Road funding sources provided by Transfund through local Government agencies.
The JV Company will meet the cost of rolling stock (other than the first eight wagons
that are to be provided by Toll Rail).

This obviously dates back before KiwiRail, so as to who buys the new wagons now, who knows.
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Old April 1st, 2009, 02:19 AM   #62
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Wairarapa and Manawatu log freight funding approved.
Quote:
$1m to get logs off road
By NICK CHURCHOUSE - The Dominion Post
01/04/2009

A million-dollar rail freight subsidy for an Australian-owned logging company has angered truckies, but the Government says it is a hangover from the Labour years and will not happen again.

Pentarch Forest Products has scored $975,000 over three years from the Transport Agency if it shifts road-freighted logs to trains in an effort to lower road maintenance costs.

Rail consignments of export logs from Masterton, Marton and Wanganui to Wellington would get $3 a tonne in the first year, decreasing by $1 a tonne each year after.

Deborah Hume, the transport agency's director for Wellington, Nelson, Marlborough and Tasman, said the deal would save more than $1 million on road maintenance from the reduced heavy traffic.

But Road Transport Forum chief executive Tony Friedlander said it was a stupid move and contradicted the Government's direction on transport policy.

The subsidy, in effect, took business away from road freighters, who paid road user charges, and was an inefficient use of scarce roading funds.
more
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Old April 1st, 2009, 02:35 AM   #63
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Correct me if i'm wrong but isn't road freight subsidised by private motorists as well? My understanding was that road user charges only covered about half the wear and tear that heavy trucks cause on our roads. The rest was covered by the fuel tax of private motorists.

Is that correct?

Maybe Mr Friedlander does not actually object to private motorists subsidising freight just when that freight is travelling by rail.

It's also bizarre that he says truckies should pay more in road user charges if more money was needed. Is this not the same guy who kicked up the huge stink last year over the government raising the road user charges. Remember the blockade in the major centres?

These are the people dictating our national transport strategy.

Last edited by cambennett; April 1st, 2009 at 02:45 AM.
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Old April 1st, 2009, 02:40 AM   #64
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Yeah Mr Friedlander only wants the subsidies to help his truckies out. Last time I heard that big trucks cause about 1000 times the damage to a road as the average car. I certainly don't think they're paying 1000 times as much tax per km.
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Old April 1st, 2009, 03:03 AM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jarbury View Post
Yeah Mr Friedlander only wants the subsidies to help his truckies out. Last time I heard that big trucks cause about 1000 times the damage to a road as the average car. I certainly don't think they're paying 1000 times as much tax per km.
His comments would be laughable were it not for the fact his lobby group has such a big influence on the goverment. It's depressing actually.
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Old April 1st, 2009, 09:48 AM   #66
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What would they do next, concoct a train crash to discredit the rail industry?
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Old April 1st, 2009, 11:11 AM   #67
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http://www.rtfnz.co.nz/cm-trucks-pay-their-way.php

Check out their website. Here is how they explain it.
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Old April 6th, 2009, 12:05 PM   #68
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Marsden Point line

Designation progress: Notification of Applications for Resource Consents and Notice of Requirement [pdf].
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Old April 9th, 2009, 04:28 AM   #69
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KiwiRail to carry timber for WPI international
Thursday April 9, 01:42 PM
Print This Story



KiwiRail said there will be about 2000 fewer trucks travelling to Wellington's CentrePort care of a deal it has struck with WPI Timber.

A disused railway siding at WPI Timber's Tangiwai timber mill is being re-established and minor adjustments made to existing freight services to shift the freight from road to rail.

The export timber will be carried on the existing daily rail service that runs to and from the nearby Karioi Pulp Mill, also owned by WPI.

"The switch to rail, using an existing freight service, will mean around 2000 fewer truck movements a year, and associated environmental benefits," said KiwiRail's commercial general manager Aaron Temperton.

The new business was made possible by comparatively modest investment in infrastructure, he said.

