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Old June 17th, 2012, 10:38 PM   #681
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1st vessel from Jebel Ali to reach Kochi today


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Old June 18th, 2012, 12:38 PM   #682
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Ship service from Jebel Ali starts today
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A weekly direct container ship service, operated by Evergreen Shipping connecting Jebel Ali to Kochi, will commence its service on Monday.

‘Sea Bright’, the first vessel of this service will reach the Vallarpadam International Container Transshipment Terminal at 10 am on Monday. The vessel will be sailing in the Kochi-Colombo-Jebel Ali-Kochi route.

The ship from Jebel Ali will reach Kochi in five days while the return trip to Jebel Ali will take seven days.“This regular service will reduce the transit time from Kochi to Jebel Ali by two to three days and from Jebel Ali to Kochi by four days,” the port authorities said.

The service will cater to raw cashew imports for which the season has just commenced. It will also be helpful to the exporters who send cargo via Inland Container Depots in central parts of India, as they can send containers direct to Jebel Ali without unloading at Colombo, the port authorities said.
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Old June 18th, 2012, 07:10 PM   #683
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passionfruit12 View Post
The International Container Transshipment Terminal at Vallarpadam is struggling to register a positive growth with regard to the volume of containers handled.

As per figures available with the Cochin Port Trust, the parent organisation, the volume of containerised cargo handled at ICTT has fallen by 10 per cent, during the first 45 days of the current financial year in comparison to the same period last fiscal.

In the first 14 days of this month, the situation was even more pathetic with the growth rate going down by 20 per cent.

The terminal had registered a negative growth of 5 per cent in the first ten days of January 2012, compared to the same period in the financial year 2010-11.

Developed and operated by the Dubai Port World, the Rs 3,200-crore Transshipment Terminal was expected to alter the development map of Kerala and to give Kochi, a prominent place in the global maritime map. It was commissioned in February 2011.

The ICTT, which has a capacity to handle 1 million TEUs annually, has never touched this figure after it became operational.

According to the Cochin Port Trust authorities, stiff provisions in Maritime Act is adding to the woes of the terminal.

“Though the Planning Commission recommended the Union Government to provide relaxation in the Cabotage provision, it is yet to be realised.

What we could understand is that shipping lines are waiting to get the provisions relaxed”, the Port authorities said.

Meanwhile, an office bearer of an organisation in the shipping industry, who does not want to be named, said that, no transshipment was being done in Kochi.

“Various issues in Kochi have prompted shipping lines to complete transshipment process at Colombo or some other ports.

Even though the cargo was destined to Indian ports, they do not prefer to do transshipment in Kochi,” he said.

From Express
http://newindianexpress.com/cities/k...icle543813.ece
This IGTPL website mentions 2500 ground slots at ICTT. This translates to about 410,000 TEU Terminal capacity as per TAMP formula and not 1 Million TEU as projected often.
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Old June 18th, 2012, 10:11 PM   #684
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New weekly direct shipping service linking Kochi, Jebel Ali launched
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Giant cargo ship: ‘Sea Bright’ at Vallarpadam .

A weekly direct shipping service connecting Jebel Ali to Kochi has started with the launch of South India Gulf Express (SGE) service from Indian Subcontinent to West Asia.

The first vessel — m.v. Sea Bright — of this service has called at Vallarpadam on Monday and has unloaded 124 import containers and loaded 310 export containers.

The service run by Evergreen Shipping Line and Simatech is the latest service to West Asia from South India. The service has a port rotation of Kochi-Colombo-Jebel Ali-Kochi with a transit time of 8 days to and from Jebel Ali and is a weekly service calling Kochi every Monday.

