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Old November 1st, 2008, 01:21 AM   #41
serdar samanlı
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Old Grenoble station looks like Sirkeci Station in Istanbul
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Old November 3rd, 2008, 08:19 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dl3000 View Post
I was reminded of your post when coming across the following article in the current edition of Montreal's weekly Mirror (Oct-30 thru Nov-05).


from:http://www.montrealmirror.com/2008/103008/artsweek.html
Let there be light
Looking above for inspiration, the CCA --i.e., Canadian Centre for Architecture/Centre Canadien d'Architecture-- (1920 Baile) examines the diverse history of skylights in their latest exhibition Toplight: Roof Transparencies From 1760 to 1960.


OPEN CONCEPT:
Penn Station, 1936

Consisting of photographs, prints and drawings, all of which are culled from the centre’s own library and archives, the exhibit explores the social, cultural and political catalysts behind the use of glass in architecture.

Included in the exhibit are images of the first large-scale glass roof construction at the Halle au blé in Paris. Completed in 1782, the see-through roof was meant to contradict rumours of stockpiling or price hiking. London’s Crystal Palace, the Louvre and Detroit’s own Ford Motor Company also feature prominently in the show, alongside New York’s early working-class tenements and the city’s original Penn Station.

Berenice Abbott’s 1936 photographs, displaying the station’s cathedral-like grandeur, are perhaps the most impressive in the show. Especially if you’ve ever visited its current incarnation of bleak, labyrinthine concourses buried deep under Madison Square Gardens. Until Feb. 15.

by SACHA JACKSON
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Old November 4th, 2008, 12:23 AM   #43
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1914年の東京駅

アメリカの爆撃により破壊された1945年の東京駅
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Old November 9th, 2008, 09:48 AM   #44
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How did old Rome train station looked like? Current Termini sttaion was built in 1950
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Old November 9th, 2008, 09:51 AM   #45
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Demolition of Penn stn was a true crime. It least they preserve Grand Central
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Old November 9th, 2008, 03:56 PM   #46
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Vienna may be famous as imperial city its major train stations did not survive the war however. A huge loss for the city as they were mostly replaced by ugly post war architecture.

Funnily I could post some of the post war railway stations here as well as they have been replaced or are currently getting replaced. Wheres its hard to say if the new ones are that wonder pieces of architecture either. They however at least new and shiny.

Here we go:

Westbahnhof (western railway station)




Südbahnhof (southern railway station)




Nordbahnhof (northern railwaystation, nowadays replaced by the Praterstern station right next to the old location)


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Last edited by Slartibartfas; November 9th, 2008 at 07:37 PM.
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Old November 9th, 2008, 10:15 PM   #47
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One reason why we must be against war
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Old November 10th, 2008, 02:57 PM   #48
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Train Station Hamburg-Altona:

At the end of the 19th century the first train station became too small for the traffic. So it was decided to build a new one further north and make the old one to the new town hall of Altona. The building survived WWII and still exists today. Nowadays it is the administrative seat of the district Altona.

Around 1890 (view from the south)


today (view from the north)



The real crime however was the destruction of the 2nd train station. It was built in 1898, rebuilt in the 1950s and finally demolished and replaced by an ugly new train station in 1979. As reason for the demolition counted that the building couldn't withstand the vibration caused by the construction works of the S-Bahn-tunnel. Ironically the demolition company had its problems demolishing the building, as it turned out to be a very stable construction, and so the demolition company went bankrupt.
The building of 1979 soon was called "Shopping Mall with siding track". And because it was so ugly, it has been renovated in 2005. However nobody knows how long it will still serve as a train station. There are plans to shut down the train service (just leaving the S-Bahn station in service) and build a completely new station further north.


The train station in 1912 (building on the left)


Train station after refurbishment in 2005
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Old November 10th, 2008, 05:50 PM   #49
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Chicago Dearborn Station:



Chicago Central Station:



Chicago LaSalle Street Station:



Chicago Grand Central Station:



Chicago Well Street Station:



Chicago LaSalle Updated Station:



Chicago Northwestern Station:



Chicago Jackson Park Terminal:



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Old November 10th, 2008, 08:04 PM   #50
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Wow, such great stations in Chicago. They all have been demolished? What a crime.
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Old November 10th, 2008, 11:00 PM   #51
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Chicago Northwestern stn lookslike NYC Grand Central
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Old November 11th, 2008, 06:12 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slartibartfas View Post
Wow, such great stations in Chicago. They all have been demolished? What a crime.
I was actually wrong about one of them:

This 123 year old station:





Had a fire in 1922:



And was rebuilt without the steeped roofs (which I think were it's best qualities).



