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Old August 23rd, 2006, 11:58 AM   #1081
Animo
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A bridge to the past in Quezon province


ART Deco chairs in the Marquez mansion.

By Bea Zobel Jr.
Inquirer News Service

IT was one of our longest trips ever. Eleven in the evening, and we were just limping home. It was truly tiring -- but it was worth it.

My friend Ino had invited me on a trip around the mountain towns of Quezon. This was in preparation for an exhibit at the Met.

Our first stop was Tayabas, cradled in the bosom of Banahaw, the sacred mountain. We were warmly welcomed by then mayor Dondi Silang. He fed us a delicious breakfast.

Among the sumptuous tidbits that I briefly noted before devouring was a bread called bonete. It was warm and yielding, tasting of things fried and sinful. It was wonderful with hot scrambled eggs and tomatoes.

Happily fortified, we were off to explore the town. Actually Dondi's place, Mi Casa en Tayabas, is a destination in itself. The restaurant is quite pretty and cozy. There is an inn with rooms designed by Dondi himself. Such a versatile young man: a dentist, an actor, and even an inn-keeper!

In the garden is an incredible display of stone implements from grinders for grain to bins and troughs. There are also these crosses carved from rock which, I was told were used for an elaborate ritual.

Next stop was the Casa de Comunidad. This is like a town hall in the 19th century, recently restored. When we were there, there was an exhibit made by the young people of the town," World Heritage in Young Hands," organized by the Met.

In a subsequent trip (yes, I went back!) I had a chance to see another Met exhibit, the traveling show "Letras y Figuras." This included a dynamic workshop where the kids painted right on the sidewalks. I remember thinking then that this was the kind of activity that would probably get us jailed by Bayani Fernando!

To return to our circuit, another stop was Tayabas Church. I am told this temple is one of the grandest that the Franciscans ever built in the Philippines.

Among its features is a magnificent silver altar frontal (naku, believe me, it takes time to get all these terms right). What is so amazing about it is, if one looks carefully, one can make out among the beaten metal leaves and flowers cleverly concealed human faces!

I am told church scholar Ricky Jose has noted a similar design in Vigan. We also saw this face-in-the-ferns pattern in the silver pieces in Baclayon, Bohol.

Translator

Given my ancestry, it was no surprise I was asked to translate the Spanish inscription on an elaborate wooden bench near the altar. As you can imagine, the carving recorded for posterity the name of the pious donor.

Perhaps what is Tayabas' most impressive landmark is its fantastic five-span bridge, the Malagonlong. This was built way back in 1841. It is heartbreakingly beautiful with its graceful arches and finely shaped contours. Right at the center of the span is an inscription celebrating the builders.

Interestingly, Ryan Palad (who really adores this piece of our heritage) showed us that, by looking up at the underside of the bridge, one espies, etched with letters -- stonemasons' marks. What a fascinating glimpse of the past -- even as the town's elite were setting up inscriptions glorifying their names, the humble masons who did most of the real work were finding ways to quietly leave something of themselves behind.

Unfortunately, the view of this exquisite bridge has been somewhat ruined by a new one built right beside it. Lunch was at the office of a local NGO, Kabanahaw. Our host was local historian Jun Redor. We were treated to a fantastic feast, mostly prepared by Jun.

On the menu were pako salad freshly picked from the forest; pinais, which is coconut with kamamba leaves and fresh water shrimps; as well as laing. In case there were still empty spaces in our stomachs, dessert was a formidable cassava pudding called budin by the locals.

After lunch, it was time to head for Sariaya. We paused briefly to see the seal of the Franciscans (two arms intertwined before a cross) carved on a wall.

Sariaya is famous for its beautiful houses. Dominating everything is the fabulous Marquez mansion designed by Andres Luna de San Pedro. Inside the house is one of the most stunning sets of Art Deco furniture that I have ever seen.

Another beautiful home is the Rodriguez house, which is now a restaurant called Nuon at Ngayon. The owners very graciously allowed us to explore the interiors. There is a lovely mural of a garden scene on one wall. But what is truly breathtaking were the ceilings.