Ontrack, the infrastructure arm of KiwiRail, expects to have the siding ready for use by mid-May. It has also leased land to the mill for loading space.

A new transit store will be built next to the siding to ensure the timber is kept undercover before it is loaded onto the wagons.

The mill expects to move about 50,000 cu m of sawn timber each year.

WPI has sought funding from the New Zealand Transport Agency to assist with financing the initiative.

WPI is a subsidiary of Ernslaw One Ltd, the fourth largest forestry owner in New Zealand.



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Old April 9th, 2009, 12:06 PM   #70
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excellent news - lets see more of it!
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Old April 10th, 2009, 01:01 PM   #71
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Some more positive news.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/2328...ng-Napier-line

Quote:
KiwiRail is optimistic a rail line it runs one train a week on can be improved at minimum cost to carry higher containers and attract new business.

The Napier-to-Gisborne line is a marginal branch line on which KiwiRail makes a loss. Given its scenic location it is an obvious candidate for a cycleway to boost tourism at a time when the Government is investigating an idea of a national cycleway.

KiwiRail was pleasantly surprised when a Gisborne Herald online poll was 62 per cent in favour of keeping the line for freight and steam excursion trains, with 27 per cent in favour of operating a cycleway and excursion trains.

"We run one train a week because we don't want to not run a service, but we run one train a week and lose money," said KiwiRail's commercial general manager Aaron Temperton.

KiwiRail will soon run a trial on the line to identify how much work is needed to be able to put high cube containers on the line. They are 2.9m high. Work on the network in the lower North Island in the last year or so has removed blockages to such containers.

The new business KiwiRail is eyeing includes the proposed Hikurangi Forest Farms veneer and plywood mill, which has resource consents, and could be operating by late 2011 as well as other forestry industry clients.

KiwiRail has also been talking to horticulture customers who want high cube containers.

"It appears from our simulations that it could be quite straight forward and cost effective option to lower the tracks a bit to allow us to accommodate high-cubes," he said.

KiwiRail believed there were two pinch points in two tunnels and removing them would only cost in the tens of thousands of dollars.

There are now no high cube restrictions on rail in the central region of New Zealand.

A high cube capability on the Napier to Gisborne line would increase freight to ports for exports and also improve flows on to the national domestic rail network.

KiwiRail had made contact with ten prospective clients, none of whom currently moved freight on the Napier-to-Gisborne line.

KiwiRail has previously made the point that rail upgrades are not all expensive. The capacity of the Hamilton to Tauranga line, known as the East Coast Main Trunk, was doubled by spending $13 million on passing loops.
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Old April 11th, 2009, 12:09 AM   #72
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This is also great news - It is good to see that our rail network operator is actually trying to be proactive and find ways to make the regional lines more profitable rather than the previous operators who were trying their best to close all but the major lines.

See what Toll and TranzRail couldn't see is that a rail network isn't going to be profitable if you only run a 'main truck' line service. This is because not all of our big 'train using' potential customers are located on the main truck line.

Sure, some regional lines may only ever be marginal at best, but if this provides a feeder service to the major lines then surely this ultimately helps the profitability of the rail network overall. It also allows a more comprehensive future passenger rail service.

What I cant work out is that our country has many long distance bus services which follow on routes served by a railway. I'd like to see companies such as InterCity and Newmans look at the feasibility of developing a railcar service instead - Surely it's cheaper to run a railcar than it is to run a bus (fuel usage, pollution, etc).
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Old April 12th, 2009, 08:39 AM   #73
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There were similar issues through the Kai Iwi valley section of the rail link to New Plymouth despite frequent rail freight and milk services, however Ontrack dragged their feet for many years over the issue. So it wasn't just Toll that was causing the problem

I do agree that it's good to see the companies involved being proactive.
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Old April 17th, 2009, 05:56 AM   #74
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KiwiRail under pressure to charge Toll NZ more
Friday April 17, 03:14 PM


KiwiRail is under renewed pressure from logistics companies to charge its former trucking business the same rate as everyone else.

