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Old October 29th, 2008, 10:55 AM   #41
WeimieLvr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cachen View Post
oh right, its so significant and historic. being a fake city constructed barely over 200 years ago and all.

its kind of funny that a website filled with hatred towards alleged "nimbys" has all these posts. but mostly its just pathetic.

and considering this: on this forum there are some political "facts" that are so widely accepted as truth that there isn't much room for debate, like "the united states is the ultimate country of evilness, backwardsness and badness." given that, how can so many people think that the monuments and government buildings of this evil empire are worth preserving?

you hate the country and the government, but you like the monuments and buildings that represent that same country and government? what?
Ok...well...200 years is a significant historical period of time - but history doesn't need to be of a certain "old age" to be significant or real.

The discussion was not about politics, but about the importance of preservation rather than your solution. The beauty of the structures and the reasons behind their existence have a lot to do with them being widely accepted and admired...there was no mention of government. The memorials and monuments in D.C. are just as iconic and important as any others throughout the world.

I'm not sure where you picked up any "hatred for the evil U.S. government", but I certainly don't hate it - although I'm not fond of the current administration. Intelligent people don't just throw in the towel when they are unhappy with leadership in a democracy...but that is headed off-topic.
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Old October 31st, 2008, 09:36 PM   #42
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leave dc alone. put those boxes in new york.
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Old November 1st, 2008, 02:09 AM   #43
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New York has way too many boxes.
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Old November 2nd, 2008, 01:48 AM   #44
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skyscraper for Washington bad idea, washington is one of the beautifull city for what the city has.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 11:44 PM   #45
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Create a CBD on the outskirts of the city, like Paris has. Skyscrapers haven't ruined Paris.

Building up is always better than building out.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 11:50 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by cornish pasty View Post
Create a CBD on the outskirts of the city, like Paris has. Skyscrapers haven't ruined Paris.

Building up is always better than building out.
That's actually what DC is doing with transit oriented developments. DC has multiple skylines scattered around it's suburbs very close to the city. Probably the most famous being Rossyln in Arlington or Silver Springs in Maryland.
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Old November 13th, 2008, 12:54 AM   #47
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lol silver springs
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Old November 13th, 2008, 04:25 AM   #48
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I dunno why so many people pluralize spring
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Old December 1st, 2008, 05:29 AM   #49
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This is an interesting connundrum. Putting skyscrapers in the suberbs wouldnt really work, since then DC wouldnt get any tax money from that, i think... DC itself is quite a paradox. It was never really supposed to have people in it year round, and now they dont have representation in congress. Ah well, its a beautiful place though!
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Old December 15th, 2008, 05:04 AM   #50
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NO... DC has it's own beauty and style vs other USA cities. I would love a bit of more density, but within the current style of architecture.
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Old December 15th, 2008, 06:54 AM   #51
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Skyscrapers would look out of place in DC.

If there's space nearby for a proper cluster of highrises I say go for it. There nothing I hate more than skyscrapers scattered throughout a city...except for black licorice, I hate black licorice.
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Old December 26th, 2008, 03:12 AM   #52
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i gess skyscrapers ruin the, "historic" beauty and heritage of D.C.

Imagine skyscrapers jotting out from behind the Lincoln center, white house, the capitol, the monument? it would completely ruin the view.
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Old December 26th, 2008, 05:26 AM   #53
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I know Madrid has made the same mistake before.

image hosted on flickr
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Old December 26th, 2008, 05:45 AM   #54
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now, really, they should limit the height of buildings in the city. Or, if possible, locate a central CBD away from D.C.'s landmarks. Like Paris's le Defense CBD built just outside the city to avoid Paris's rich cultural architecture.
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Old December 28th, 2008, 05:15 PM   #55
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The Montparnasse tower in Paris is so poorly located also.

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Old December 29th, 2008, 05:21 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chong View Post
now, really, they should limit the height of buildings in the city. Or, if possible, locate a central CBD away from D.C.'s landmarks. Like Paris's le Defense CBD built just outside the city to avoid Paris's rich cultural architecture.
that's already been done in several locations outside the city
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Old December 29th, 2008, 05:27 AM   #57
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Quote:
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that's already been done in several locations outside the city
Where? Baltimore seems to be the closest city with any sort of skyline.
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Old December 29th, 2008, 06:06 AM   #58
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Originally Posted by Taiki24 View Post
Where? Baltimore seems to be the closest city with any sort of skyline.
Have you ever been to DC?

..and looked across the river (rosslyn)
image hosted on flickr

http://flickr.com/photos/imagesbyaj/1024562794/

or went a little outside..(silver spring)

(posted on cd)

Bethesda

(posted on cd)

Ballston

(posted on cd)

tysons Corner (horrible photo)

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...icial%26sa%3DN

Rockville
image hosted on flickr

(from CD)

Gaithsburg

(from CD)

The New National Harbor

(posted at cd)

etc etc theres so many suburban areas of offices and retail etc
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Old December 29th, 2008, 06:29 PM   #59
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It seems that the only option for D.C is to densify to a point where it restricts business. Then maybe we should see how the law stands up. There is still plenty of land to the east and south to develop into a higher density, right?
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 05:46 PM   #60
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Space Available
Firms looking at leases' end find friendly D.C. market.

10 May 2010
The National Law Journal

It's a good year to be a law firm near the end of its lease in Washington. Commercial vacancy rates have hit double digits for the first time in more than a decade, driving landlords to make valuable concessions.