Every room has painted decor overhead that has a different fruit as motif. My favorite is the rambutans! Imagine the creativity and sophistication that went into the decorative elements of these home environments.

Spanish might

Our day ended with dinner at Villa Escudero. There, we reviewed what we saw that day. We all agreed that the highlights were the Tayabas bridge and the Sariaya ceilings.

Ino decided to take advantage of our inability to protest because of exhaustion, to deliver one last lecture. He pointed out that Tayabas was actually the only capital from the Spanish colonial period to be built in the mountains. The Spanish invested a lot in this town -- several bridges, a huge church, a town hall, plus three chapels. Why?
Perhaps it was because they had to emphasize Spanish might in contrast to that great power center of Philippine culture -- Mt. Banahaw.

For centuries Mt. Banahaw was a sanctuary of Filipinos. Its slopes sheltered rebels, robbers, refugees, outcasts and mystics. It still plays this role today.

It was truly an inspiring lecture, but I am afraid that we all probably fell asleep while listening.

Recalling that fulfilling day, there is one sad note. On my subsequent trip to Tayabas, I was horrified to see a really ugly blue pipe that had been brutally cemented into the fragile structure of Malagonlong Bridge. What a travesty! Why couldn't we have more respect for this lovely, delicate monument? Why do we continue to wreck our heritage? I hope someone has done something to restore the bridge's integrity.

Every time we deface an old bridge, every time we wreck an ancestral house or tear down the beams of an ancient church, we destroy pieces of ourselves. We smash what are actually little windows into the hearts of our ancestors. We shatter the little messages they have so lovingly left us: marks on stones, fruits delicately painted on ceilings, faces among silver ferns.

When will this destruction stop?

E-mail comments to beartist@filipinaslibrary.org.ph or write to Filipinas Heritage Library, Makati Ave., Ayala Triangle, Makati City.
http://supplements.inq7.net/wowfest/...ear&art=20.htm
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Old August 23rd, 2006, 11:58 AM   #1082
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A bridge to the past in Quezon province


ART Deco chairs in the Marquez mansion.

By Bea Zobel Jr.
Inquirer News Service

IT was one of our longest trips ever. Eleven in the evening, and we were just limping home. It was truly tiring -- but it was worth it.

My friend Ino had invited me on a trip around the mountain towns of Quezon. This was in preparation for an exhibit at the Met.

Our first stop was Tayabas, cradled in the bosom of Banahaw, the sacred mountain. We were warmly welcomed by then mayor Dondi Silang. He fed us a delicious breakfast.

Among the sumptuous tidbits that I briefly noted before devouring was a bread called bonete. It was warm and yielding, tasting of things fried and sinful. It was wonderful with hot scrambled eggs and tomatoes.

Happily fortified, we were off to explore the town. Actually Dondi's place, Mi Casa en Tayabas, is a destination in itself. The restaurant is quite pretty and cozy. There is an inn with rooms designed by Dondi himself. Such a versatile young man: a dentist, an actor, and even an inn-keeper!

In the garden is an incredible display of stone implements from grinders for grain to bins and troughs. There are also these crosses carved from rock which, I was told were used for an elaborate ritual.

Next stop was the Casa de Comunidad. This is like a town hall in the 19th century, recently restored. When we were there, there was an exhibit made by the young people of the town," World Heritage in Young Hands," organized by the Met.

In a subsequent trip (yes, I went back!) I had a chance to see another Met exhibit, the traveling show "Letras y Figuras." This included a dynamic workshop where the kids painted right on the sidewalks. I remember thinking then that this was the kind of activity that would probably get us jailed by Bayani Fernando!

To return to our circuit, another stop was Tayabas Church. I am told this temple is one of the grandest that the Franciscans ever built in the Philippines.

Among its features is a magnificent silver altar frontal (naku, believe me, it takes time to get all these terms right). What is so amazing about it is, if one looks carefully, one can make out among the beaten metal leaves and flowers cleverly concealed human faces!