Toll Holdings of Australia kept the trucks when it sold rail back to the Government and added to the freight forwarding business with acquisitions.


Toll NZ now operates 960 company and owner-driver trucks when all of its brands are counted. It is KiwiRail's largest freight forwarder customer.

Listed logistics company Mainfreight said it had evidence that Toll NZ gets as much as a 30 percent discount when putting its freight on rail and ferries operated by KiwiRail.

The discount was supposed to end on December 31, as was cheap, or lack of rent, on premises Toll NZ has on KiwiRail land.

Mainfreight managing director Don Braid said KiwiRail was asking for money from the Government when it could be earning more by charging a major customer the same as other customers.

"KiwiRail needs every cent it can get and here it is with poor negotiation abilities. They are missing out on valuable revenue that should be being paid by an Australian transport provider."

The TranzLink freight business owned by Tranz Rail and then Toll Holdings had always had cheap rent and subsidised rate structures.

Mainfreight said Toll NZ quoted rates in the marketplace below Mainfreight's costs.

Mainfreight is a major customer of rail and has long lobbied for improved rail services.

"What is the KiwiRail board doing? I think that board is lacking in gumption," Mr Braid said.

Toll NZ group general manager Greg Miller said the situation was complex and both parties were addressing it constructively.

Asked if Toll had threatened to take its business away from rail as a negotiating tactic, Mr Miller said "that's the last thing we want to do".

"We won't talk out of school until we have found a place where everyone can work together," he said.

"It is not a subsidy situation but it is really complex," he said.

"We have a good team of people on both sides working hard on the best outcome," he said.

KiwiRail said it did not comment on individual customer rates but anomalies were identified during the Crown's due diligence prior to the purchase of rail.

It was taking longer than expected to implement a new pricing approach, KiwiRail said.
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Old May 6th, 2009, 09:24 AM   #75
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Govt cash revives ferry plan
A roll on-roll off ferry service between New Plymouth and Nelson has just moved a step closer.

The Government this week awarded $250,000 to Port Taranaki to help fund a feasibility study into a western seaboard coastal shipping operation involving the ports of Bluff, Nelson, Greymouth, New Plymouth and Onehunga.

Port Taranaki Ltd is the lead contractor, and yesterday it hailed the study as having the potential to transform Taranaki into an important transport hub for coastal shipping.

"This could put Taranaki at the cross-hairs of New Zealand's transport network it could bring about all sorts of distribution and warehousing opportunities," said Port Taranaki chief executive Roy Weaver.

The port company has already engaged a Wellington economist as head consultant for the project, and he in turn has hired experts in New Zealand's shipping and rail industries for their assistance. Between them they now have 34 weeks to complete the feasibility study and report back to the Government's Land Transport Authority.

For several years now Port Taranaki has been at the forefront of efforts to create what it has dubbed the Blue Highway a coastal shipping service along New Zealand's western seaboard.

The port company has argued that not only would this be a very cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable means of transporting cargo between the North and South islands, but that it could also open the way for development of a roll on-roll off ferry service between New Plymouth and Nelson for both freight and passengers.

Business development manager Jon Hacon said statistics from the United States showed that for every dollar it cost to carry a tonne of freight a kilometre by sea, it cost $4 by rail and $10 by road. In Europe the equivalent ratio was $1, $3 and $6.

While there were no such figures for New Zealand, what was known was that only about 6 per cent of this country's freight was moved via coastal shipping, he said.

"This is what this study is going to be all about to find out what is New Zealand's freight task, and what is the most efficient way of transporting it around the country."

Mr Hacon said government studies forecast that the amount of freight being transported in New Zealand would double by 2025.

"So the study will be asking whether our transport infrastructure is adequate for this doubling of the freight task, if it is working properly, and even if it is all necessary.

"And most importantly, it will look at how all the transport modes can work together in the most efficient way."

Mr Weaver said the feasibility study would even go so far as to recommend ship types for a coastal service. "It will study whether or not such ships need to be lift on-lift off, or roll on-roll off, or a combination of both," he said.

