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Old May 19th, 2009, 01:35 AM   #221
Mars Uy
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What are you doing? : Nag-aano ka?

Where are you? : Hain ka?

When? : San-o

How are you? - Kumusta ka?

Come in! : Kadi sulod!

I miss you : Mahidlaw na haim

I love you : Guinhihigugma ta ikaw

Go away! : Iwas daw!

Friend : Sangkay

Enemy : Kaaway
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Old May 25th, 2009, 08:06 PM   #222
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Waraynon Ako by Acidradio


" Waraynon gud ako, Kankabato it ak bungto! Ayaw pagprubare kay diri mapapirdi! "
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Old June 13th, 2009, 05:24 PM   #223
carl_vilches21
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Tacloban is a "Waray" speaking city. The dialect is officially called "Leyte-Samarnon". Majority speaks English and Tagalog.

Some Waray-Waray Phrases:
Good Morning - Maupay nga aga
Good Afternoon - Maupay nga kulop
Good Evening - Maupay nga gab-i
Thank You - Salamat
Yes / No - Oo / Diri
Tomorrow - Buwas
Morning / Evening - Aga / Gab-i
Breakfast / Lunch - Pamahaw / Pani-udto
What is your name? - Ano it imo ngaran?
My name is ... - Ako hi...
Left / Right/ Straight - Wala / Tu'o / Diretso
Stop - Para
Near / Far - Harani / Harayo
Yesterday - Kakulop
Today - Yana nga adlaw
How much is it? - Tagpira?
Expensive - Mahal
Cheap - Barato
Where Can I buy? - Hain ako makapalit hin...
Beautiful (Woman) - Mahusay
Handsome (Man) - Guwapo
Who - Hin'o
What - Ano
Why - Kay ano
Where - Ha-in
When - San-0
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Old July 2nd, 2009, 06:29 AM   #224
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Sangyaw Festival Theme



Tara na upod na,
ipakita an pagkaurusa.
Saragyaw ngan karanta,
aton na ini tadna.
Kanan mga Taclobanon,
ini nga selebrasyon.
Mga anak han kankabato,
nagdadayaw han Sto. Niño.

It lingganay han aton kalipay,
ipudyong ha ngatanan.
Ipasamwak ha bug-os nga kalibutan,
nga marasiyo-risyohan an Tacloban

(Sangyaw!) ______ kita
(Sangyaw!) pagkarapot kita
(Sangyaw!) ini an sayaw ngadto ha kauswagan
(Sangyaw!) makita hira
(Sangyaw!) nga kaya ta
(Sangyaw!) ini an sayaw tikadto han kadaugan
Sangyaw para han katawhan
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Old July 2nd, 2009, 09:04 AM   #225
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Discover Warock! Waray Rocks!

Must-listen waray songs

William Babiano - Kumusta ka, Leyte





Supremo - Sangkay


http://www.imeem.com/ayspeak/music/M...premo-sangkay/

Sangkay, kitaa it im kalibutan, hunahuna-a it im kabubuwason. It maupay nim buhaton, pag ampo ha Guinoo ngan pakig-urusa ha igkasi tawo



Exodus ft. Lil Trece - Tikang han Makaupod ka


http://www.imeem.com/kooldeezel/musi...n-makaupod-ka/

tikang han makaupod ka
malabad na "AKO" nagbag-o na
nagkaada hin kolor an masirom na kinabuhi
yana ikaw adi na ha akon..


Maglabad nga waray songs

Special Mammon - Moabites



Tahong ni Karla (sumikat ini ha bug-os nga Visayas)



Chubols 25 -Greenpeace

http://www.imeem.com/people/bCJIyH/m...ce-chubols-25/

Originally posted by urban_Iegend
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Old July 2nd, 2009, 09:18 AM   #226
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Dante Varona Jr.
Jerby Santos and the Guerillas

Lyrics:
Napungko ako dinhi

Kadamo man hit tamsi

Us’ kadupa nala ada langit na

An bukid han Danglay ha akon napaabaga nala

Nabati ako han haganas

Han dagat nga napawara hin kalas

Kahusay hit Santa Rita ngan Tacloban

Pero nahalanguhang it ak tiyan

Kay Ginbayaan mo ako ha pungkay han arko han San Juanico

It ak mata naglalabad, bangin ako magbaliskad

Nagdungan kita pagsaka, yana naguusa-an ako hit kakulba

Nakikita ko gad ikaw, pero harayo ka..