I am told church scholar Ricky Jose has noted a similar design in Vigan. We also saw this face-in-the-ferns pattern in the silver pieces in Baclayon, Bohol.

Translator

Given my ancestry, it was no surprise I was asked to translate the Spanish inscription on an elaborate wooden bench near the altar. As you can imagine, the carving recorded for posterity the name of the pious donor.

Perhaps what is Tayabas' most impressive landmark is its fantastic five-span bridge, the Malagonlong. This was built way back in 1841. It is heartbreakingly beautiful with its graceful arches and finely shaped contours. Right at the center of the span is an inscription celebrating the builders.

Interestingly, Ryan Palad (who really adores this piece of our heritage) showed us that, by looking up at the underside of the bridge, one espies, etched with letters -- stonemasons' marks. What a fascinating glimpse of the past -- even as the town's elite were setting up inscriptions glorifying their names, the humble masons who did most of the real work were finding ways to quietly leave something of themselves behind.

Unfortunately, the view of this exquisite bridge has been somewhat ruined by a new one built right beside it. Lunch was at the office of a local NGO, Kabanahaw. Our host was local historian Jun Redor. We were treated to a fantastic feast, mostly prepared by Jun.

On the menu were pako salad freshly picked from the forest; pinais, which is coconut with kamamba leaves and fresh water shrimps; as well as laing. In case there were still empty spaces in our stomachs, dessert was a formidable cassava pudding called budin by the locals.

After lunch, it was time to head for Sariaya. We paused briefly to see the seal of the Franciscans (two arms intertwined before a cross) carved on a wall.

Sariaya is famous for its beautiful houses. Dominating everything is the fabulous Marquez mansion designed by Andres Luna de San Pedro. Inside the house is one of the most stunning sets of Art Deco furniture that I have ever seen.

Another beautiful home is the Rodriguez house, which is now a restaurant called Nuon at Ngayon. The owners very graciously allowed us to explore the interiors. There is a lovely mural of a garden scene on one wall. But what is truly breathtaking were the ceilings.

Every room has painted decor overhead that has a different fruit as motif. My favorite is the rambutans! Imagine the creativity and sophistication that went into the decorative elements of these home environments.

Spanish might

Our day ended with dinner at Villa Escudero. There, we reviewed what we saw that day. We all agreed that the highlights were the Tayabas bridge and the Sariaya ceilings.

Ino decided to take advantage of our inability to protest because of exhaustion, to deliver one last lecture. He pointed out that Tayabas was actually the only capital from the Spanish colonial period to be built in the mountains. The Spanish invested a lot in this town -- several bridges, a huge church, a town hall, plus three chapels. Why?
Perhaps it was because they had to emphasize Spanish might in contrast to that great power center of Philippine culture -- Mt. Banahaw.

For centuries Mt. Banahaw was a sanctuary of Filipinos. Its slopes sheltered rebels, robbers, refugees, outcasts and mystics. It still plays this role today.

It was truly an inspiring lecture, but I am afraid that we all probably fell asleep while listening.

Recalling that fulfilling day, there is one sad note. On my subsequent trip to Tayabas, I was horrified to see a really ugly blue pipe that had been brutally cemented into the fragile structure of Malagonlong Bridge. What a travesty! Why couldn't we have more respect for this lovely, delicate monument? Why do we continue to wreck our heritage? I hope someone has done something to restore the bridge's integrity.

Every time we deface an old bridge, every time we wreck an ancestral house or tear down the beams of an ancient church, we destroy pieces of ourselves. We smash what are actually little windows into the hearts of our ancestors. We shatter the little messages they have so lovingly left us: marks on stones, fruits delicately painted on ceilings, faces among silver ferns.

When will this destruction stop?