Port Taranaki began exploring a New Plymouth-Nelson ferry concept more than three years ago, to the extent of talking with shipping companies. This has since led to one shipping line, Pacifica, introducing a weekly service between the two ports.

But a roll on-roll off service would take things a lot further. Truck drivers and motorists would not need to drive to Wellington to catch the inter-island ferries to the South Island, potentially cutting many hours off their journeys.
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Old May 6th, 2009, 11:24 AM   #76
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It will be interesting to see how the feasibility goes. I would have thought a link from Nelson to Wellington would be more lucrative. If the proposal goes someway towards opening up our regional cities and is viable, then it would be great.
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Old May 6th, 2009, 01:04 PM   #77
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I don't see what it has to do with the rail network, perhaps make a different thread.
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Old May 7th, 2009, 07:44 AM   #78
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According to the KiwiRail advertising feature in last week's Shipping Gazette, KiwiRail are considering developing a container transfer site at the Glenbrook Steel Mill. This would primarily cater for the increasing amount of finished product from the mill that is shipped in containers, but the implication is (as far as I can see) that the site would be available to other shippers too.

Anyone know what other possible sources of freight there are in the Glenbrook/Waiuku area?
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Old May 7th, 2009, 09:31 AM   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metroman View Post
It will be interesting to see how the feasibility goes. I would have thought a link from Nelson to Wellington would be more lucrative. If the proposal goes someway towards opening up our regional cities and is viable, then it would be great.
For those that are interested, I've written a snippet on the thread here.
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Old May 10th, 2009, 09:48 AM   #80
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A New Plymouth to Nelson Ferry?

This seems a little Pie-In-The-Sky to me... After all, the three ingredients that such a link would need to work are:
1) Good Land Transport Links to the port cities at each end.
2) Reasonable Population Base/Industry requiring such a service
3) Practical Distances/Time of Journey

A quick bit of plotting on Google Earth shows the following routes and distances:

Picton-Wellington 95 km
Picton-Mana 82 km
Picton-Wanganui 176km
Nelson-Wanganui 213km
Nelson-New Plymouth 278km

As for journey times, I can't see a Nelson-New Plymouth service really working given that a typical journey would be around 9 hours.

For the population base, neither city has a massive population base, though you can include the population base further afield if it is likely to draw truckies to those ports as opposed to those of Wellington and Picton. In this case, a Nelson service would possibly draw truckies from the West Coast and a New Plymouth good draw truckies from Hamilton, Auckland and beyond. Any time saved on the road journey would be eaten up by the longer sea voyage, but then there are the fuel costs, roading costs etc that would be saved so it probably works out reasonable, though better on the environment.

The biggest downsides I can see are the fact that there is no Rail service to Nelson to act as a feeder (and don't even think about trying to revive such a service) and the railway to New Plymouth isn't ideal either. The main highway north to Hamilton isn't particularly great either and the road from say Greymouth to Nelson is 289km compared to 349km to Picton... not a big difference.

Though I wonder if it wouldn't be a better idea to have a new port at Mana (where one of the old fast ferries used to run from) as this is a shorter route. Or, the Clifford Bay terminal once proposed by TransRail. This would boost transport times and therefore cut costs and time.

FWIW, if it was viable to run another service other than the trunk "Picton-Wellington" or similar service, then I would think that something like a Picton to Wanganui or Wanganui to Nelson would be more likely to work perhaps? Wanganui doesn't have much of a port however and what port it does have one has to contend with the Wanganui Bar - But that's not to say a new port couldn't be developed perhaps.

Personally I would rather see more money in going into beefing up rail lines and leave coastal shipping mostly as is with the country having half a dozen bigger ports and another dozen small ports. The figures about coastal shipping costs versus rail and road need to be considered VERY carefully - comparing costs with those in the US or Europe is probably not a great idea as they have much greater economies of scale than we do - Presumedly, they will use larger ships which will have a lower cost per tonne/kilometre than smaller vessels do.
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