Malaksi nga nagkakawara it na mga barko para Manila

An sirak ha igbaw nagdidinga

Pero asul nga langit

it akon gingigihawa

Kay ginbayaan mo ako ha pungkay han arko han San Juanico

It ak mata naglalabad, bangin ako mag-Dante Varona

Nagdungan kita pagsaka, yana namumusag ako hit kakulba

Nakikita ko gad ikaw, pero harayo ka..

Kamingaw, kamingaw, pero mahusay gad ini nga adlaw

A Waray-Waray break-up song
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Old July 2nd, 2009, 11:15 AM   #227
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The Legend of Tacloban and Mt. Danglay
An Oral Tradition (usa nga Susumaton)

Copyrighted by Dulce Cuna Anacion




This Tale has been passed down to me by my late Mother, Dr. Rosa Ester T. Cuna, an English and Literature professor of UP Tacloban College, she said this is an oral tradition she gathered from Basey, Samar, where my Father’s relatives come from.

Long time ago when the island of Leyte (Tendaya island, named after a chieftain was still sparsely uninhabited, a young couple lived in the swampy shores of Kabatok, their livelihood was catching crabs and shellfish and crossing the Bay to a village in Samar island (Ibabao or Sibabao island, which to this day the village is named Basey), to sell in a “tabo”(market fair) in that village everyday.

Dang, was a strong fisherman, he was a tall, good-looking relative of the Bornean Datu Siagu of the southern side of Tendaya. His body was tattooed (“patik”) all over in the tradition of his tribe, he wore a loin cloth and was agile with the spear and machete he always carried with him. His other possessions were a “bangka” (small boat) and some “taklub”(basket traps for catching fish and crabs in shallow waters). His wife, Mulay was a weaver and basket maker. She made “taklub” to be sold in the Samar village during “tabo”. She was lithe, and agile too, her arms and legs were tattooed with motifs of birds and flowerets and crisscrossed with the patterns of basket weaving. The rest of her body was not tattooed, she wore a “tapis” of cloth made from the tapa bark, kind of bark found throughout the islands of South Pacific. Her chest was bare covered only with leis of shell and coconut. Her long hair was scrimped up into a bun called “tagonibaisat” and adorned with cloth and shell too. On special occasions, both Dang and Mulay would adorn themselves with gold earrings, necklaces and bracelets altogether with their shell leis to show off that they come from a noble lineage of the Datus. It was said that Gold was still found in the mountains of the island where they could fashion them into trinkets…

Dang and Mulay where childless. So their lives were dedicated to crab and shell gathering, and in some occasions pearl diving and gathering treasures from the sea…Mulay gathered the perennial grass that grew along in the swamp and made them to mats, baskets and cloth.

One day, Dang ventured into the bay that looped around the Kabatok area. The bay was filled with varieties of fish and crustaceans and perhaps, he said into himself, he would gather pearls to sell on the next “tabo”. His bangka reached far off the rim of the bay where the ocean floor inclined deep into the depths of the Pacific ocean. Here he took a dive and ventured into the fathoms..

Underneath, he was enveloped by shadows and noticed a whirl of sand in the ocean, schools of fish darted here and there as if in a frenzy. The ocean floor was moving!

Hurriedly yet curious, Dang tried to make out what the moving shadow was and to his great surprise it was a huge crab which measured three big “balanghays” (big seafaring boats that could accommodate families), and was big as a hill.

Dang swam hurriedly to the surface, rowed his bangka with speed to Kabatok and arrived so excited to tell his wife. They planned to catch the enormous creature for it would indeed be many meals for the coming months and its shell would be fashioned into utensils, weapons or adornment they could sell in the Ibabao markets. The couple built a crab basket to catch the creature that measured as high as a big hill. It was an enormous crab basket (taklub) in which they towed with their boat far into the Bay as a trap.

That night, lit by the fullness of the moon, they were able to capture the huge crab and they towed the big basket with all their might to the shore. They were so triumphant of their catch that they forgot one thing, a cover for the basket so that the creature could not climb out.

Exhausted with the towing, Dang and Mulay settled into a tired sleep beside the enormous taklub. The big sea crab with its huge legs and claws, climbed out of the taklub thru its uncovered opening on top…This woke the couple and Dang, attempting to kill it, threw his spear into the heart of the crab. Yet its shell was too hard that the spear broke. With its huge claws, the crab pinned the couple and dashed them against the rocks on the shore. The last sound that was heard was the scream of Mulay in her terror: “TAKLUBAAAAAAA!!!” (cover it).

