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Old March 1st, 2013, 10:28 AM   #201
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A Pearl in asian but i don't like Allthing from china...
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Old March 13th, 2013, 06:22 PM   #202
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Mid-field Terminal Construction

1/13





















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Old March 25th, 2013, 06:35 PM   #203
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1/27

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Old March 25th, 2013, 10:46 PM   #204
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Old March 27th, 2013, 01:00 PM   #205
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Looks amazing, thank you for posting them!
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Old July 22nd, 2013, 12:23 PM   #206
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Site near airport eyed for 'bridgehead' shops
The Standard
Monday, July 22, 2013

The commercial land near Hong Kong International Airport will be developed into a "bridgehead economy" catering largely to mainland tourists, as an influx is expected after the scheduled completion of the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge in 2016.

Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying has asked the Airport Authority to study the 12.5-square-kilometer site, on the northern part of Chek Lap Kok, in hopes of speeding up development of the island into a leading recreation and shopping center.

The research will be supervised by the Airport Authority's Infrastructural Planning Committee chairman, Vincent Lo Hong-shui.

The authority was granted permission to manage and develop the commercial land that lies between Terminal 2 and AsiaWorld-Expo.

Although the government has always wanted to develop the site into a comprehensive commercial center, no long-term plan has been formulated.

But as the bridge is due to open in three years, the government is now pushing for the development of a commercial district in the north of the island, where mainland tourists may shop as soon as they cross the bridge.

The 120,000-square-meter land is now used as a temporary golf course and parking lot, but the leases will expire next month. After that, the authority will renew the leases on a three-month basis.

The authority had been considering whether to develop the island for a long time, but held back over the concern that commercial development may overlap with construction sites for a third runway.

Similarly, the previous administration did not plan to turn the whole island into a commercial district. It was suggested that some land should be reserved for expansion of airport facilities.

However, as the current government actively pushes for the new development, the authority has started to review some relevant suggestions.

Authority board member Miriam Lau Kin-ye said while the board has not held any discussions about the island's development, research should be speeded up as the bridge will be completed soon.
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Old July 27th, 2013, 08:27 AM   #207
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Hong Kong must exhaust all other options before building third runway
Albert Cheng suggests ways the Airport Authority could raise its handling capacity, not least by better co-ordinating its airspace traffic
19 July 2013
South China Morning Post

The Airport Authority recently ran newspaper advertisements to pave the way for its plan to build a third runway and engage the public over the ongoing environmental impact assessment of the project.

I have always objected to a third runway, mainly because the airport still has not fully utilised the capacity of the existing two runways. Building a third runway is not only a waste of resources; it will also seriously affect the nearby natural environment.

The problem stems from the fact that the director general of civil aviation is trying to play safe and has thus limited aircraft movements to 64 flights per hour for the two-runway system. By 2015, aircraft movements are expected to reach 68 per hour.

This is way below international standards. Take Heathrow for example. Its two runways handle up to 80 aircraft movements per hour.

If only Hong Kong could shake off its conservative management mindset, the airport could almost certainly immediately increase its runway capacity to reach international standards. That way, we could save resources and wouldn't need a third runway.

In fact, when the airport was still under construction, a British aviation consultant set the hourly aircraft movements at 75. But civil aviation chief Norman Lo Shung-man said aircraft movements could only reach 68 by 2015, rejecting what the consultant had said.

What could be the reasons for these restrictions? One is that our airport cannot increase the hourly aircraft movements due to our restricted airspace. In other words, the airspace congestion problem is not caused by a traffic bottleneck on the runways, but by the limited airspace.

Former civil aviation chief Albert Lam Kwong-yu said previously that the Hong Kong and national aviation authorities had already reached a consensus on how to manage the airspace to the north of the airport. But the current chief appears to have rejected this consensus and chosen a regressive path instead.

That's why we should look again at the option of expanding air space in the north.

I also wonder about the Airport Authority's motives for building a third runway. It seems motivated by a sense of grandeur, rather than practicality, and is looking to expand to secure its existence.

A third runway won't really resolve the problem; even this new runway would not be fully utilised.