Mr K.K. Krishnadas, Chief Executive Officer, DP World – Kochi, said that the new service is in addition to the two other mainline services calling ICTT Vallarpadam to Europe and China and has the fastest transit time to Jebel Ali from South India. With this service, he said, ICTT has eight direct calls to Jebel Ali every month. The service will be beneficial to shippers from Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka hinterlands. At ICTT, the company strive continuously to bring more such services for the benefit of the trade, he added. Meanwhile, sources here pointed out that the services would cater to raw cashew imports.
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Old June 19th, 2012, 01:25 AM   #685
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Old June 20th, 2012, 03:45 AM   #686
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From manorama
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Old June 20th, 2012, 06:41 AM   #687
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Not encouraging, even though every port in the country is facing the heat. High time authorities wake up to the realities and do the needful.
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Old June 22nd, 2012, 03:22 AM   #688
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Coimbatore, Tirupur trade want rail connectivity from ICD Irugur resumed

Kochi, June 21:

To woo customers from Coimbatore and Tirupur, the container terminal operator DP World Kochi organised trade meetings in these two regions.

Sources in the shipping fraternity who participated in the meet said that the trade in Coimbatore had suggested re-starting of the rail connectivity from ICD Irugur, which would offer cheaper and faster cargo service.

Exporters from Pollachi demanded the opening up of the Gopalapuram Check Post which would save them transportation cost while shipping through Kochi Port.

Due to present restrictions of container movement through Gopalapuram check post, the exporters are forced to route their goods via the Walayar Check Post incurring additional running distance.

Representatives from the trade pointed that they prefer to ship via Chennai and Tuticorin due to cost advantage.

However, they were of the opinion that Kochi Port would also be a cost-effective solution if containers meant for exports are routed via Gopalapuram check post.

Garment exporters from Tirupur cited higher transportation cost and terminal handling charges at ICTT Vallarpadam as the reason for opting Tuticorin Port as their major gateway.

The starting of direct Europe and China service from ICTT has been attracting them due to transit time and cost saving.

However, they expressed the view that Kochi would be a preferred gateway if more mainline services to major destinations in Europe and US starts from Vallarpadam.

The Facilitation centre at Walayar jointly run by DP World and the Kerala Chamber of Commerce and Industry also won a lot of accolades from the trade.

The centre had handled more than 700 containers in May. Apart from e-filing, the centre supports the trade with facilities like coordination with the commercial taxes office, communication facilities.

Shipping lines operating mainline services at Kochi projected the advantages of using their service during the session. Various CFS and ICD operators highlighted their infrastructure facilities and services to the Exim trade.

Speaking on the occasion, Mr K.K. Krishnadas, Chief Executive Officer, DP World Kochi, said that the company will do everything possible to ensure even last minute connections to avoid containers getting shut out.

Mr Elvis D’Cruz, General Manager Commercial, DP World and Mr Jimmy George, Deputy Traffic Manager, Cochin Port Trust also attended the function.

The event was well attended by the EXIM fraternity comprising exporters, importers, shipping lines, CFS and ICD operators, Freight Forwarders and Custom House Agents.

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/...cle3555471.ece
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Old June 22nd, 2012, 01:47 PM   #689
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Cabotage law to be relieved; Foreign cargo ships to be allowed on local routes
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Relaxation will be for a limited period of three years and only for containers going through Vallarpadam



Bangalore: India is set to ease a key law by permitting foreign registered container ships to carry cargo between the country’s ports, as long as it is shipped out or in through the international container trans-shipment terminal or ICTT at Vallarpadam in Cochin port, marking a significant change in the current policy.

India’s coastal trade (shipping cargo between different local ports) is reserved for ships registered in India and foreign ships can be hired only when Indian ships are not available, according to the so-called cabotage law.

A foreign shipping line currently cannot carry a container either to or from the Vallarpadam ICTT to any other port in the country, hampering its operations following the February 2011 start.

A panel of secretaries headed by cabinet secretary Ajit Kumar Seth discussed the proposal on Wednesday. The likely policy change comes with a rider. The relaxation will be only for export/import containers or transshipment containers going through Vallarpadam. And it will be for a limited period of three years till the country’s coastal shipping sector becomes competitive with the introduction of tax breaks, enabling local fleet owners to expand capacity to meet demand, at least three people who attended the Wednesday meeting said, speaking on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to discuss the deliberations publicly.