The next day, the people in the nearby town of Basey who heard the screams ventured out with their bangkas to the site of Kabatok where the screams emanated. It was to their shock and horror that they beheld the mangled bodies of Dang and Mulay, an enormous broken down taklub and markings in the sand that told of a big creature that had gone down to the sea…

Whispers among them ensued that the couple had angered the Bay God Kabatok by trying to capture one of its Children. The townspeople carried the bodies of Dang and Mulay and buried them in the outskirts of their town in a ritual ceremony. They did not resort to sending the bodies off to the sea in a bangka and burning them there as in the normal tradition, for they were children that angered a sea God. Instead, they believed that burial in the earth to expiate them would be proper, and perhaps the God of the mountains, Ibabao, would pardon them consequently.

Years passed, the site where the bodies were buried grew into a mound, then a hill, then a mountain..a sign that Dang and Mulay were forgiven by the God Ibabao. The people started calling the mountain “Danglay” in honor of the tragic couple.

The swampy “sitio” where the couple lived was called “Takluban”, or “covered” as that was the last scream of the tragic Mulay. No one knows to this day where the creature of Kabatok has gone, it is believed that it still lives deep in the fathoms of the Bay ready to pounce on fishermen and fishing boats that go beyond forbidden territories to scrounge on its hidden treasures, navigated and known only to Kabatok.

[1] Morga, Antonio de, “Historias de las Islas Filipinas”

[2] Cuna, Rosa Ester T., The Spanish term for this type of livelihood in the olden times was “buscada”, or scroungers.

[3] Anacion, Dulce C. “whether it is tikog or bari-is (grass found in Leyte and Samar ) is purely speculative.”

painting above: "The Legend" by Dulz Cuna, 1992, Oil on canvas
(The Author: Prof. Dulce Cuna Anacion has a degree of Masters in Art History from UP Diliman. She teaches Humanities and the Communication Arts in UP Visayas Tacloban College. She is a Visual and Performance Artist, poet and a writer, singer and an esoteric art collector. She also is a practicing psychic and divinator (tarot cards). This is a family heirloom she wants to share in her site.)
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Old July 2nd, 2009, 11:57 AM   #228
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An Panitik Namon nga mga Waray
By Victor N. Sugbo

Eastern Visayas is composed of the islands of Samar, Leyte, Biliran and the smaller outlying islands. In terms of political divisions, it is made up of six provinces, namely Northern Samar, Eastern Samar, Samar, Biliran, Leyte, and Southern Leyte. As of Census 1995, the region’s total population stood at 3.5 million with Leyte having the highest population concentration at 1.5 million, and Biliran, the smallest population at 132 thousand.

The region is humid, and has no definite wet and dry seasons. It is generally agricultural and its main crops include coconut, banana, potatoes, cassava, abaca, and sugarcane. Its other source of income is fishing. Frequent occurrences of typhoons have perennially disturbed the economy of the region but people seem to have adapted well enough.

The City of Tacloban is the major center of trade and commerce and education in the region.

THE SOCIOLINGUISTIC SITUATION

The mountain ranges that traverse the islands of Samar, Leyte, and Biliran have influenced the development of dialectal varieties of Waray and distinct speech communities. In Leyte, the Central Cordillera that bisects the island has provided the condition for the establishment of two distinct speech communities, the Waray and the Cebuano, and the growth of dialectal varieties of Waray. In Biliran, a similar speech situation exists. The hilly and mountainous terrain of Samar has contributed to the rise of Waray dialects, and likewise has nurtured a small number of Cebuano speech communities.

The 1995 Census Report reveals that there were more than 2 M speakers of Waray and 1.2 M speakers of Cebuano in the region. About 80 per cent of the total population in the region were registered functionally literate – that is, being able to read, write, and count.

THE LITERATURE

The literature of Eastern Visayas refers to the literature written in Waray and Cebuano by writers from the region. Of the two, it is Waray literature that has been collected, recorded, and documented by scholars and researchers, a movement largely spurred by the interest of German priests, managing a university in Tacloban City, who saw the necessity of gathering and preserving the literary heritage of the region. It is in this light that whenever East Visayan literature is written about, it is usually Waray literature that is being described.