Another reason why the runways are underutilised is the lack of professional talent. The civil aviation department blames a lack of locally trained air traffic controllers for not being able to raise the number of aircraft movements.

This is a rather backward-looking attitude. If we have a shortage of controllers, why not recruit overseas professionals? With more air traffic controllers, we can boost runway capacity and the airport would be able to handle more aircraft movements.

Lo and his department just seem full of excuses and are resistant to change.

Another point worth focusing on is synchronising our computer communication system with that of the mainland aviation authority. Hong Kong uses the American Raytheon system at the air traffic control centre, while the mainland uses the French Thales system.

If we can synchronise our computer systems, no doubt we would be able to further enhance communication and help boost traffic capacity.

I am not blindly objecting to airport expansion, but cost effectiveness is important.

At present, our airport is rather busy and congested mainly because of a lack of areas to park aircraft. To resolve this, we don't need a third runway, but rather a third terminal to increase parking spaces.

With the mainland's rapid economic development, the role of Hong Kong's airport as an international aviation hub will gradually diminish, as it is replaced by the airports in Guangzhou and Shenzhen as economic expansion focuses on the Pearl River Delta.

Even if our airport is not replaced completely, the shift of focus will lessen our role and competitive edge. That's why building a third runway would be ineffective and would only create a white elephant.

Hong Kong needs development, but not ineffective development that ultimately turns into wasteful white elephants and stirs public opposition and discontent.

We should focus our resources and strengths to further enhance our development advantages. We need to always be one step ahead in our mindset to remain in a leading position. To increase our competitiveness and advantages doesn't mean expansion.

A sensible approach is to increase our airport's hourly aircraft movements to 75 and build a third passenger terminal as soon as possible. Big is not always effective - substance is far more important.

Albert Cheng King-hon is a political commentator.
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Old August 2nd, 2013, 05:51 AM   #208
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Runways to reach early saturation point
The Standard
Friday, August 02, 2013



The two runways at Hong Kong International Airport will reach maximum capacity by 2017 - or three years earlier than originally projected, according to the Airport Authority.

It estimated two years ago that the runways would reach saturation point by 2020, and called for a third runway.

However chief executive officer, Stanley Hui Hon-chung, said yesterday the runways are likely to be saturated by 2017 at the earliest.

During an exhibition on the third runway, Hui said the airport is undergoing rapid growth. "Therefore, the need for a third runway has become even more pressing," he said.

The airport saw an 8percent rise in passenger capacity, flight takeoffs and landings last month, compared to July last year. Cargo-carrying capacity also recorded a slight increase.

By 2030, Hui said, passenger trips through Hong Kong will increase to 102.3 million and freight traffic will reach 8.9 million tonnes a year.

Furthermore, there will be 607,000 aircraft movements a year.

The environmental impact assessment of a third runway should be completed at the end of this year or by early next.

The restricted area at the north of the airport will be extended to minimize the impact on the Chinese white dolphins, Hui said.

Green Sense spokesman Roy Tam Hoi-pong slammed the authority for failing to detail the impact of seven reclamation projects in Lantau.

Samantha Lee Mei-wah, of WWF Hong Kong, said the assessment should address whether reclamation will further reduce the number of dolphins.

Professional Commons policy convener Albert Lai Kwong-tak said the assessment is limited and will fail to assess the social impact of a runway.

The Professional Commons, together with Friends of the Earth and Hong Kong Dolphin Conservation Society, has begun a study into the effects of a third runway. It has asked British think-tank New Economics Foundation to offer advice.
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Old September 12th, 2013, 04:58 AM   #209
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Push for runway as criticism rejected
The Standard

Thursday, September 12, 2013

A third runway will be able to cope with heavier air traffic, the Civil Aviation Department says.

Its assistant director-general, Manuel Sum Siu-wah, rejected criticism that Heathrow Airport in London, which has two runways, can handle a maximum of more than 80 flights an hour while Hong Kong may manage only 68 flights an hour by 2015.

Capacity can be increased to 102 flights per hour if a third runway is built, according to a report by the Airport Authority.

Sum said Heathrow and Hong Kong airports are not comparable because of the mountainous terrain in the SAR.