The proposals need to be signed off by the Union cabinet, they added. Union shipping secretary Pradeep Sinha, one of the participants, declined to give details of the decision, saying that the meeting was “confidential”.

DP World Pvt. Ltd, the world’s fourth biggest container port operator majority owned by the Dubai government, won the 30-year contract to build and operate the ICTT in a public auction in 2004. The first phase of the terminal, built at an investment of Rs. 3,000 crore, can load one million standard containers a year. A spokesperson for DP World declined to comment.

The ICTT loaded 337,053 standard containers in the year to March 2012 against 312,191 standard containers a year earlier.

“Huge money has been invested in setting up the Vallarpadam facility, but the cabotage policy was acting as a constraint in realizing its full potential,” said a secretary to one of the government ministries and one of the three people mentioned above.

“So, you could either let the infrastructure created with huge investments remain idle or take some action to see that it is utilized to the fullest extent possible,” this person said, adding that “a relaxation of law is to be tried out for a limited period to see how it impacts the ICTT and how the security concerns are addressed.”

The Indian National Shipowners Association, or Insa, a local shipping industry lobby, continues to oppose any relaxation in the cabotage law.

“The cabotage law is strictly enforced in many countries. It will not only affect the local fleet owners when foreign lines ply domestic routes, but there are security concerns also,” an Insa spokesperson said.

Local firms that run port facilities have also opposed easing the cabotage law just for the Vallaprapadm facility, fearing that their ports will be reduced to the status of feeder (smaller) ports once this happens.

“If the cabotage is relaxed, it should be relaxed for all the ports and not just for Vallarpadam,” said a director at Adani Ports and Special Economic Zone Ltd, which runs container facilities at Mundra port.

Vallarpadam was designed to cut India’s dependence on neighbouring hub ports such as Colombo in Sri Lanka, Singapore, Salalah and Jebel Ali in Dubai, Tanjung Pelepas and Port Klang in Malaysia to send and receive container cargo, thus saving time and cost for exporters and importers. India’s exporters and importers incur extra costs in excess of Rs. 1,000 crore a year on transshipment of containers through other ports, according to the shipping ministry.

India’s exporters and importers pay an additional Rs. 600 crore every year to ship their containers via Colombo alone, the ministry said.

A container transshipment terminal such as the one developed at Vallarpadam acts like a hub, into which smaller feeder vessels bring cargo which then gets loaded onto larger ships. Larger vessels bring about economies of scale, and lower the cost of operations for shipping lines, which then translates into lower freight rates.

The cabotage restriction was a major deterrent to India’s ports operating as hub ports, said Jonathan Beard, executive director and global practice leader (ports, airports, logistics and transport services) at London-based consulting firm ICF GHK Holdings Ltd, and the managing director of its Hong Kong office.

“Indian legislation does not permit feeder services between Indian ports on foreign flag vessels,” he said. “If India wants a hub port to be a reality then it should be allowed to compete with Colombo, Singapore, etc, which provide the shipping line freedom to determine the networks,” said S.S. Kulkarni, secretary general of the Indian Private Ports and Terminals Association (IPPTA), a port industry lobby.

“The ICTT can develop as a transshipment terminal for the subcontinent only if foreign flag vessels are permitted to carry export/import trans-shipment containers from any of the Indian ports to the ICTT or vice-versa,” said a spokesperson for the Container Shipping Lines Association, or CSLA, a body representing foreign container firms operating in India.

“If the cabotage law is interpreted to treat trans-shipment containers as domestic cargo, it will be a huge disincentive to shipping lines that operate both mainline vessels and feeder vessels. While the same shipping line can carry their trans-shipment containers from Colombo to any port in India, they don’t have the freedom to operate to other Indian ports from Vallarpadam. This has discouraged large shipping lines from moving their operations from Colombo to Cochin,” a spokesman for the union government-controlled Cochin port said.
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Old June 22nd, 2012, 11:10 PM   #690
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‘Great growth potential for logistic sector in Kerala’
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Logistics sector has a lot of growth potential in Kerala. However, due to various reasons, no serious efforts are being made to tap this potential.