Earliest accounts of East Visayan literature date back to 1668 when a Spanish Jesuit by the name of Fr. Ignatio Francisco Alzina documented the poetic forms such as the candu, haya, ambahan, canogon, bical, balac, siday and awit. He also described the susumaton and posong, early forms of narratives. Theater tradition was very much in place – in the performance of poetry, rituals, and mimetic dances. Dances mimed the joys and activities of the ancient Waray.

With three centuries of Spanish colonization and another period of American occupation, old rituals, poetic forms and narratives had undergone reinvention. A case in point is the balac, a poetic love joust between a man and a woman. According to Cabardo, the balac retained its form even as it took new names and borrowed aspects of the languages of the colonizers. During the Spanish period, the balac was called the amoral; during the American occupation, it was renamed ismayling, a term derived from the English word “smile.” According to a literary investigator, in certain areas of Samar, the same balac form or ismayling has been reinvented to express anti-imperialist sentiments where the woman represents the motherland and the man, the patriot who professes his love of country.

Modern East Visayan literature, particularly Waray, revolves around poetry and drama produced between the 1900s and the present. The flourishing economy of the region and the appearance of local publications starting in 1901 with the publication of An Kaadlawon, the first Waray newspaper, saw the flourishing of poetry in Waray.

In Samar, Eco de Samar y Leyte, a long running magazine in the 1900s, published articles and literary works in Spanish, Waray and English. A noteworthy feature of this publication was its poetry section, An Tadtaran, which presented a series of satirical poems that attacked the changing values of the people at the time. Eco likewise published occasional and religious poems.

In Leyte, An Lantawan, which has extant copies from 1931 to 1932, printed religious and occasional poetry. It also published satirical poems of Bagong Katipunero, Luro, Datoy Anilod, Marpahol, Vatchoo (Vicente I. de Veyra), Julio Carter (Iluminado Lucente), Ben Tamaka (Eduardo Makabenta), and Kalantas (Casiano Trinchera). Under these pseudonyms, poets criticized corrupt government officials, made fun of people’s vices, and attacked local women for adopting modern ways of social behavior..

With the organization of the Sanghiran San Binisaya in 1909, writers as well as the illustrados in the community banded together for the purpose of cultivating the Waray language. Under the leadership of Norberto Romualdez Sr, Sanghiran’s members had literary luminaries that included Iluminado Lucente, Casiano Trinchera, Eduardo Makabenta, Francisco Alvarado, Juan Ricacho, Francisco Infectana, Espiridion Brillo, and statesman Jaime C. de Veyra. For a time, Sanghiran was responsible for the impetus it gave to new writing in the language.

The period 1900 to the late fifties witnessed the finest Waray poems of Casiano Trinchera, Iluminado Lucente, Eduardo Makabenta, and the emergence of the poetry of Agustin El O’Mora, Pablo Rebadulla, Tomas Gomez Jr., Filomeno Quimbo Singzon, Pedro Separa, Francisco Aurillo, and Eleuterio Ramoo. Trinchera, Lucente, and Makabenta were particularly at their best when they wrote satirical poetry.

The growing acceptance of English as official language in the country strengthened these writers’ loyalty to the ethnic mother tongue as their medium for their art. The publication of Leyte News and The Leader in the twenties, the first local papers in English, brought about the increasing legitimization of English as a medium of communication, the gradual displacement of Waray and eventual disappearance of its poetry from the pages of local publications.

Where local newspapers no longer served as vehicles for written poetry in Waray, the role was assumed by MBC’s DYVL and local radio stations in the seventies. Up to the present time, poetry sent to these stations are written mostly by local folk – farmers, housewives, lawyers, government clerks, teachers, and students. A common quality of their poetry is that they tend to be occasional, didactic, and traditional in form. The schooled writers in the region, unlike the local folk poets, do not write in Waray nor Filipino. Most of them write in English although lately there has been an romantic return to their ethnic mother tongue as the medium for their poetry.

Waray drama was once a fixture of town fiestas. Its writing and presentation were usually commissioned by the hermano mayor as part of festivities to entertain the constituents of the town. Town fiestas in a way sustained the work of the playwright. In recent years, this is no longer the case. If ever a play gets staged nowadays, it is essentially drawn from the pool of plays written earlier in the tradition of the hadi-hadi and the zarzuela.