E-mail comments to beartist@filipinaslibrary.org.ph or write to Filipinas Heritage Library, Makati Ave., Ayala Triangle, Makati City.
http://supplements.inq7.net/wowfest/...ear&art=20.htm

Last edited by Animo; August 23rd, 2006 at 12:10 PM.
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Old August 23rd, 2006, 12:11 PM   #1083
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'Dream' search on for missing Ozamiz relic

By Ryan Rosauro
Inquirer News Service

OZAMIZ CITY, Misamis Occidental--A renewed search for a centuries-old image of the Blessed Virgin, which was stolen some three decades ago, was recently launched by officials of Ozamiz City as part of efforts to restore a relic of the city's Iberian heritage.

The stolen item is a five-foot wooden statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary that had been the object of veneration of the local Catholic faithful for over two centuries.

According to an account of Jesuit priest-historian Miguel Bernad, the statue resembles "the Virgin of the Apocalypse with flowing robes, a crown of 12 stars, and angels and clouds, and a serpent and the moon under her feet."

18th-century fort

Resty Acapulco, a former newsman who now chairs the city mayor's Council of Advisers, said the image was stolen from the local church sometime in 1974. A person named Bernad, who was visiting his family in the city, discovered the loss and called the attention of the parish priest, he recalled.

The missing statue resembles another image hung on the postern gate of an 18th-century Spanish fort in the city known as the Birhen sa Cotta. During the Spanish period, the wooden statue was placed in a wooden chapel inside the fort for veneration by Spanish soldiers. It was transferred to the town church in the mid-1940s when the Americans took over the fort, which was used as a Japanese garrison during the Second World War.

Acapulco, who covered the story about the image's loss and the search, said the statue came all the way from Bilbao, Spain. It was the only image of the Blessed Virgin in the world that is listed in the Vatican archives as the Nuestra Senora del Triunfo dela Cruz (Lady of the Triumph of the Cross), he said.

Before the relic was stolen, a scapular embedded with two emerald stones that adorned the Blessed Virgin was lost, added Acapulco, "as if portending a greater tragedy." The scapular belonged to the Spanish-descended Bernad family; it is worn on the image every time it was marched in a procession during the Blessed Virgin's feast on July 16.

Acapulco related that an Irish diviner with whom a Columban missionary priest had consulted, said the statue had been dumped into the sea.

Mystery

While calling the renewed search "a dream," Acapulco insisted on really finding the image, "no matter what."

Throughout the years, the loss had been rather mysterious for the townsfolk until the present campaign was launched. Mystery, however, continues to shroud the efforts.

Asked what the leads pursued by authorities during that time were, Acapulco simply replied: "There are truths that are better left unsaid."

In a resolution passed unanimously, the city council urged the National Historical Institute and the National Bureau of Investigation to aid the local government in the search.

Councilor Irene Luansing Jr., who authored the resolution, said the local government wanted to find the image, which was once part of the Spanish fort, as the garrison would be marking its 250th year by 2006. The fort was constructed in 1756.

Councilor Simplicia Neri, chair of the tourism committee, said the restoration of the relic was important for the city's push to develop as a historical and cultural destination.

Most likely, the ancient relic is now in the possession of antique collectors, said Luansing.

A replica of the image was created upon commission of the local Catholic church and is encased in concrete and glass at a small foreground park in front of the cathedral.

In an article several years ago, Bernad said he had sought the help of then Philippine Constabulary chief Fidel Ramos, but nothing had come out of it.

"We might also have to involve the foreign affairs department as the stolen image might have been sold abroad," said Luansing.

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Old August 23rd, 2006, 12:11 PM   #1084
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'Dream' search on for missing Ozamiz relic

By Ryan Rosauro
Inquirer News Service

OZAMIZ CITY, Misamis Occidental--A renewed search for a centuries-old image of the Blessed Virgin, which was stolen some three decades ago, was recently launched by officials of Ozamiz City as part of efforts to restore a relic of the city's Iberian heritage.

The stolen item is a five-foot wooden statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary that had been the object of veneration of the local Catholic faithful for over two centuries.

According to an account of Jesuit priest-historian Miguel Bernad, the statue resembles "the Virgin of the Apocalypse with flowing robes, a crown of 12 stars, and angels and clouds, and a serpent and the moon under her feet."