Now, the government and the private sector are coming together to identify the problems that are hindering the logistic sector growth.

As a part of this initiative, a two-day international conference on ‘New trends in Logistics’ is being organised jointly by the State government, Kerala State Productivity Council and private sector players.

Falcon Infrastructures Ltd, operators of the first private sector container freight station in Kerala, is one of the parties associated with the new initiative. Mr N.A. Mohammed Kutty, Managing Director, Falcon Infrastructure, spoke to Business Line on the potential of the sector in the State and its problems. Experts:

What are the emerging opportunities in logistics sector in Kerala?

With the commissioning of Vallarpadam Terminal, Kerala has tremendous opportunities in logistics industry especially by establishing free trade warehousing zones (FTWZs).

FTWZs enable the importers to store stocks for a longer period of up to two years without paying any duty and can re-export after some value addition.

Considering the geographical advantage and the proximity to international maritime routes, Kerala can certainly emerge as the right logistics hub of the southern states.

The ICD's of Hyderabad, Bangalore and Coimbatore can have a better connectivity and become more economical, when Vallarpadam Terminal becomes fully operational.

The distance from Chennai to Bangalore and Hyderabad is almost the same and additional expenditure on transhipment through Colombo can be saved, if transhipment takes place from Vallarpadam.

What do you expect the state Government to do?

The State Government can do a lot for the development of this sector.

The development of the available basic infrastructure facilities should be the main focus.

While the other service sectors such as tourism, health care, education, IT and ITES, shipping etc. have specific ministries and departments, the logistics sector is left uncared for, despite its critical importance to the growth of other sectors and the overall economy.

The Government should consider the possibility of forming a dedicated ministry for logistics to drive grwoth in the sector.

Why logistics industry had not taken off as expected even after the commissioning of Vallarpadam Terminal?

Vallarpadam is considered as a transhipment terminal with SEZ status and an alternate facility to Colombo and Singapore for transhipments.

The existing Cabotage Law is a major hurdle to the projected development of Vallarpadam, as foreign vessels cannot operate containers within the Indian ports. The long delay at Valayar check post for clearance of the export cargo especially garments from Thirupur is another cause for which the State Government should provide a fast track clearance facility with a separate counter for export cargo.

As a pioneer in the logistics industry in Kerala, what has been your experience ?

Pioneers always suffer a lot to thrive and establish, especially when you choose to implement projects with innovative and unique ideas. For them there are also no case studies to refer.

What are your new projects?

Falcon's Integrated Logistics Hub near Kochi was the first of its kind in the country and still the only one that offers fully integrated logistics services including CFS.

Now, our aim is to set up the first FTWZ at Kochi. We are in the process of acquiring land near Cochin International Airport for the purpose.
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Old June 22nd, 2012, 11:51 PM   #691
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Naval ship repair yard gets new machine shop
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KOCHI: A machine shop was inaugurated on Friday at the Naval Ship Repair Yard (NSRY), Kochi as part of its modernization drive to cater to advanced platforms and expansion of the Indian Navy.

At present, NRSY undertakes maintenance and repair of warships and other craft of Southern Naval Command and visiting ships.

It was inaugurated by 82-year-old P K Ponnappan Pillai who retired as the first principal foreman of the yard in 1991. Vice Admiral Satish Soni, flag officer commanding in chief, Southern Naval Command was present.
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Old June 25th, 2012, 03:31 AM   #692
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http://malayalam.deepikaglobal.com/N...newscode=98696
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Old June 25th, 2012, 02:33 PM   #693
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Xiamen opens shipping route to Indian ports of Nhava Sheva and Cochin
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Dongdu port, in Xiamen, Fujian province, opened another international container transport and shipping route, on May 26, from its Haitian Terminal, in a further display of its near-sea shipping advantages.