"The obstacles around Heathrow Airport are all below 500 feet, while there are many high points surrounding the Hong Kong airport, all of them above 1,000 feet," Sum said.

He said a previous claim that the airport could reach a maximum of 80 flights, made in a 1991 consultation, was an ideal number assuming there were no terrain constraints.

Sum also said the "high wall" between Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta is not the reason for Hong Kong being unable to handle more traffic, as certain altitudes have been set for Hong Kong and mainland aircraft.

"Since 2005, the transition altitude has been lowered from 15,700 feet to 12,800 feet from 11pm to 7am for aircraft to fly through," he said.

There was also criticism that flights are affected by restrictions on the mainland.

Sum said: "Though departure flights are occasionally affected by flow-control restrictions, the proportion is low."

The runway capacity has increased from 40 flights per hour in 1999 to 64 flights now.

It will reach maximum capacity of 68 by 2015.

There are about 1,200 departures and arrivals each day.
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Old September 15th, 2013, 03:54 PM   #210
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Seatbelts for third runway landing
13 September 2013
China Daily - Hong Kong Edition

The main trouble with our legislators' freebie to France with Cathay Pacific is that somebody opened their big mouth about it. And now we know who, where, what, when and how - the only part of the jigsaw with the slightest tinge of doubt about it is why. Frankly, Cathay's supposed reason - to "introduce" them to the Airbus 330 and visit the Airbus factory because Cathay intends to change to an all-Airbus fleet - is a bit airy-fairy.

It is no surprise to learn that our lawmakers have been accepting free trips from airlines since 2005, to mark such events as the delivery of a new jetliner or the opening of a new route, theoretically gaining a better grasp of aviation development and its latest technical advances.

We also learned from neo-democrat Gary Fan Kwok-wai, who was not invited and may have been suffering from a mild attack of sour grapes, that "it was rare" for Cathay to invite only some of the lawmakers. The inference here is that in previous cases the airline has invited all members of the Legislative Council (LegCo) - but, if that really did happen, nobody blabbed about it afterwards. Fan added that "lawmakers should judge prudently whether to accept such an invitation, to avoid giving the public the impression that they will benefit from the trip."

Claudia Mo Man-ching pointed out that none of the six Civic Party legislators was invited - which, in a way, could be interpreted as an inverted compliment. She added that the guest list gave a false impression because "they accepted the invitation as lawmakers yet took along their families". The same point also peeved her colleague Professor Kenneth Chan Ka-lok: "Visiting an Airbus factory is a business trip and it's inappropriate for the family to tag along".

Let's get down to basics. First, there is absolutely nothing wrong with Cathay Pacific offering free "jollies" to anybody it chooses. Second, if we are absolutely honest about it, there is hardly one of us who wouldn't have put up his or her hand for a free return ticket to Paris or any other Cathay destination, especially if we were to be wined and dined in Business Class there and back. Third, if, for reasons of courtesy or whatever, Cathay chose to invite the politicians' spouses, too, that's their prerogative.

But each and every one of those legislators is, for the term of his or her office, in a position of trust and honor to serve the Hong Kong public to the best of their ability, and should therefore be bound not to be swayed or influenced in any way in future decision-making on subjects involving Cathay, or the aviation industry generally.

Right now Cathay is involved in a bitter fight to protect its interests against an attempt by the family of Macao casino czar, Stanley Ho Hung-sun, to horn into the Hong Kong budget airline bonanza via an aerial interloper from Australia named Jetstar, the cheap younger brother of the Australian national carrier Qantas. Leveraging on their conglomerate, Shun Tak Holdings, Ho has moved with dizzying speed on the deal, plunking down a cool $66 million into Jetstar from its previous 50-50 owners, Qantas and China Eastern Airlines, registering Jetstar Hong Kong, lodging an application with the Hong Kong government for an aviation license to operate out of Hong Kong, and getting Ho's daughter Pansy Ho Chiu-king appointed the new airline's chairman. (Ms Ho is already Shun Tak's managing director.)

Cathay Pacific is 43 percent owned by the Swire conglomerate, with the next biggest investor being the State-owned Chinese flag carrier Air China with 30 percent.

