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Old November 25th, 2003, 07:44 PM   #1
rj2uman
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The Outer Islands!

Please? Any one care to share some? Even ones of Sentosa are acceptable.
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Old November 26th, 2003, 02:42 PM   #2
huaiwei
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Eh....wonder why nobody replied to this earlier.....have to dig up some photos...same are rather dated thou, so no guarantee they still look the same today.

Pulau Ubin in 1992






View to the mainland


The Town Centre



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"My Settlement of Singapore continues to thrive most wonderfully - it is all and everything I could wish and, if no untimely fate awaits it, promises to become the Emporium and the pride of the East" - Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, 10th September 1820
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Old November 26th, 2003, 02:46 PM   #3
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More....







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"My Settlement of Singapore continues to thrive most wonderfully - it is all and everything I could wish and, if no untimely fate awaits it, promises to become the Emporium and the pride of the East" - Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, 10th September 1820
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Old November 26th, 2003, 02:55 PM   #4
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Pulau Sakeng in 1993









For the record, Pulau Sakeng is now part of Pulau Semakau....collectively forming an offshore rubbish dumb!
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"My Settlement of Singapore continues to thrive most wonderfully - it is all and everything I could wish and, if no untimely fate awaits it, promises to become the Emporium and the pride of the East" - Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, 10th September 1820

Last edited by huaiwei; November 26th, 2003 at 03:03 PM.
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Old November 26th, 2003, 03:08 PM   #5
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More...


The police station




The bathroom


Demolition...


bye-bye...
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"My Settlement of Singapore continues to thrive most wonderfully - it is all and everything I could wish and, if no untimely fate awaits it, promises to become the Emporium and the pride of the East" - Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, 10th September 1820
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Old November 26th, 2003, 03:21 PM   #6
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This is PULAU UBIN!

I took it from a plane
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Old November 26th, 2003, 03:37 PM   #7
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Wow....you actually managed to capture the entire island in one photo.
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"My Settlement of Singapore continues to thrive most wonderfully - it is all and everything I could wish and, if no untimely fate awaits it, promises to become the Emporium and the pride of the East" - Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, 10th September 1820
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Old November 26th, 2003, 04:01 PM   #8
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hmmmm......the island looks flat in Cliff's picture

I recall that the island actually had some hills........maybe my memory is getting rusty as I visited the island back in 1994
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Old November 26th, 2003, 07:43 PM   #9
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i had some sentosa pics from my trip to Singapore last 2001. i dunno if it's still in my hard drive though.. or in my imagestation

Sentosa anyone?


EDIT: i found one.. unfortunately it has me in it
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Old November 26th, 2003, 10:28 PM   #10
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Cool everyone!! Thanks for sharing!!
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Old November 27th, 2003, 01:42 AM   #11
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Not finished. I'm also trying to dig up pics. Meanwhile here is some info...

Besides the theme-park delights and luxury hotels of Sentosa Island, Singapore has several outlying islands that are less developed and less crowded. They're great places to swim, sunbathe or even set up camp amid peaceful and natural surroundings.

KUSU ISLAND
According to legend, this island was once a giant turtle that transformed itself into a huge rock to help save shipwrecked sailors. Today, the island is still embedded in various beliefs and rituals. Taoists make their annual pilgrimage to the Toa Pekong Temple near the ferry jetty during the ninth month of the Chinese lunar calendar.

Malays visit Kramat Kusu, which is located on the top of a hill. The kramat, or shrine, is dedicated to Syed Abdul Rahman, his mother Nenek Ghalib and his sister Puteri Fatimah. It is common for childless couples hoping to have children to visit this shrine, where they leave white cloths tied to the nearby trees as a token of the sincerity of their prayers.



If you're neither Taoist nor wishing to have kids, you can always kick back and relax on a beach. The beaches at Kusu Island have changing rooms, toilets, picnic spots and swimming areas.