The station was closed in the 1970's, but the building was saved. The area behind the station was very ugly and run down, and the tracks were all torn up and the station was renovated after sitting vacant for 10 years.





New homes and a park were built in the old train yard (you can see the tower of the station at the end of the development):

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Old November 12th, 2008, 03:07 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggerD21 View Post
Train station after refurbishment in 2005
This is AFTER refurbishment?

How bad was it before?
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Old November 12th, 2008, 03:31 PM   #54
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Horrible
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Some of my photoseries: Northern Ireland, Prague, Boston, Alaska part 1, 2, 3, Smoggy Moscow, Warsaw, Wrocław, Kiev, Donetsk, Odessa and Chişinău.
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Old November 13th, 2008, 12:22 AM   #55
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http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/s...et/index.shtml

Broad Street Station in London, demolished in the mid 80's and replaced with the Broadgate development.
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Old November 16th, 2008, 08:38 PM   #56
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we should create theme about demolished railways
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Old November 22nd, 2008, 12:55 AM   #57
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Hedjaz Railway Station in Damascus, Syria. Isn't demolished, but all tracks are removed, the building is being converted into a shopping mall, according to SSC member Benonie .

Well, now THIS is the station of Damascus:

(picture of Benonie)
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Old June 25th, 2009, 01:34 AM   #58
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MISC | Demolished Railway Stations

Demolished! 11 Beautiful Train Stations That Fell To The Wrecking Ball (And The Crappy Stuff Built In Their Place)
http://www.infrastructurist.com/2009...wrecking-ball/

Posted on Monday June 22nd by Yonah Freemark and Jebediah Reed



In 1963, America learned a painful lesson when Pennsylvania Station, an architectural treasure that Senator Daniel Moynihan described as “the best thing in our city,” was torn down and replaced with a dreary complex that includes an office building and Madison Square Garden. The rail station, to this day the nation’s busiest, was moved underground into a claustrophobic warren of artificially lit passageways and bleak waiting rooms. While there has been an active campaign since the 1990’s to rectify the mistake by creating a new and worthy station a block away, the $1 billion-plus project remains stuck in political gridlock.

But the sad saga of Penn was by no means an isolated incident. Almost like a rite of passage, cities across the country embraced the era of Interstates, Big Macs, and suburban sprawl by tearing down their train depots. (Frequently, they just did the Joni Mitchell thing and put up a parking lot.) But time and experience are showing that train stations are vital organs in a healthy city, and removing them deadens the entire organism. The lesson is especially stark at the moment, as cities around the country face the challenge of rebuilding the infrastructure for regional high speed rail networks. Chicago–once abundantly blessed with grand stations–is today bouncing around ideas for a new high speed rail depot.

One lesson of this legacy is that what replaces a well designed and centrally located rail depot is rarely of equal worth to the city. Following is a tour of 10 great depots that were lost to demolition orders–plus one more that might be still–and what stands on those sites today.

1. NEW YORK CITY: Pennsylvania Station

THEN: “The best thing in our city,” according to Sen. Daniel Moynihan



WHAT’S THERE NOW: The new Penn Station is a dingy labyrinth beneath an ugly arena



2. MEMPHIS - Union Station

When this city’s Union Station opened in 1912, it was the largest stone structure in town. But when the U.S. Postal Service announced that it needed new land in the city in the late 1960s, the magnificent building was chosen for demolition because it no longer attracted the crowds that it had once brought into the city. Any interest in saving the structure itself was ignored.

These days Memphis is expressing interest in being part of the Southeast High Speed Rail Corridor.

THEN: A grand Beaux Arts depot for a thriving city



WHAT’S THERE NOW: A windowless postal facility surrounded by barbed wire



3. ATLANTA - Terminal Station

Atlanta was once the largest rail crossroads in the south. Travelers could get virtually everywhere quickly and conveniently by rail. Built in 1905, Terminal was the grand portal to the city. It had two Italianate towers and a huge train shed behind. When the station was razed in 1970, it was replaced by a government office building. These days Atlanta’s intercity rail depot is a small former commuter rail station located far north of downtown, adjacent to a 16-lane highway.

Recently, Georgia governor Sonny Perdue–after scouting the passenger rail systems in Spain and China–has enthusiastically embraced the idea of a high speed rail network for the southeastern US. Of course, Atlanta would be a network hub–and very likely in need of a suitable depot.

THEN: A fitting portal to a regional capital



NOW: A government office building



4. BIRMINGHAM, AL - Terminal Station

In 1909, Birmingham opened its grand Terminal Station, which united the train services of six operators. The two block-long Byzantine-styled complex had 10 tracks, and when opened was the largest of its kind in the South.