18th-century fort

Resty Acapulco, a former newsman who now chairs the city mayor's Council of Advisers, said the image was stolen from the local church sometime in 1974. A person named Bernad, who was visiting his family in the city, discovered the loss and called the attention of the parish priest, he recalled.

The missing statue resembles another image hung on the postern gate of an 18th-century Spanish fort in the city known as the Birhen sa Cotta. During the Spanish period, the wooden statue was placed in a wooden chapel inside the fort for veneration by Spanish soldiers. It was transferred to the town church in the mid-1940s when the Americans took over the fort, which was used as a Japanese garrison during the Second World War.

Acapulco, who covered the story about the image's loss and the search, said the statue came all the way from Bilbao, Spain. It was the only image of the Blessed Virgin in the world that is listed in the Vatican archives as the Nuestra Senora del Triunfo dela Cruz (Lady of the Triumph of the Cross), he said.

Before the relic was stolen, a scapular embedded with two emerald stones that adorned the Blessed Virgin was lost, added Acapulco, "as if portending a greater tragedy." The scapular belonged to the Spanish-descended Bernad family; it is worn on the image every time it was marched in a procession during the Blessed Virgin's feast on July 16.

Acapulco related that an Irish diviner with whom a Columban missionary priest had consulted, said the statue had been dumped into the sea.

Mystery

While calling the renewed search "a dream," Acapulco insisted on really finding the image, "no matter what."

Throughout the years, the loss had been rather mysterious for the townsfolk until the present campaign was launched. Mystery, however, continues to shroud the efforts.

Asked what the leads pursued by authorities during that time were, Acapulco simply replied: "There are truths that are better left unsaid."

In a resolution passed unanimously, the city council urged the National Historical Institute and the National Bureau of Investigation to aid the local government in the search.

Councilor Irene Luansing Jr., who authored the resolution, said the local government wanted to find the image, which was once part of the Spanish fort, as the garrison would be marking its 250th year by 2006. The fort was constructed in 1756.

Councilor Simplicia Neri, chair of the tourism committee, said the restoration of the relic was important for the city's push to develop as a historical and cultural destination.

Most likely, the ancient relic is now in the possession of antique collectors, said Luansing.

A replica of the image was created upon commission of the local Catholic church and is encased in concrete and glass at a small foreground park in front of the cathedral.

In an article several years ago, Bernad said he had sought the help of then Philippine Constabulary chief Fidel Ramos, but nothing had come out of it.

"We might also have to involve the foreign affairs department as the stolen image might have been sold abroad," said Luansing.

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Old August 23rd, 2006, 02:23 PM   #1085
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Old August 23rd, 2006, 02:23 PM   #1086
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Old August 29th, 2006, 03:02 AM   #1087
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Spanish heritage complex in the heart of Manila

By Augusto Villalon
Inquirer
Last updated 01:10am (Mla time) 08/28/2006

Published on page C2 of the August 28, 2006 issue of the Philippine
Daily Inquirer

WHO SAID CONSTRUCTING A NEW building beside an old one is not good
design? Many people believe that the new building must "conform" to
the old one by attempting to look alike or at least somewhat similar.

Philippine architects today still follow the outdated "conforming
architecture" concept, pairing old and new, designing new buildings
that mimic the old by grafting a detail or a feature that echoes a
bit of the old building in the new one.

Many times the borrowed heritage detail is force-fit into the new
structure, resulting in an uneasy, out-of-place architecture that
awkwardly attempts a blending of old and new.

The truth is that the new always pales in comparison with the old.
The original is always better. Imitation is seldom better than the
original. So why imitate? Why put the old ill at ease with the new?

In planning its new headquarters on San Luís Street in Manila,
Instituto Cervantes decided not to imitate the historic Casino
Español de Manila beside it. Instead what it built was a new, totally
modern building that relates wonderfully to its heritage neighbor.

The two buildings are totally at ease with each other.