According to Filipinas, an authority on the Waray zarzuela, the earliest zarzuela production involved that of Norberto Romualdez’ An Pagtabang ni San Miguel, which was staged in Tolosa, Leyte in 1899. The zarzuela as a dramatic form enthralled audiences for its musicality and dramatic action. Among the noteworthy playwrights of this genre were Norberto Romualdez Sr., Alfonso Cinco, Iluminado Lucente, Emilio Andrada Jr., Francisco Alvarado, Jesus Ignacio, Margarita Nonato, Pedro Acerden, Pedro Separa, Educardo Hilbano, Moning Fuentes, Virgilio Fuentes, and Agustin El O’Mora.

Of these playwrights, Iluminado Lucente stands out in terms of literary accomplishment. He wrote about thirty plays and most of these dealt with domestic conflicts and the changing mores of Waray society during his time. Although a number of his longer works tend to be melodramatic, it was his satirical plays that are memorable for their irony and humor, the tightness of their plot structure, and the specious use of language.

The hadi-hadi antedates the zarzuela in development. It used to be written and staged in many communities of Leyte as part of town fiesta festivities held in honor of a Patron Saint. It generally dealt with Christian and Muslim kingdoms at war. Today one hardly hears about hadi-hadi being staged even in the Cebuano speech communities of the region.

Fiction in Waray has not flourished because it lacks a venue for publication.

Cebuano literature produced in Eastern Visayas is still undocumented terrain. To the writers from the Cebuano speech communities in the region, Cebu City is their center. It is thus not surprising if much of the literature from these communities, particularly fiction and poetry, have found their way into Cebu City’s publications. Known Cebuano writers of Leyte like Eugenio Viacrusis, Angel Enemecio, Enemecio Fornarina, and Fernando Buyser first published their fiction and poetry in Cebu publications, and their works have afterward formed part of the literary anthologies in the Cebuano language.

Posted in www.ncca.gov.ph.
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Old July 2nd, 2009, 11:59 AM   #229
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Ha Akun Tunang Natawhan
ni Iluminado Lucente

An Iruy nga Tuna matam’is pagpuy-an,
Kay diin man siplat purus kasangkayan,
Hahani an hingpit nga ak’ kalipayan,
Hahani hira nanay pati kabugtuan.

Ugaring mahiblun
Ha dughan mabug-un,
Nga an Pilipinas dayuday uripun…
Ay, Tuna nga ak’ Natawuhan!
Hain dawla an langit
Han im’ Kaluwasan!

An Iruy nga Tuna kun nagmumusakit,
Kun nagiginbihag, nagigin-uripun,
Tungug hin kabidu hararaptay hapit,
An luha ug turaw nagkakatiripun.

Inin akun laylay,
Karawta nga halad,
Ubus nga pag-ugay hadin waray palad…
Ay, Tuna nga ak’ Natawuhan!
Hain dawla an langit
Hain im’ Kaluwasan!
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Old July 2nd, 2009, 12:00 PM   #230
Mars Uy
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Waray-Waray defended
By Rolando O. Borrinaga
Tacloban City
(Published in the Philippine Daily Inquirer, November 29, 2003.)

THE WARAY-WARAY, the people who speak the Bisayan language of Leyte and Samar, remains a scorned linguistic group at present. Thus, many native speakers of this language prefer to hide their ethnic identity outside the region by speaking another language, oftentimes Tagalog with either a heavy or queer accent.

The ethnic label was always “Waray-waray” (with stress on all syllables), to refer to both the people and the predominant language of Eastern Visayas. At least, the label stayed that way until the circa-1960s movie “Waray-waray” starring the late Nida Blanca, which became the benchmark spoof on the Leyte-Samar people and their culture.

The movie and its theme song, the title of which was grossly mispronounced by the Tagalog actors, made them the cultural scapegoats for the underside of the Filipino nature.
Somehow, in recent decades, half of the two same-word label got lost or was dropped, and the word “Waray” (with stress on the second syllable) was appropriated to substitute for the original label.

Of course, the literal meaning of the substitute half-label is “none” or “nothing,” which connotes a desperate state or condition of hopelessness.

The dropping of half the label seems to have been influenced by former First Lady Imelda Romualdez Marcos, who carped against the negative meaning of the single word and cursorily dismissed the syllabication of the original two-word label for her people and their language.

“May ada-ada“

In her heyday, Imelda in fact attempted to substitute her artificial label with “may ada-ada.” However, contrary to her wish, the “Waray-waray” tag stuck; “may ada-ada” was rejected as substitute label, and its meaning evolved to include persons who suffer from occasional loss of sanity.