Some of Washington's largest law offices could profit. With leases expiring in the next few years, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom; Arnold & Porter; Covington & Burling; and McDermott Will & Emery are among those considering a move.

But even a tenant-friendly real estate market has its limits. In Washington, where skyscrapers are barred by law, buildings that can house firms needing 200,000 square feet of space or more are fairly few. And the vacancy rates are not nearly as favorable in Washington's central business district, which has prompted some firms to think outside the borders.

Bobby Burchfield, co-managing partner of McDermott's Washington office, said he would consider moving at least part of his firm across the river to Virginia if the price were right. "Keeping the option of opening at least a satellite office in Virginia on the table really opens up the competition," Burchfield said. McDermott's lease expires in 2012.

With a vacancy rate of 11.5% in Washington, or about 13 million square feet of available commercial real estate, five Washington-based brokers said landlords are increasingly willing to make concessions that were unheard of three or four years ago. Matthew Levin, a vice president at the real estate firm West, Lane & Schlager, said that prospective tenants for the top-end office space can negotiate $100 per square foot or more in concessions in their lease agreement, including between six and eight months of free rent. Some landlords are also agreeing to swallow building-out costs worth between $60 and $70 per square foot. "These are the kinds of deals that you won't see again for a long, long time," Levin predicted.

Law firms are taking advantage, said Raymond Ritchey, executive vice president and national director of acquisitions and development at Boston Properties. Ritchey said he is seeing more and more firms sign longer-term leases to avoid "having to re-enter the market every 10 or 15 years." He said the trend has been to sign 15-to 20-year leases.

Those who might not be ready to lock in the firm for the next two decades still appreciate the sweeteners. In March, Wiley Rein inked the largest lease this year in Washington when it extended its stay at two linked properties for another 10 years, beginning in 2014. Wiley's lease renewal covers 191,314 square feet at 1776 K St. N.W. and 143,926 square feet at 1750 K St. N.W.

Richard Wiley, a name partner at Wiley Rein, said the firm had been looking at its options for the past two years and considered 12 different locations. "In the end, the partners voted almost unanimously to stay where we were," Wiley said. But the firm was able to broker a better deal than it had before. Wiley said the landlords agreed to improve the heating and cooling systems in both buildings.

Arthur Santry III, who leads the national law firm practice at real estate firm Cassidy Turley, said firms that stay in older buildings, like Wiley Rein, often pay significantly less. Wiley himself said the firm is paying about 25% less than it would for a newer building. That would put it at about $20 million a year in rent.

Other law firms have opted this year to explore leases in new buildings. Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson has signed a 16-year lease, starting next year, for 102,000 square feet at 801 17th St. N.W., which is the first office building in Washington to achieve Platinum LEEDcertification, the highest level of "green" certification for new construction. Vinson & Elkins is negotiating to move into 70,000 square feet across the street at 800 17th St. N.W.

Real estate brokers said that, for new buildings, firms can expect to pay about $80 per square foot, meaning Fried Frank will likely pay about $8.16 million annually and Vinson & Elkins would likely pay about $5.6 million.

The biggest Washington law office known to be looking at a new building is Skadden. As reported by the Washington Business Journal, the firm has signed a letter of intent to lease 350,000 square feet in the new CityCenter D.C., down from the firm's 370,000 square feet at 1440 New York Ave. N.W. That deal is dependent on the project's developers, Hines Interests and Archstone Apartments, shoring up financing for the project, which is pegged at $800 million for the initial stage. The center, which would occupy the site of the old convention center, is designed for 500,000 square feet of office space, plus residential and retail space. If the financing comes through, the project could begin construction in 2011 with a movein date of mid-2013. Skadden's lease is up in 2013. Clifford "Mike" Naeve, managing partner of Skadden's Washington office, declined to comment on the deal.

NEW NEIGHBORHOODS

To reap the best deals, brokers suggest firms must be willing to relocate to the area north of Massachusetts Avenue or east to the Navy Yard neighborhood near Nationals Park.

"That's fine," said McDermott's Burchfield. He said McDermott would definitely consider moving to either locale. Burchfield added that moving out of the city could have benefits that far outweigh the ego boost that comes from being in the nation's capital. "If we moved at least part of our operation to Virginia, it would make the commute much easier for a lot of our lawyers," he said. Also, "It would be a way to show clients, who are all pushing firms to be more efficient so as not to pass higher costs along to them, that we are willing to look at all of the options out there."

McDermott, which rents more than 190,000 square feet at 600 13th St. N.W., will face some competition if and when it starts looking at particular spaces. In addition to the smaller law offices that, brokers said, are actively looking now—including Ballard Spahr and Baker & McKenzie— two of the city's longtime largest firms are in, or about to enter, the market.

Real estate brokers said that Arnold & Porter and Covington have begun interviewing candidates to represent them. Arnold & Porter's lease on 450,000 square feet at 555 12th St. N.W. expires in 2015. Covington has 300,000 square feet at 1201 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. and 100,000 square feet at 1275 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. Its lease expires in 2016. Lawyers from both Arnold & Porter and Covington declined to comment.

Other law firms with leases coming to a close may want to get out there too. Santry predicted the market will begin to swing back in favor of landlords within the next 18 months to two years.

He said, "Now's the time to be thinking about your options."
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