Respected

Among the oldest private clubs in the country, the Casino Español is
a respected Manila institution. The club premises, designed in 1951
by architect Jose Ma. Zaragoza, are done in the fluid "Filipino-
California-Spanish style," a hybrid architectural style popular
during the post-World War II years.

The venerable building, a low single-story structure whose arched
loggias spread around a shaded interior courtyard, is one of the last
surviving Manila structures from that forgotten era.

The membership should be commended for retaining the original
structure of their club and for resisting "modernization."

Now comes the new Instituto Cervantes. Erected on Casino Español
property, the new building located on the far side of the existing
club quadrangle is architecture unmistakably of the 21st century, a
structure in total contrast with the Zaragoza building on the other
side of the shared quadrangle.

Contrasting with the arches of the Casino's loggia, the Instituto
presents a two-story all-glass wall looking out to the quadrangle
from behind a covered open walk connecting classrooms on the ground
floor and exposing the library above. Although no details in the new
building mimic the old Zaragoza structure beside it, there is full
architectural respect between the two structures.

Interiors

The interiors of both buildings mirror the eras when they were built.
Beneath the low ceilings of the Casino everything is well-burnished
wood, polished red tile floors, and insets of azulejo tiles shipped
from Spain.

Javier Galván, architect and former director of the Instituto
Cervantes, takes the traditional Philippine bahay-na-bato as his
organizing principle for his conceptual design of the new structure.

The lobby evokes the traditional zaguan from a Spanish colonial house
in the Philippines. Ground-floor walls are rendered in raw concrete,
reminiscent of the stone walls of old. A grand staircase rises to the
upper floor, where wood makes an appearance on the floors and walls,
much like traditional Philippine houses. Evoking capiz windows in old
houses, wooden grids frame the glass on doors and windows.

Finishes are definitely 21st century. So is the allocation of space
and the handling of natural light.

On the ground floor, gray ceramic floor tiles link walls rendered in
raw concrete bathed in natural light from rooftop skylights that
continue into the second-floor library, whose floor stops short of
the perimeter wall to allow more natural light to filter into the
enclosed classrooms below.

Light

Light pierces all areas of the building, achieving luminosity and
transparency as well as the air circulation so central to tropical
architecture. The building captures Philippine lifestyle and
satisfies local climatic conditions perfectly.

Galván, who has devoted years studying Philippine architecture,
successfully updates historic and traditional references into 21st
century architecture, an approach common in other countries but
rarely seen in the Philippines.

History and tradition coexist on San Luís Street where both buildings
stand in neighborly harmony. The low, horizontal lines of both
façades form a harmonious dialogue along the street with the two-
story Instituto building accentuating rather than dwarfing the low
older building next to it.

Most important, one does not dominate the other. Each building,
confident of its excellence, does not try to outshine the other.
There is unity of vision on the street.

Think of a May-December architectural arrangement in this fusion of
old and new where each partner enters the relationship with strong
perspectives rooted in different generations. In the relationship,
one is not forced to "conform" to the other nor do the different
perspectives clash.

Despite an apparent disparity in form and style, the two partners
build a lasting bond that allows each one to maintain his
individuality as a shared identity is jointly built up.

May-December harmony is the lesson to be learned from Instituto
Cervantes and the Casino Español who show Manila how to be good
neighbors.

Now, does it still hold that you cannot marry a new building with an
older one?

Heritage watch

The new Citibank Savings branch shines on Quintin Paredes Street. Its
sensitive, straightforward reuse of an old Binondo building converted
into a contemporary banking area signals the start of a heritage
trend in a highly commercial inner-city neighborhood that usually has
little regard for its rich pedigree. Bravo!

E-mail the author at pride.place@gmail.com
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Old August 29th, 2006, 03:02 AM   #1088
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Spanish heritage complex in the heart of Manila

By Augusto Villalon
Inquirer
Last updated 01:10am (Mla time) 08/28/2006

Published on page C2 of the August 28, 2006 issue of the Philippine
Daily Inquirer

WHO SAID CONSTRUCTING A NEW building beside an old one is not good
design? Many people believe that the new building must "conform" to
the old one by attempting to look alike or at least somewhat similar.