Admission to the island, which includes the ferry charges, is SGD9 for adults and SGD6 for children. Ferries from the World Trade Centre depart twice daily from Mondays to Saturdays, and six times a day on Sundays and public holidays. The ferries stop at St John's Island as well. Call 826-8322 and 275-0388 for more information.

ST JOHN'S ISLAND
This island has several good beaches for swimming, and provides changing rooms, toilets, picnic spots and swimming areas. It is a popular as a weekend getaway and for camping trips, but you wish for something closer to civilisation there are always colonial bungalows that you can rent. Check with the ticket counter at the World Trade Centre.

Admission to the island, which includes the ferry charges, is SGD9 for adults and SGD6 for children. Ferries from the World Trade Centre depart twice daily from Mondays to Saturdays, and six times a day on Sundays and public holidays. The ferries stop at Kusu Island as well. Call 826-8322 and 275-0388 for more information.



PULAU UBIN
This mangrove island has become highly popular as a weekend retreat and offers an interesting variety of activities and sights. You can rent a bike and go mountain-biking on the rocky trails all over the island, go swimming, or camp the night. You can also see traditional fishing villages, prawn and fish farms, Chinese temples and limestone quarries. The seafood restaurants here are good, too.


Pulau Ubin, left more or less undeveloped for the last 30 years, is home to many interesting flora and fauna.You can also take a survival course from the adventure school Outward Bound here. See out Eco-Travel and Adventure section for more details.

To get to Pulau Ubin, take an exotic bum-boat ride for SGD1.50 from Changi jetty.

SISTERS ISLAND
Sisters Island is good for swimming, snorkelling and scuba diving. You can also enjoy a picnic on the grass or the sandy beach. There is no regular ferry service to the island, however, so you will have to rent a water taxi (at SGD50 per hour) at Jardine Steps or Clifford Pier.
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Old November 27th, 2003, 01:51 AM   #12
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Pictures of KUSU ISLAND
http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/~desney/phot...usuIsland2003/





Board this boat to Kusu Island

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Old November 27th, 2003, 01:55 AM   #13
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SENTOSA

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Old November 27th, 2003, 05:48 AM   #14
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Raff you da man! That is some really interesting info! It is interesting to notice how "primitive" the islands seem compared to SG island itself.
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Old November 27th, 2003, 11:05 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally posted by rj2uman

Raff you da man! That is some really interesting info! It is interesting to notice how "primitive" the islands seem compared to SG island itself.
Hahaha....in a sense they are a world all of their own. However, things has changed rapidly in the last 5 years.....not sure if its always in the right direction. The biggest off-shore community was once on Pulau Tekong, the largest Island, but by the time I went there for military service in 1999, all I saw was human settlements puried under nature, or a ghost town even. There are no zero residents there.

Over at Ubin, all of them have been moved to the mainland about 1-2 years ago. We had a little photo essay of that event somewhere in this forums. Th little town centre is still there, albeit it is more like catering to the visitors rather then the resident population like never before.

Gone too, are practically every other offshore island settlements, Those I showed further up....well......they simply do not exist anymore. They have either been turned into off shore industrial lands, or a rubbish dumb, especially for the south-western Islands. Er....anyone have a map??

That's the long and short of it. There are quite a few more interesting ones. Will post about them soon.
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Old November 27th, 2003, 11:55 AM   #16
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Southern exposure

Untouched, unspoilt, undeveloped. A few of the Southern Islands are ideal for those wanting to get away from city life for a day - and you don't even need a passport

By Ginnie Teo
CONSUMER CORRESPONDENT

FORGET about visiting the beaches at Bintan or Phuket, or taking a ferry to Desaru for a suntan.

Civilisation remains in the distance at Sisters' Island, on which only sounds to be heard are those of birds chirping and the occasional passing oil tanker. There are no regular ferries to the two near-identical islands and you have to charter your own bumboat.


The islands' only inhabitants are always on hand to greet you and, hopefully, some of your snacks


Leave your passport behind, avoid the hassle of clearing immigration and just hop onto a bumboat to one of Singapore's Southern Islands.