In total, 83 airlines operate from Hong Kong International Airport, which in 2012 handled 56 million passengers. The airport is also the world's busiest for cargo traffic, handling 4 million tons last year. Cathay is the airport's biggest user, flying from Hong Kong to 51 destinations.

In March last year, after a painstaking study of future requirements, the Airport Authority decided that a third runway was needed. Obviously the key factor in this decision was the assumption that still more airlines, including airfreight providers, would wish to fly to and from Hong Kong. The decision also affected Cathay's future planning, and the airline plans to buy 50 Airbus aircraft over the next eight years, taking full advantage of the extra runway.

As Hong Kong's flag carrier, and with its long-standing record of serving Hong Kong since soon after the end of World War II in 1945, Cathay should, on the one hand, be entitled to expect some preferential treatment from the government but, on the other, not want new rivals frozen out of opportunities, especially if they will offer cheaper fares. Why go to the expense of building a third runway if its use is to be restricted? And if airlines are to dictate policy, why have an Airport Authority?

Albert Lin is a PR and media consultant.
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Old November 19th, 2013, 04:25 AM   #211
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Feud goes sky high
The Standard
Tuesday, November 19, 2013

A fierce feud broke out yesterday between the Airport Authority's two top guns during a board meeting on a site to be reserved for the driverless electric train system of the proposed third runway.

Authority chairman Marvin Cheung Kin-tung wants to use the temporary golf site at the northeastern tip of the airport as a depot of the train system.

But Vincent Lo Hong-sui, chairman of the authority's Infrastructural Planning Committee, or IPC, wants to relocate the depot to give more space for commercial development.

Things turned nasty at yesterday's board meeting, with Lo calling on the government to intervene.

The pair's differences of opinions actually surfaced in January when Lo, a strong supporter of Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, was first appointed to the authority.

According to a source close to the authority, Lo and Cheung do not see eye to eye and often clash over issues.

The depot-relocation issue seems trivial but shows the bad feeling between the two rivals. The clash "shouldn't have reached their level," the source said, adding that it is "only too personal."

The situation points to a high-level management power struggle which first emerged after Lo verbally resigned as IPC chairman earlier this month. An authority spokesperson last night confirmed that Lo has verbally resigned but said a final decision has yet to be made.

Cheung was appointed board chairman by former chief executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen. His term was extended for one more
year and on October 25 the government announced that his chairmanship will be extended from June 2014 to June 2015.

During yesterday's meeting Lo had stopped Cheung just seconds before he was to endorse his plan for the depot.

Cheung claims that the third runway could be delayed for between three and 12 months if the depot has to be relocated.

He wants the golf course site to be used for various facilities - not only for the rail system but also for the airlines.

He says the depot for the driverless electric trains should be built underground.

There were rumors that the chief executive wants Lo to take over as board chairman and, according to a source, he acted as if he was already confirmed as the future chairman.

To the surprise of industry observers, Cheung's contract was extended for one more year.

The same day that the chairman's extension was announced, the authority's chief executive Stanley Hui Hon-chung also announced his resignation, with effect from next July.

Observers believe Hui's decision to call it quits was driven by the infighting at the top.
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Old November 20th, 2013, 03:54 AM   #212
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Airport top gun quits chair in row over site
The Standard
Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Vincent Lo Hong-sui confirmed yesterday he has resigned as chairman of the Airport Authority's Infrastructural Planning Committee because of a difference in views on the use of a site at the northeastern tip of the airport.
But Lo said he is still a member of the authority.

It had been suggested earlier he was a potential successor to authority chairman Marvin Cheung Kin-tung.

Cheung had suggested the site be used as a depot for a train system but Lo felt it would be better used for commercial purposes.

"Seeing its immense potential, I suggested developing it as a commercial center when the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao bridge comes into use," Lo said.

He said consultant studies showed the depot could be relocated, though this could delay the environmental evaluation report by three to six months and increase the construction cost of the third runway.

In his resignation letter dated November 4, Lo wrote: "I apologize for not being able to chair the IPC meeting of November 1 to your satisfaction. The meeting, however, did bring out the differences on our views and approach to the land use issue for the Airport Authority."