So for now, “Waray-waray” or its shortened version “Waray” is largely perceived as an embarrassing label among the schooled segment of the Leyte-Samar population. Yet the persistence of this label somehow invites the suspicion that “Waray-waray” must have been an honorable identity and source of pride during ethnic times.

I tried to look into this line of thinking and found the following:

* In his monumental work, “The Jesuits in the Philippines,” Fr. Horacio de la Costa mentioned that the revered ruler of a part of Bohol at the Spanish contact was known as “Waray Tupung” (i.e., No Equal). This obviously Waray-waray chief probably ruled a territory that included the present towns of Bato in Leyte and Bien Unido in Bohol, whose municipal governments are still disputing over the ownership of an islet and a shoal that are sites of a multi-million seaweed farm in the Camotes Sea.

* In his English translation of some Chinese manuscripts on Filipino-Chinese contacts during the pre-Spanish era, the late Dr. William Henry Scott mentioned about occasional raids on coastal parts of Imperial China by warriors from the Bisayas (i.e., Leyte-Samar). These raiders might have come from Kandaya (literally, “belonging to Big Boat”). Daya (Big Boat) seemed to be the moniker of a great Waray-waray confederate chief who once ruled over most, if not the whole, of Samar and some parts of Leyte. The Tagalogs, who were probable preys of Daya, presumably trivialized his name later and memorialized the word to refer to a “cheat” or “shrewd manipulator.”

* Probably a Waray-waray native himself was Lapulapu, our earliest national hero. In a paper that Fr. Miguel A. Bernad, SJ, published in Kinaadman journal in 1995, I hypothesized that Lapulapu might have been the chief of Bagasumbol, an ancient village in the capital town of Naval, in Biliran Province. “Baga sombol,” the ethnic Waray for “like a symbol of a great victory or conquest,” seemed to have been the ascribed moniker of Lapulapu, memorializing his victory over Ferdinand Magellan in the Battle of Mactan on April 27, 1521.

Bagasumbol was probably Lapulapu’s “provincial” domain, while Mactan might have been his “urban” domain for trade and ethnic relations with Cebu, an international trade center during his time. Like some part of Bohol, Mactan might have been Waray-waray territory in those years.
From the above historical speculations, we can infer that the “Waray-waray” identity was associated with superior and admirable traits during ethnic times. “Waray-waray” seemed to indicate reckless valor and defiance, ambition, aggressiveness, and native heroics against white-skinned colonizers.

That we now believe the exactly opposite connotation of “Waray-waray,” and seek to dissociate ourselves from the shame, may be attributed to the debasing effects of our colonial miseducation, and to the dominating intrusion of “western” and “Imperial Manila” cultures into our way of thinking.

It is time for the Waray-waray people to again take pride in their identity, to exorcise themselves of the self-inflicted shame presently associated with their ethnic label, and to strive to accentuate the positive traits of their ancestors in the 21th century context.
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Old July 4th, 2009, 05:39 PM   #231
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mars Uy View Post
Ha Akun Tunang Natawhan
ni Iluminado Lucente

An Iruy nga Tuna matam’is pagpuy-an,
Kay diin man siplat purus kasangkayan,
Hahani an hingpit nga ak’ kalipayan,
Hahani hira nanay pati kabugtuan.

Ugaring mahiblun
Ha dughan mabug-un,
Nga an Pilipinas dayuday uripun…
Ay, Tuna nga ak’ Natawuhan!
Hain dawla an langit
Han im’ Kaluwasan!

An Iruy nga Tuna kun nagmumusakit,
Kun nagiginbihag, nagigin-uripun,
Tungug hin kabidu hararaptay hapit,
An luha ug turaw nagkakatiripun.

Inin akun laylay,
Karawta nga halad,
Ubus nga pag-ugay hadin waray palad…
Ay, Tuna nga ak’ Natawuhan!
Hain dawla an langit
Hain im’ Kaluwasan!
Ang lalim nito..
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Old July 16th, 2009, 04:43 PM   #232
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Lupang Hinirang
(Waray-Waray Version)
Tuna han higugma
Perlas han sidlanganan
An adlaw alpanan
Han iya katahum.

Minahal nga tuna
Puyot han kabantugan
Di lulupigan
Magpasipara ha im.