Just 40 minutes away by sea, this sprinkling of pristine islands have been left untouched by the authorities and forgotten by Singaporeans.

There are more than 30 islands of varying shapes and sizes located south of the main island of Singapore. Some, such as St John's, Seringat and Lazarus, are being developed into island resorts or nature parks.

The others, such as Sisters' Island and Pulau Hantu, are being left as they are.

Sentosa Development Corporation (SDC) manages and maintains nine of them, but of these, only four - Kusu, St John's, Sisters' and Pulau Hantu - are open to visitors.

There are ferry services to Kusu and St John's, but if you want privacy, then it is Pulau Hantu and Sisters' Island you should head for, like The Straits Times did.

Both are about 40 minutes' away by bumboat.

Jetties and basic amenities have been set up on both to encourage more to drop in. But you will have to bring your own food and drinks, as there are no shops at either.

SDC has installed two toilets, lots of park benches, dustbins, barbecue pits and shelters on each. It also cleans them up regularly and maintains the islands' green spots and water supply for the toilets. There may even be a regular ferry service to Sisters' soon.

One person who has visited Sisters' is Ms Janice Wong, 31, a marketing manager. She went there with a group of friends about two months ago.

She said: 'The place is so peaceful and tranquil, it's hard to imagine it's part of Singapore. It seems like a deserted island.'

The only way out to the pair, apparently named because of the legend about two sisters drowning at sea years ago, is to rent a bumboat - which seats 12 - for a day from the boatmen at Clifford Pier. Most are old men and can be found near the Customs checkpoint at the pier.

Agree on a price for the two-way trip before jumping onto a vessel.

It should be about $160 for a full day.

The journey takes you past Pulau Brani, Sentosa, Kusu and St John's islands.

Your destination is clear, even from a distance, as the islands sit side by side, bearing a striking resemblance to each other. The larger is called Pulau Subar Laut, and the smaller Pulau Subar Darat. Each has its own jetty.

Their only permanent inhabitants: A large group of monkeys, which invariably greet all visitors, and loiter around the dustbins, near the toilets and on the beach. But they generally leave people alone.

Do not feed them, as the many signs request, as it will make the animals dependent on humans for food.

They subsist on berries and small fruit growing in the secondary forest that covers most of the bigger of the two islands.

The dense collection of plants, made up mostly of casuarina trees and sea hibiscus that sough softly when a breeze blows, has a forbidding look, but the SDC assures visitors that there are no snakes there.

So if you have the inclination, you could explore the area.

The islands cover an area of 7.9 ha altogether, and half an hour is about all the time a visitor needs to circle the whole of the bigger one, which has a paved walkway.

For some respite from the sun, you could take shelter in one of the 19 roofed huts made of wood dotting both islands.

The picnic sets comprise two long seats and an attached table top, so eating a meal can be done comfortably here, just like at the Pasir Ris and East Coast beaches.

They are also perfect for those wanting to stretch out for a snooze, but trying to avoid lying on the ground.

Take your pick of one of four lagoons to swim in and lounge around at.

The beaches have clean, light brown sand, and lots of place for basking, while the water is mostly clear, save for the odd coconut husk.

Barbecue pits are installed near the lagoons, and there are taps near them too, making cleaning up after a meal convenient.

There is fish aplenty in the water, and you may spot some shrimp and crabs too. The only sounds to interrupt a visit there are the birds chirping and the occasional growl from a passing oil tanker.

The two toilets on the islands have showers attached and are amazingly clean, perhaps because they are seldom used. You will even find toilet paper in each cubicle.

Administration assistant Wilson Lee has spent time at the beach there with his family. He said: 'It's convenient because of the basic amenities. The kids like it because they can swim and barbecue.'

You have two islands again at Pulau Hantu - Pulau Hantu Besar and Pulau Hantu Kechil, which sit across from each other. These are slightly bigger than Sisters' Island.

There are no plans, however, to have a ferry plying to the islands. A two-way bumboat ride there from the West Coast ferry terminal, near the West Coast Park, will cost $100 to $140.