Lo said he had reservations about the attitudes and competence of some senior management members.

"Your overwhelming stance and behavior at the meeting yesterday made me realize that it would not be possible for me to make a contribution to or perform in my role as chairman of IPC in an effective manner," Lo said in the letter.

He admitted having different views to management, "but I don't think all the management disagreed with me."

He said he resigned because he "doesn't want to block the way."

"I have known Cheung for a long time and respect him for his professional knowledge, experience and personality. We still talk to each other, even after the meeting yesterday. We hope to seek a better proposal."

He said Cheung tried to retain him, but Lo refused.
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Old November 20th, 2013, 01:48 PM   #213
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hong kong tour

hong kong tour and my name is jazz markey and we are enjoy it with full enjoy
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Old November 21st, 2013, 04:13 AM   #214
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11/9

image hosted on flickr

20131109 Tung Chung 63 by nzwalker2, on Flickr
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Old December 10th, 2013, 01:43 PM   #215
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Seize moment for airport expansion
The Standard
Monday, December 09, 2013

The current debate surrounding the proposed third runway at Hong Kong International Airport has focused on the potential impact it will have on the environment. While environmental lobby groups, along with residents living near the airport, have raised valid concerns in terms of the potential impact on local ecology, noise disturbance and air quality, the overall need to have this third runway seems equally valid.

Not only is HKIA a major air transportation hub, it is also vital to the territory's continued prosperity as an economic powerhouse. It benefits everyone in Hong Kong, not just airline passengers or those who ship cargo.

The airport also generates vital benefits through connections created between cities and markets that enable foreign direct investment, business development and other spillover benefits that help Hong Kong thrive as a place to do business and to live.

Currently, aviation is worth HK$88.90 billion in the SAR, representing 5.5 percent of our GDP and this rises to 8.2 percent, if the sector's contribution to tourism is included.

UK-based Oxford Economics recently estimated that a 10 percent improvement in air transport connectivity, relative to GDP, would see a HK$1 billion per annum increase in GDP in the long run for the Hong Kong economy.

But at what price will these vital benefits come and at what expense to the environment?

Undoubtedly, aviation, like every other industry, has an environmental impact. It currently accounts for 2 percent of manmade greenhouse gas emissions globally. But it is also an industry which is fully committed to reducing this impact.

Airlines are investing heavily in the very latest technology.

Take, for instance, the Airbus A380 which is already serving Hong Kong.

It is one of the world's largest aircraft that is also the quietest. Also, new aircraft designs, including the Boeing 787 and Airbus A350-XWB, utilize advanced materials such as carbon fiber, making them lighter - reducing fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions, by up to 28 percent, when compared to older generation aircraft.

Overall, today's aircraft are 70 percent more fuel efficient than the early jets and they have lower emissions. New aircraft are also progressively quieter than those in service even a decade ago. Indeed, through technological advancements, the industry has managed to reduce overall noise by 75 percent since the early 1960s.

Last October, aviation became the first global sector to have its post-2020 carbon dioxide emissions regulated by the United Nations - something the industry had been calling for since 2008. And back in 2009 it also pledged to have neutral carbon growth from 2020.

Airlines have been preparing for this fundamental change to their business, setting carbon dioxide reduction targets.

A case in point is Cathay Pacific, which has been one of the most aggressive in this area. In line with UN recommendations, Cathay aims for a 31 percent reduction in CO2/Revenue Tonne Kilometer, or a 2 percent average year-on-year fuel efficiency improvement.

Far from being the pariah that some have suggested, sustainability has become central to the industry's future and is playing its part in addressing one of the most pressing challenges of our time - global climate change.

For Hong Kong, there is much to consider. The airport environmental impact assessment will soon be published and the public debate will rightly focus on the importance of preserving our environment.

The Airport Authority Hong Kong must take the necessary steps required to ensure that any expansion should be undertaken in a way that minimizes overall environmental impact.

The key is "mitigation" and the authority must follow the recommendations of the report in terms of addressing major environmental issues.