This new line is the fastest route from Xiamen to the Indian ports of Nhava Sheva and Cochin, and, thanks to the shipping times and frequency, is more competitive.

This shipping line improves the layout of Xiamen port and increases trade connections with South Asia, while providing greater support for the effort to turn Xiamen into an international shipping center for southeastern China.
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Old June 25th, 2012, 09:19 PM   #694
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Cochin Shipyard to get order for India's second Aircraft carrier
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India plans to build its second indigenous aircraft carrier after the first one becomes operational by 2015 -16.

The first one – 40,000 tonnes Indigenous Aircraft Carrier 1 (IAC-1), christened INS Vikrant, is being constructed at Cochin Shipyard Limited (CSL) since 2009 and is expected to be inducted by 2017.

Subsequently, CSL will undertake construction of the second carrier, which will be bigger than the first one. The larger IAC that will weigh about 65,000 tonnes is likely to be called INS Vishal.

“The indigenous aircraft carrier programme is planned to be a continuing process over the next decade as Indian Navy aims to have at least two fully operational and combat worthy carriers available at any given time,” Navy Chief Admiral Nirmal Verma said in his talk at the International Institute of Strategic Studies in London on Monday.

With India’s lone carrier INS Viraat at the fag end of its career, Navy is set to receive Russian-origin INS Vikramaditya in December to boost its capability.

The IAC-1 will be launched in water by 2013 and may start sea-trials by 2016. The programme is almost two and half years behind schedule as the target launch date was 2010. As the Navy’s long-term perspective plan envisages having three carrier battle groups, the CSL will start building IAC-2 once the work on the first one is over. A must to have in the repository to be projected as a powerful maritime nation, a carrier battle group is a small flotilla of warships at the core of which lie an aircraft carrier.

Verma said Navy’s induction programme was structured in such a way that every year over the next 5 years, as many as five ships and submarines would be inducted if shipyards deliver the platforms on contract schedule.
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Old June 27th, 2012, 03:31 AM   #695
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Clarification issued on cargo clearance at ICTT

More than a month after the Department of Revenue, Union Ministry of Finance, issued a memo laying down procedures to clear transhipment containers at Vallarpadam International Container Transshipment Terminal (ICTT), the Shipping Ministry has clarified that Special Economic Zone procedures would apply to sea-routed transhipment cargo at the ICTT.

The Additional Commissioner of Central Excise, Customs and Service Tax here is learnt to have conveyed this message to industry stake-holders here in a letter issued last week.

The letter was issued following a meeting in New Delhi in which the Union Shipping Secretary clarified on the decisions taken earlier on clearing transshipment containers at the Vallarpadam terminal.

The meeting held in New Delhi on June 21 was clear that transshipment at Vallarpadam terminal, located within a special economic zone, would be handled under the SEZ procedures for sea-routed foreign to foreign and foreign to domestic cargo.

This means that containers originating in a foreign country and headed for another foreign country (moving through sea) via the ICTT will be cleared by Customs at the Special Economic Zone.

Containers originating in India and going to a foreign country (sea-to-sea) will also be cleared by SEZ Customs. Similarly, containers originating in a foreign country and headed for a destination in India, moving via the sea, will also be cleared by SEZ Customs.

However, containers originating in India moving either on road or rail into ICTT will be cleared by the Department of Revenue, Customs. Containers moving out of ICTT via road or rail will also be cleared by the Department of Revenue, Customs.

The latest clarification is expected to help resume transshipment business at the ICTT, at a standstill since late January this year.

Since the Department of Customs has been insisting on checking each of the containers for security reasons, transshipment business has been down at the terminal.

Difficulties related to clearance of transshipment containers originated with the seizure of red sanders from the terminal premises in October last year.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/...cle3572555.ece
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Old June 29th, 2012, 05:33 AM   #696
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SEZ norms will apply to sea-routed transhipment cargo at Vallarpadam

The Union Government has clarified that special economic zone procedures will apply to sea routed transhipment cargo at ICTT Vallarpadam.