Yet this station — which served a peak of 54 trains a day in 1943 — by 1969 only was seeing seven daily arrivals. As a result, the city chose to demolish the structure that year. Although the land was originally intended for a new federal building, a highway was built there instead.

Today, Birmingham is slated as a primary stop on the designated high speed rail corridor linking New Orleans and Atlanta.

THEN: An impressive and centrally located depot



NOW: A connector highway



5. CHICAGO: Grand Central Station

Perhaps more than any other American city, Chicago’s destiny has been a result of its transportation links to the rest of the country. As such, it had something of an abundance of train stations. Even while it still has four commuter terminals inside the Loop, knocking down impressive stations like Grand Central did not yield much for the city. The site of this former station, prime real estate on the banks of the Illinois River, is still a vacant lot after nearly four decades.

THEN: Located on the banks of the Chicago River, the beautiful station with ornate marble floors, Corinthian columns, and a fireplace. It served travelers to DC and many other cities.



NOW: A vacant lot



6. CHICAGO: Central Station

This 13-story Romanesque structure was built in 1893 and demolished eight decades later. Like former Grand Central, the site remains undeveloped to this day.

THEN: A well-designed depot in the heart of downtown on the shore of Lake Michigan



NOW: Undeveloped land at the edge of Grant Park



7. ROCHESTER: NY Central Railroad Station

Rochester’s principal train station opened in 1914, with New York Central Railroad connections to New York, Albany, and Buffalo. The elaborate curved brick exterior made a prominent mark on downtown. But the decline in passenger traffic emptied the station by the late 1950s, and the building was razed in 1965. In its place? A parking lot.

THEN: A local architectural triumph and an important part of the local infrastructure



NOW: A parking lot and an unappealing Amtrak facility



8. ATLANTA: Union Station

After being built in 1930, the smaller of Atlanta’s train depots was demolished in 1972.

THEN: A centrally-located secondary depot serving a large city



NOW: A parking lot




9. BOSTON - North Station


Boston completed its Union Station in 1895, but tore it down only thirty years later to build the Boston Garden basketball arena. Which is to say, the city lost a beautiful neoclassical structure for its train services, replacing it instead with a basement of a stadium. When the Garden itself was demolished for a new arena in 1995–the mellifluously-named TD BankNorth Garden–North Station was renewed as an underground facility (still, sadly, not directly linked to the city’s larger South Station). While it’s easy to pick on the new Garden’s bland design, the new building is at least a vital and economically productive part of the city’s fabric. The fact that North Station fell so long ago, might have something to do with this.

THEN: An important portal for commuter and intercity rail travelers traveling to or from points north



NOW: The new Garden and an underground rail station



10. SAVANNAH: Union Station

Completed in 1902, the Savannah Union Station stood on the west end of downtown with its two Spanish Renaissance towers marking its presence on the historic city’s skyline. For blacks in the city, Union Station was the center of life. All that changed, however, in 1963 when building the depot and much of the neighborhood around it was bulldozed to make way for the tail end of an Interstate.

If Gov. Sonny Perdue gets his way, Savannah will someday reclaim its rail heritage and become a stop on an HSR link between Atlanta and Jacksonville.

THEN: An attractive and well-used depot in the center of town



NOW: Feeder ramps at the tail end of a highway



11. DETROIT - MICHIGAN CENTRAL STATION


Unlike the other stations on this list, Michigan Central is still standing. But if the Detroit city council gets its way the station, which was the 1912 encore act by the same team of architects that designed NYC’s Grand Central (itself almost a victim of the wrecking ball until the US Supreme Court intervened in 1978), will be demolished. Ironically, the city council wants to use funds from the stimulus act–the same piece of legislation that provided $8 billion to begin building a high speed rail network–to do the dirty work on Michigan Central.

Though it has suffered two decades of vandalism and disuse, the depot remains well worth saving. With a bit of imagination it could be part of Detroit’s future as a hub on the Midwest regional HSR network.

THEN AND NOW: The building was the second act of the architects who designed NYC’s Grand Central Terminal. But will it be demolished now as Grand Central almost was in the ’70s (even years after the epic mistake of tearing down Penn)?

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Last edited by Imperfect Ending; June 25th, 2009 at 01:42 AM.
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Old June 25th, 2009, 01:38 AM   #59
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What a shame.
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Old June 25th, 2009, 03:39 AM   #60
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One of the reasons why the American society is so suburban in nature. The cities were destroyed and turned into parking lots and business boxes.
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