Pulau Hantu has the same amenities as Sisters' Island. But instead of a forest, it has a large mangrove swamp.

At low tide, you can watch hermit crabs digging, shrimp dancing and mudskippers jumping from one mudflat to another.

Visitors can spend a whole afternoon exploring the swamp. But they will have to do it face-down, to catch all the action going on. If you are lucky, you may even spot a starfish buried in the ground.

Pulau Hantu is popular with divers too, as the seabed around the island is shallow and flat, and safe as a training and recreational spot for newcomers to the activity.

Some visitors have also reported seeing dolphins frolicking in the distance.

As with Sisters' Island, coconut palms and trees have been planted everywhere, making the place shady.

Cranes, herons and magpies are some of the migratory birds which inhabit the island during certain times of the year.

You can also camp on the two sets of islands if you have permission from the SDC.

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Old November 27th, 2003, 12:13 PM   #17
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Coral reefs of Singapore

The coral reefs in Singapore are found skirting many of the islands south of mainland Singapore. These comprise fringing and patch reefs.




There were once over 60 offshore islands and patch reefs around Singapore, most of which were situated south of mainland Singapore. However, since the mid 1970s, major land reclamation was carried out on the mainland as well as the offshore southern islands. Most of the southern islands were reclaimed, adding 1695 ha to Singapore's total land area. Some islands were merged as a result. The reef flats of many islands e.g. Pulau Sudong, Pulau Hantu and Kusu Island were reclaimed right up to the reef slope. Many of the coral reef organisms were smothered by the reclamation, while others were severely affected by the resulting increase in water turbidity. Since 1986, most coral reefs in Singapore have lost up to 65% of their live coral cover
The high turbidity of our waters restrict light penetration and reef life ends at a depth of only 12m, marking the lower growth limit for hermatypic corals. Sedimentation rates ranged from 3-6mg/cm2/day in 1979. In 1994, these increased to 5-45mg/cm2/day (the higher value obtained from localised areas close to reclamation projects). This reduced visibility from 10m in the 1960s to 2m or less today. As a consequence, the reef is very compact, as opposed to reefs in clear waters, which can be found at depths of 20m and more.

Life on our reefs
Contrary to the belief that our reefs have been permanently devastated, they still support rich marine life. The reefs in Singapore harbour close to 200 species of hard corals from 55 genera, which given the size of the reefs and conditions present here, compare favourably with coral species richness in the more extensive reefs of the region. Singapore reefs sustain good diversity of other marine organisms too, such as gorgonians (Goh et al 1997) and nudibranchs. So far, 111 reef fish species from 30 families were also recorded.



The reef can be subdivided into several zones: the reef flat, the reef crest and the reef slope.

The shoreline gives way to the shallow reef flat that may vary in width and depth - at very low tides, some parts of the reef flat are exposed to air and direct sunlight. Here, scattered about are small colonies of boulder-shaped knob corals (Favia), maze coral (Platygyra sp.) and sponges of different colours. Pockets of sandy areas may be surrounded by lawns of large brown algae Sargassum sp. Bands of black sea urchins gather in large numbers. This level also marks the outer edge of the reef flat, which gives way to the reef crest.

Marine life on the reef crest is usually the richest - almost every type of coral is represented: the brain corals (Family Mussidae), bubble-corals (Family Caryophyllidae), pore corals (Family Poritidae), mushroom corals (Family Fungidae), cauliflower coral (Pocillopora sp), cave corals and disc coral (Family Dendrophyllidae), the table and staghorn corals (Acropora sp.), anemone corals (Goniopora sp)and many others. Living among these corals are many other marine animals. Deep purple-coloured sea anemones, with their symbiotic clownfish are a common sight. Crinoids (feather stars) are cryptic by day, and hide in coral crevices. Attached on the reef substrata are the sponges, sea squirts (tunicates), feather-duster worms and stinging hydroids. The other more mobile reef residents are the cowries, cone shells, nudibranchs, shrimps and crabs may be found in the crevices of the reef.