The Additional Commissioner of Central Excise, Customs and Service Tax are reported to have conveyed this message to industry stake-holders here in a letter last week.

According to sources, the letter was issued following a meeting in New Delhi between officials in the Finance and Shipping ministries, which further clarified on the decisions taken earlier on clearing transhipment containers at Vallarpadam.

It may be recalled that the Department of Revenue had issued a memo laying down certain procedures to clear transhipment containers at ICTT based on a decision taken at the meeting convened by the PMO.

However, the recent meeting held in New Delhi on June 21 was clear that transhipment at Vallarpadam terminal, located within a special economic zone, would be handled under the SEZ procedures for sea routed foreign to foreign and foreign to India and India to foreign.

This means that containers originating in a foreign country and headed for another foreign country (moving through sea) via ICTT will be cleared by Customs at the Special Economic Zone.

Containers originating in India and going to a foreign country (sea-to-sea) will also be cleared by SEZ Customs. Similarly, containers originating in a foreign country and headed for a destination in India, moving via the sea, will also be cleared by SEZ Customs.

However, containers originating in India moving either on road or rail into ICTT will be cleared by the Department of Revenue, Customs.

Containers moving out of ICTT via road or rail will also be cleared by the Department of Revenue, Customs.

The sources said that the latest clarification is expected to help resume transhipment business at the ICTT, which is at a standstill since January this year.

It is pointed out that the Department of Customs had been insisting on checking each of the transhipment containers for security reasons, which resulted in decline in transhipment business.

According to sources, there was no such time taking procedures at other international transhipment terminals.

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/...cle3581387.ece
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Old July 2nd, 2012, 06:02 PM   #697
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DP World Ports Vallarpadam Container Terminal: The numbers behind point towards another huge scam

By some indications, this is a scam of larger proportions than the Commonwealth Games fiasco. Take a huge unnecessary project, inflate the costs, get your cronies to cover the inflated expenses by bringing in a private player like DP World in this case, and when the project obviously fails, cry wolf, and then get out

We had earlier reported (See: (See: Cochin Port Trust bats for DP World, LBW cabotage ) on how a one-sided contract between Cochin Port Trust and DP World Ports Vallarpadam Container Terminal, its tenant, had sparked off intense lobbying over cabotage rules. Now we dig a little deeper.

Nothing works better towards getting the truth than digging out the dirt by actually going onsite and sifting through the sediment as well as getting a first-hand grip on matters.

So when my reports on the whole Cochin Port Trust, DP World Ports Vallarpadam Terminal and ICTT (International Container Trans-shipment Terminal) at Kochi started doing the rounds (see link above) and were being quoted—amongst other places, at the Ministry of Shipping and elsewhere, I felt it was time to actually go down to Ground Zero and take a look.

Obviously, it is not easy to get an entry into such high-security areas, but then, where there is a will, there is a way, and the report was too important to be abandoned half-way just because the follow-up needed some solid hard work.

This was not really planned, it was supposed to just be a short detour in life to go back on a ship for a few months, but as things turned out, of all things, I found myself working on a ship, dredging the bottom of the sea right off the Vallarpadam Terminal in Kochi, at times just metres away from the jetty. And more importantly, working with people who knew every inside secret of what was really happening there, and the real games involved. But we get ahead of the report.

Go to Kerala today and talk to most anybody even remotely connected with shipping, and many of them will make it sound as though the removal of cabotage is the ultimate and only way to ensure the development of Kerala, every other logical argument or reason is put aside. And towards that, the reasoning trotted out is that the DP World's Vallarpadam Container Terminal's sheer survival is directly connected to Kerala's industrial development, and that in turn will not happen without cabotage being withdrawn. An issue of national importance and security is to be forsaken because, it is argued by those who push this in Kerala for their UAE-based masters, the commercial and technical importance of Vallarpadam is just too brilliant for the Nation.