Ha imo langit kabukiran
Ngan ha dagat sugad man
Hayag han buhi kasidayan
Han katalwas nga minahal.

An matahom nga im bandera
Hin kapawa nga gayod
Ha pag-awayan panlimpasog
Nga diri magdudulom.

Tuna han lipay lamrag ngan gugma
Say kapuy-anan matam-is ungod.
Ngan halad namon an kinabuhi
Kun pasipad-an an imo dungog.
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Old July 16th, 2009, 04:46 PM   #233
carl_vilches21
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Wrote by whom?
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Old July 16th, 2009, 04:46 PM   #234
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An Waraynon

The Waray-speaking people of LEYTE and SAMAR have been stereotyped as a fierce people when provoked. In the province of Leyte, this reputation is especially accorded to natives of Jaro, an interior town located 39 kilometers northwest of Tacloban City. Even the Philippine Law Dictionary added legitimacy to this stereotype by including among its entries the phrase "good-bye Jaro." This refers to the sharp long-bladed bolo, the ubiquitous tool of the Leyteño (i.e., Jaro)
farmer, when used to stab or hack a person to death.

It may be noted that the "official insurrection" in Leyte collapsed after only 16 months of symbolic and so-so resistance with the surrender in May 1901 of Gen. Ambrocio Mojica, the Caviteño appointed by Pres. Aguinaldo as politico-military governor of the province. Col. Florentino Peñaranda, Capt. Jesus de Veyra, other leaders and a handful of their followers had surrendered by June 1902.

However, the surrender of the "official revolutionists" did not end the war in Leyte. Instead, the struggle assumed greater ferocity and force after it was picked up by the Pulahan (the freedom fighters in red uniforms), a pseudo-religious social movement with millenarian aspirations and mostly peasant membership. The so-called "Pulahan Wars" against the American regime in Leyte lasted five years from 1902 to 1907.

Among the Pulahan leaders in Leyte, official records acknowledged the leadership roles and importance of the brothers Juan Tamayo and Felipe Tamayo, who were labeled as bandits from Jaro, Leyte. Juan Tamayo seemed to have been the second-ranking leader of the Pulahan in Leyte after "Papa" Faustino Ablen, the Pulahan "pope" in the island. Felipe Tamayo served as "chief of staff" of Ablen.
http://leysam.ning.com/
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Old July 16th, 2009, 04:48 PM   #235
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carl_vilches21 View Post

Wrote by whom?
hi Julian Felipe? Pinagtulungan ng ibang Waray-Waray artists na matranslate sa Waray-Waray ang Lupang Hinirang.
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Old July 16th, 2009, 04:52 PM   #236
carl_vilches21
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..Galing talga..Halos di ko maintindihan ang ibang mga linya...Meron ding English viersion niyan..
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Old July 16th, 2009, 04:54 PM   #237
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Yes. Yung 'Chosen Land'.
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Old July 24th, 2009, 10:47 PM   #238
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uy, mamingaw man didi. paghimo gad kamo hin siday nga waray agud magmarisyo inin.
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puhon.. puhon..
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Old July 25th, 2009, 01:25 AM   #239
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Kay pagbutang gad kita hin Siday.

Mga Siday ni Vicente S. de Veyra
An Hustis

Ha harayo nga pulong, bisan marampag
ha dughan
An pagmakasasala mo ha bagting
Han ak' simod, ako la gihapon an
Mapainubsanon, ako, ako an madarahug
Nga 'say naangay makigbisog ha lawod
Han kaarawdan, kay ikaw an naghalad,
Ikaw an kinmarawat han ak' kamaisog
Nga malunod an ngatanan nga paghusga,
o gugma.

Ha halipot nga pulong, bisan buong,
bisan.



*Bisan buong, bisan alludes to the local Samar-Leyte call of the roaming magbobote (buyer of used bottles).




The Prostitute


In the long way of saying it, although
it's flowery on the chest
Your sinning upon the tolling of
My snout, I am yet the
Humble one, I, I am the oppressor
Who deserves to fight at the depths of
Shame, for you were the one who gave
offerings,
You were the one who received my valor
That all judgments drown, o love.

In the short way of saying it, though
broken, even so.





-- translated by the poet and Ophelia Miralles from the original Samar-Leyte (Waray language)
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Old August 2nd, 2009, 02:43 PM   #240
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DARAGA NGA WARAY-WARAY
by DANNY BASAS
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