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Old June 25th, 2009, 06:41 AM   #61
Xusein
 
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Yes, a lot of urban planners these days are probably thinking of the actions of the past, "WTF were they smoking?"

Pretty much every US city is guilty of some kind of action of this, in the name of urban renewal...

This is why registering buildings like these as "historic" is so important.
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Old June 25th, 2009, 10:59 PM   #62
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yeah hard to believe anyone ever thought it was a good idea to destroy all those beautiful buildings. All in the name of progress
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Old June 25th, 2009, 11:42 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by intensivecarebear View Post
yeah hard to believe anyone ever thought it was a good idea to destroy all those beautiful buildings. All in the name of progress
More like backwards thinking and an ideology we're now paying for.
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Old June 25th, 2009, 11:58 PM   #64
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The worst act of destruction in London was the old Euston station, swept away and replaced with a bland concrete and glass block in the 1960's:

The famous Euston Arch





The Great Hall

[IMG]http://i40.************/55fo89.jpg[/IMG]

Replaced by this:



London's only ever lost 2 termini out of its original 16 or so, Broad Street and Holborn Viaduct.

Broad Street, a little bit OTT Gothic... Swept away in the 1980's after the North London Line services were diverted around a new orbital route and replaced by the Broadgate office development:

[IMG]http://i44.************/211rx8z.jpg[/IMG]

Holborn Viaduct (no linking allowed to the photos). The original railway hotel was quite nice, but damaged in the War and destroyed for good in 1963, the actual station itself was never anything special.
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Old June 26th, 2009, 12:03 AM   #65
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Chicago's probably the worst!!
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Old June 26th, 2009, 12:27 AM   #66
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This, for me, is one of the most interesting threads, and at the same time the most depressing.

I am very familiar with Britain's demolition work in the railway arena, but I had no idea that the US had been home to such fine architecture.

Would it be right to say that once upon a time, US cities were much more European in their design than many people think?

I've never seen such an image of Pennsylvania Station. It looks fantastic. How on earth did someone agree to it's demolition?
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Old June 26th, 2009, 01:25 AM   #67
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Why is it called the Famous Euston Arch when few have heard of it?

Seriously though, any plan to recreate this has my approval.
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Old June 26th, 2009, 01:35 AM   #68
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It's famous in the UK. It falls from architecture and railway enthusiasts' lips as easily as Penn Station does in North America. It had a less dignified aftermath than Penn Station, too; some of the arch was dumped in a river, while some allegedly was used for landscaping a British Railways executive's garden
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Old June 26th, 2009, 05:18 AM   #69
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wow its sad really that they had to do that, these stations the way they were designed were beautiful and be ruined by stupid 1950's America logic of surburban houses, Freeways, and fast foods.

you know your right the United states at a time was more european which is a good thing actually meaning more mass transit around.

but still how in the hell these people at the time ruined something so Romantic as this, Rail travel is very romantic and it seems most americans don't give a jack about it.

thanks for the thread this is an interesting one.

oh and Penn Station before was more beautiful then the current one even though the NJ side of Penn Station is very beautiful but still its no match with the classic Penn Station now that the Romance of the Railways.
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Old June 26th, 2009, 07:02 AM   #70
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Quote:
5. CHICAGO: Grand Central Station

Perhaps more than any other American city, Chicago’s destiny has been a result of its transportation links to the rest of the country. As such, it had something of an abundance of train stations. Even while it still has four commuter terminals inside the Loop, knocking down impressive stations like Grand Central did not yield much for the city. The site of this former station, prime real estate on the banks of the Illinois River, is still a vacant lot after nearly four decades.

THEN: Located on the banks of the Chicago River, the beautiful station with ornate marble floors, Corinthian columns, and a fireplace. It served travelers to DC and many other cities.



NOW: A vacant lot



6. CHICAGO: Central Station

This 13-story Romanesque structure was built in 1893 and demolished eight decades later. Like former Grand Central, the site remains undeveloped to this day.

THEN: A well-designed depot in the heart of downtown on the shore of Lake Michigan



NOW: Undeveloped land at the edge of Grant Park

I see these spots as huge opportunities for big projects. Any plans?
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Old June 26th, 2009, 07:45 AM   #71
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Maybe bring some 220 mph lines in for Milwaukee, St. Louis, Twin Cities, Indianapolis, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Columbus, and connect up the entire Midwest in relation to Chicago since the population of that city is large, it will make people want to move closer to the rail terminals and developers dense up in the city as it is sprawled just like Newark.
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Old June 26th, 2009, 05:36 PM   #72
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Ah, this is a good thread for what I am about to show you.

Saint Enoch Station - Glasgow, United Kingdom

Photos courtesy of http://www.urbanglasgow.co.uk

From this:




To this:



Glasgow, at the time had the biggest rail Network in the UK outside of London. It still claims this title, but unfortunately a large fraction of it has disappeared. Unfortunately this was demolished way before my time so I never lived to appreciate it. However, I know for damn certain that given the opportunity I'd start a protest to prevent this s***hole that they call the St. Enoch Centre, from ever being built in its place.
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Old June 26th, 2009, 10:24 PM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman View Post
The worst act of destruction in London was the old Euston station, swept away and replaced with a bland concrete and glass block in the 1960's:

The famous Euston Arch

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y68...ustonArchh.jpg

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y68...EustonArch.jpg


Replaced by this:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._concourse.jpg

It's being rebuilt though, isn't it?
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Old June 27th, 2009, 01:21 AM   #74
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The station's being rebuilt soon, and a rebuilt arch has been proposed, but nothing's been confirmed on either part of the project. Some stones from the Arch have been recovered from the Prescott Channel, though.

There's more info here: http://eustonarch.org/
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Old June 27th, 2009, 04:19 AM   #75
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Fortunately, Europe has saved most of its train stations. Here in America, we have to re-invent the wheel at a much greater cost.
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Old June 27th, 2009, 04:30 AM   #76
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I'm surprised Broad Street Station in Philadelphia is not on the American list:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broad_S..._(Philadelphia)

It once had the largest single spanning train shed in the world. It was demolished and the station was buried underground. As much as I miss the building, it was probably for the better of the city, as the station was too ginormous.
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Old June 27th, 2009, 04:57 AM   #77
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in all the cases, it's the dang shame!!!
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Old June 28th, 2009, 09:12 AM   #78
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Oh yea, I saw this at Infrastructurist. Someone should put up the follow-up post. They added 6 more stations to the count.

I've always wondered "why not" rebuild long lost architecture. Is it because one can't smell the authenticity? Old buildings rule! I mean they're still building La Sagrada Familia why can't we rebuild some old freaking awesome Pennsylvania Station.
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Old June 28th, 2009, 10:28 AM   #79
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It'd take forever to build and be extremely expensive, unless you know a way to imitate on a cheap price. This is just devils advocate in probably what they'd say, but I would love to bring the old Penn station back with newer inside.
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Old June 28th, 2009, 03:51 PM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nouveau.ukiyo View Post
I'm surprised Broad Street Station in Philadelphia is not on the American list:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broad_S...(Philadelphia)

It once had the largest single spanning train shed in the world. It was demolished and the station was buried underground. As much as I miss the building, it was probably for the better of the city, as the station was too ginormous.
In this case, I think the demolition was more forgiveable as the spectacular trainshed roof had burnt to the ground thirty years before the rest of the station was demolished, and there were good operational reasons for constructing the underground stations.
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