That is the major flaw, but like the emperor who wore no clothes, nobody will tell the Chief Minister and his cohorts this. There are those, of course, who know the realities and are now beginning to come out. Speaking to some of them involved the usual "off-the-record" aspect, so, in this article, we present some simple facts, without attributing sources, but which can be easily re-verified.

a) The Vallarpadam Container Terminal even at its best-projected levels will simply not be feasible for 4th Generation and upwards container ships. Third generation container ships are midgets compared to the 6th Generation mainline container ships swinging past through Colombo on their East-West runs. These ships will not be able to enter the Cochin Harbour channel itself, leave alone the Port and the Vallarpadam terminal. A good explanation of the various generations of container ships is given here: http://people.hofstra.edu/geotrans/e...inerships.html and you can see that even today, Panamax-sized 3rd Generation ships can hardly call Cochin Port. Still, to give the devil his due, to start with even a 3rd Generation container ship of the 3,000-4,000 TEU (twenty-foot equivalent unit) capacity level at Kochi is very welcome.

To break even, Vallarpadam will need to do between 3 million and 5 million TEUs per annum. As of now, it is doing about 0.3 million through 0.4 million TEUs. Where is this massive jump going to come from? Will shippers from the north suddenly lose interest in Gujarat ports and Mumbai/JNPT to come all the way to Kerala? Will those from the eastern parts abandon Chennai or Tuticorin (or Thoothukudi, as it is called now)? Here's a reality check—which ports are more customer-friendly, and have better rail linkages? The answers are there, clear to see.

b) The Vallarpadam Container Terminal is not going to be commercially feasible as a mainline container port for multiple reasons. For one, the hinterland is seeing development for a variety of reasons—none of which are really industrial—Kerala's economy is growing more due to tourism, remittances and some agriculture than any heavy industries. Sure, there is consumption, but one-way inbound traffic cannot sustain a mainline port—it has to be two-way.

And there is simply not much outward traffic. The terminal, even now, appears to be full of empty containers awaiting repositioning back to the north and west of India, or abroad.

c) Another myth is that Cochin Port is just 10 miles off the main sea-lanes. This would be true for coastal traffic or for ships hugging the Indian coast for whatever reason—mobile phone signal, piracy avoidance, or specifically heading for Indian ports or the Persian Gulf. But a fast container ship with high freeboards and guards on board would use what is called the 8-degree Channel, or other options, well south of Kochi by about 80 miles or even more if it were headed for Colombo, Singapore or Malaysia, to run what is called the "pendulum" between the Red Sea on one side and the Malacca Straits via Colombo on the other.

d) This is not substantiated because like in all things pertaining to shipping, the real numbers never seem to be emanate, but Colombo Port is supposed to be about 2.5 times as efficient in terms of speed of container handling and one-quarter of the price in terms of cost to shipping line, when compared to Cochin Port and its tariff structure.

In any case, the relationship between the corporate entities that operate Colombo Port and Cochin Port are deep to say the least, and they can easily play one off against the other if required. However, as of now, Colombo has dozens of cranes and over six deepwater jetties, while Cochin has only four cranes and two jetties-of which one jetty, the eastern one, is surrounded by extremely shallow water where the port appears to have now realised that the bottom is rock & shale, which will have to be cut out and then dredged. At a very high cost.

e) There has been constant dredging of silt going on for years in Kochi harbour now, and a short stint onboard one of these dredgers reveals that it would be a joke, if it were not for the fact that it is the taxpayer who is paying for this joke. Literally, these dredgers are in the hands of bandicoots and bedbugs, who simply transport some silt and more water from the port to the dumping ground about 10 miles outside, but probably in the interest of prolonging their engagement, are playing some really stupid games which consist of the same silt, sediment and water going in and out of the port. A bit too technical to explain—but you can imagine the process is akin to taking water from Cochin Port, dumping it into the Arabian Sea, and then coming back for more.