No other marine habitat supports such numbers or diversity of fishes as coral reefs. Most reef fishes adopt bright colouration, curious body shapes and habits. They not only add much vibrancy to the reef, but also are important contributors in almost all levels of the coral reef ecosystem. The most diverse and abundant fishes in Singapore reefs are the damselfishes (Family Pomacentridae) and wrasses (Family Labridae). Other common reef fishes are the copperband butterflyfish (Chelomon rostratus) and vermiculated angelfish (Chaetodontoplus mesoleucus).

Some of the reef fishes are economically important as food fish. These include the groupers (Family Serranidae), snappers (Family Lutjanidae), scads and trevallies (Family Carangidae).

As the upper reef slope gives way to the lower reef slope at about 7 to 8m depth, the density of marine organisms decreases. Coral boulders are scattered, separated by coral rubble, sand and silt. Occasionally, one comes across some sea urchins, crinoids, gobies, goatfishes and mushroom corals, the Neptune-cup sponges and brilliantly coloured sea-fans.


The sea floor of many reefs in Singapore is usually silty. Long sea whips and smaller sea fans are common. A few isolated colonies of corals still grow at these depths, but most of these are ahermatypic which do not possess the symbiotic zooxanthellae, and hence able to colonise the darker parts of the reef.



Threats to Singapore reefs
The most significant cause of reef degradation in Singapore is sedimentation. Land reclamation, dredging of shipping channels and dumping of earth spoils, have increased the sediment load. Loss of coral reefs to land reclamation occurred along the southwest coast of the mainland and on some of the offshore southern islands. Increased sedimentation affected the remaining reefs in two ways 1) by causing a slow but steady reduction in live coral cover 2) by reducing the lower depth limit of coral growth on reef slopes. Surveys since 1986 indicated that live coral cover decreased by up to 20% on some reefs, although other reefs registered no impact. The reduction in sunlight penetration reduced the lower depth limit of coral growth. In the 1970s, coral growth extended to 10m down the reef slope. Today, growth is restricted to 6m although some coral species still occur at the 8m depth.

Accidental oil spills remain as an ever-present threat. However the 1997 Evoikos oil spill (27,000 tonnes) did not seriously affect coral reefs, although oil contaminated the upper parts of some reef flats.

Other activities that also have an impact on the reefs include recreational and tourist-related use. Negligent or inexperienced divers without proper buoyancy control, leave a trail of broken corals. Anchor damage is caused by fishing boats and pleasure craft. At Pulau Hantu, a popular dive spot, courtesy mooring buoys have been installed to prevent further anchor damage.

The 1998 coral bleaching event
As with coral reefs around the world, Singapore reefs suffered a mass bleaching event in June 1998. Sea temperatures around Pulau Hantu and St John's were elevated by 1-2 deg C from March to June 1998. 50-90% of all reef organisms in Singapore were affected, particularly the hard corals,
soft corals and anemones. The bleaching effect extended till 6m, the lower
growth depth limit for coral growth locally. Sea temperatures returned to normal in August 1998. A study of the stressed colonies was undertaken during this period. 10 out of 35 coral colonies died from the stress, and the genera Sinularia and Euphyllia were most affected. Other colonies showed various signs of stress, such as growth of turf algae and silt accumulation, leading to partial mortality.

Loads more pictures can be found here
http://coralreef.nus.edu.sg/gallery/main.htm
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Old November 27th, 2003, 12:41 PM   #18
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Think I'll help you guys a little.Go here http://www.a2o.com.sg/public/search/index.html
and type the name of the island you want a photo of.

Old photos of Pulau Tekong:




Now it has been turned into a military training area.
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Old November 27th, 2003, 02:00 PM   #19
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that first photo of Sentosa raffles posted was from the cable car, i think
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Old November 28th, 2003, 04:28 AM   #20
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Even more information!! WOW! Very interesting!
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