But we must also ensure that we seize the opportunity to provide for a sustainable future for Hong Kong and recognize the vital importance that aviation plays in our economy and society.

Without a thriving aviation hub, our city will suffer. Without trade and investment, we will be unable to support initiatives that promote biodiversity, conservation and the environment. This will result in Hong Kong losing out to growing competition from emerging markets.

Rather than growth at any price, as some environmentalists believe to be the case regarding the third runway, we need responsible and sustainable growth that respects the environment and mitigates any potential adverse impact.

Expanding HKIA now will help to provide the necessary foundation to guarantee our future success and strengthen our position in the world economy - something that will ultimately be of benefit to all of us. Joe Ng is vice chairman, Board of Airline Representatives, Hong Kong
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Old December 27th, 2013, 07:24 PM   #216
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Any ideas as to the total gross floor space of the proposed new concourses? How much bigger will the airport get in terms of floor space?
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Old December 29th, 2013, 08:42 AM   #217
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kunming tiger View Post
Any ideas as to the total gross floor space of the proposed new concourses? How much bigger will the airport get in terms of floor space?
You can check the airport's website. Thought I had replied the same info before.

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Old January 8th, 2014, 10:46 AM   #218
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Terminal growth
Third runway ‘takes priority over depot’

6 January 2014
South China Morning Post

Airport Authority chairman argues expansion is most important after dispute among board members over plans for key development site

The proposed third runway should take priority over commercial development at the airport, Airport Authority chairman Marvin Cheung Kin-tung said in his first media interview since a split emerged in the authority’s board over plans for a key development site.

The board voted unanimously last week in favour of building a train depot on the site of a temporary golf course, a location some board members had wanted to use purely for a shopping and hotel development. Board member Vincent Lo Hong-sui had threatened to quit the board over the issue but changed his stance after learning that moving the railway depot would delay the third runway by a year.

“According to the Airport Authority Ordinance, the first [purpose] of the authority is to develop the airport. The provision of other facilities is secondary. This says building the airport should always be our main task,” Cheung told the South China Morning Post.

He said Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying had been kept informed about the authority’s discussions. Lo is a Leung supporter.

The row broke out in November when Lo tendered his resignation as chairman of the authority’s infrastructural planning committee after the authority’s management insisted the depot for the driverless electric train that will service the new runway should be located under the commercial development. Lo argued that the depot would reduce by billions of dollars the value of the 120,000 square metre site between Terminal Two and the AsiaWorld-Expo complex.

The authority said moving the depot closer to the new runway would delay the environmental impact assessment on the controversial runway plan, which is being fought by environmentalists who claim reclamation work will destroy the habitat of the rare Chinese white dolphin.

All board members, including government officials, accepted the argument that the cost of delaying the runway, work on which is due to begin in 2015, could vastly outweigh the reduction in the value of the commercial plan.

“It’s true that [keeping the depot] will discount the land value,” Cheung said. “But do you know how much the cost of the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge increased after its tender was delayed for a year? With the runway project costing more than HK$130 billion, can you estimate how much more we would have to pay if it was delayed for a year?”

The government had estimated that the 10-month delay in the HK$58 billion bridge project, the result of a judicial review application, had pushed costs up by HK$6.5 billion. The increase was blamed on rising material costs and a higher risk induced by a tighter schedule.

Cheung said moving the depot would delay the new runway by a year, rather than the three to six months suggested by Lo.

And he said he would do all he could to keep Lo on the board and as head of the infrastructure committee. Lo has been tipped as a possible successor to Cheung, whose tenure was extended for 12 months last year. He added the matter was never personal.

“It is a very important matter that requires detailed discussion,” he said. “We should not make an impetuous decision … There could be misunderstanding. It is a complicated issue that takes time to understand.

“I have never been opposed to any idea [being raised] or lobbied anyone to support the management. My role is to facilitate the discussion so that both sides of arguments can be heard.”
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Old January 19th, 2014, 06:01 PM   #219
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East coast of airport island - for the Macau & Zhuhai bridge entry point (12/19) :

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Old January 27th, 2014, 11:21 AM   #220
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Mid-field Terminal
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