f) The side-effect of these silt- and water-movement games is what is known as the 'littoral' effect. This is impacting the beaches, and especially the strips near, for example, Fort Cochin and the famous fishing nets. These areas are being effected, as well as the beaches in and beyond the gut which leads to Vypeen (one of the islands that form part of the city of Kochi), and Fort Cochin. There is every chance that after the beaches, which have already been eroded, the next to go will be the beachfront properties themselves. Either that, or look for huge expense in building retaining walls, rising waters due to climate change adding to the complications.

g) Kochi Refineries Limited (KRL) realised this years ago, its report on this exists and was ignored by the powers-that-be when greedily swallowing the bait for Vallarpadam of heavy capital expense and all that went with it, and so it decided to move out of Cochin Port. Since it made for almost 90% of the revenue and movement, it was persuaded to stay back, and at a huge cost—a new tanker & gas terminal which could easily have been an offshore SBM (Single Buoy Mooring) anywhere along the coast, with deepwater, is coming up along the northern shore outside Kochi harbour. Needless to say, more dredging and port works, as well as deepening of the channel is going to be in order here too—when there were ample less environmentally-sensitive spots all along the Kerala coast which could have been made into deepwater ports for tankers and gas carriers, at much lower cost and disruption.

For some people I spoke to, the whole DP Ports/Vallarpadam Terminal is a scam of larger proportions than, for example, the CWG scam. Take a huge unnecessary project, inflate the costs, get your cronies to cover the inflated expenses by bringing in a private player like DP World in this case, and when the project obviously fails, cry wolf, and then get out.

Whether it is really a huge scam or not, time only will tell, but as of now, the taxpayer has largely paid the bill for a port terminal going nowhere.

The bets are out in Kochi, the money is on DP World likely abandoning the Vallarpadam project and leaving the Government of India with a huge bill paid for a terminal that is going nowhere, and continuous high-cost maintenance dredging at great environmental cost a side-effect. The whole noise about cabotage is just humbug dreamt up to divert real attention.





source: http://moneylife.in/article/dp-world...cam/20131.html
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Old July 2nd, 2012, 06:05 PM   #698
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Kochi port invites bids to set up port-user complex
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The Kochi port’s plans to optimise the use of land available on Willingdon Island seem to have taken a step forward.

The port management has now invited bids for setting up a port user complex on 0.90 hectares to be leased out for a 30-year period. The land is being leased out on an upfront premium basis for setting up the proposed complex, close to the Ernakulam wharf.

According to port officials, the new land use plan was drawn up after the management found that land on the Willingdon Island was not being used optimally and to augment income. The new plan was drawn up so as to divide the land available into areas for core and non-core activities. The new land use plan, when implemented, will give the Willingdon Island a facelift as port activities are now scattered all over the Island. The objective of the port is to bring all port-related activities within a single complex. Earlier, the port authority had decided not to renew lease agreements with its customers that ended in 2011 with a view to embarking on its new land use policy, which was drawn up in keeping with the guidelines of the Union Shipping Ministry. The new policy will free large cargo area on the northern side of the Island.

The plans include setting up a business district towards the south end of the Island that will cater to the new requirements of the port operations.

The port trust has a total of 385 hectares available to it on the Island, including the 233 hectares of reclaimed land.

The port management has plans to set up a tea trade centre on the model of the Dubai Tea Trade Centre in collaboration with Cochin Tea Trade Association; a ship repair complex augmenting the current facilities and a free trade zone on more than 105 acres of land available towards the south of the Willingdon Island. Among the other plans included improving cargo handling facilities and developing the Ernakulam wharf into a dedicated bulk cargo handling facility.
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Old July 2nd, 2012, 06:06 PM   #699
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Some people are constantly interested in bashing ICTT.... Otherwise, whats the point in posting a very old news report, that came on net and discussed here umpteen number of times.....

Hope they get some satisfaction by posting this... Perhaps, that itself is a big gift, as none of us, can individually give even a bit of satisfaction/pleasure....
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Old July 4th, 2012, 04:13 AM   #700
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from metro vartha
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