Philippine architects today still follow the outdated "conforming
architecture" concept, pairing old and new, designing new buildings
that mimic the old by grafting a detail or a feature that echoes a
bit of the old building in the new one.

Many times the borrowed heritage detail is force-fit into the new
structure, resulting in an uneasy, out-of-place architecture that
awkwardly attempts a blending of old and new.

The truth is that the new always pales in comparison with the old.
The original is always better. Imitation is seldom better than the
original. So why imitate? Why put the old ill at ease with the new?

In planning its new headquarters on San Luís Street in Manila,
Instituto Cervantes decided not to imitate the historic Casino
Español de Manila beside it. Instead what it built was a new, totally
modern building that relates wonderfully to its heritage neighbor.

The two buildings are totally at ease with each other.

Respected

Among the oldest private clubs in the country, the Casino Español is
a respected Manila institution. The club premises, designed in 1951
by architect Jose Ma. Zaragoza, are done in the fluid "Filipino-
California-Spanish style," a hybrid architectural style popular
during the post-World War II years.

The venerable building, a low single-story structure whose arched
loggias spread around a shaded interior courtyard, is one of the last
surviving Manila structures from that forgotten era.

The membership should be commended for retaining the original
structure of their club and for resisting "modernization."

Now comes the new Instituto Cervantes. Erected on Casino Español
property, the new building located on the far side of the existing
club quadrangle is architecture unmistakably of the 21st century, a
structure in total contrast with the Zaragoza building on the other
side of the shared quadrangle.

Contrasting with the arches of the Casino's loggia, the Instituto
presents a two-story all-glass wall looking out to the quadrangle
from behind a covered open walk connecting classrooms on the ground
floor and exposing the library above. Although no details in the new
building mimic the old Zaragoza structure beside it, there is full
architectural respect between the two structures.

Interiors

The interiors of both buildings mirror the eras when they were built.
Beneath the low ceilings of the Casino everything is well-burnished
wood, polished red tile floors, and insets of azulejo tiles shipped
from Spain.

Javier Galván, architect and former director of the Instituto
Cervantes, takes the traditional Philippine bahay-na-bato as his
organizing principle for his conceptual design of the new structure.

The lobby evokes the traditional zaguan from a Spanish colonial house
in the Philippines. Ground-floor walls are rendered in raw concrete,
reminiscent of the stone walls of old. A grand staircase rises to the
upper floor, where wood makes an appearance on the floors and walls,
much like traditional Philippine houses. Evoking capiz windows in old
houses, wooden grids frame the glass on doors and windows.

Finishes are definitely 21st century. So is the allocation of space
and the handling of natural light.

On the ground floor, gray ceramic floor tiles link walls rendered in
raw concrete bathed in natural light from rooftop skylights that
continue into the second-floor library, whose floor stops short of
the perimeter wall to allow more natural light to filter into the
enclosed classrooms below.

Light

Light pierces all areas of the building, achieving luminosity and
transparency as well as the air circulation so central to tropical
architecture. The building captures Philippine lifestyle and
satisfies local climatic conditions perfectly.

Galván, who has devoted years studying Philippine architecture,
successfully updates historic and traditional references into 21st
century architecture, an approach common in other countries but
rarely seen in the Philippines.

History and tradition coexist on San Luís Street where both buildings
stand in neighborly harmony. The low, horizontal lines of both
façades form a harmonious dialogue along the street with the two-
story Instituto building accentuating rather than dwarfing the low
older building next to it.

Most important, one does not dominate the other. Each building,
confident of its excellence, does not try to outshine the other.
There is unity of vision on the street.

Think of a May-December architectural arrangement in this fusion of
old and new where each partner enters the relationship with strong
perspectives rooted in different generations. In the relationship,
one is not forced to "conform" to the other nor do the different
perspectives clash.

Despite an apparent disparity in form and style, the two partners
build a lasting bond that allows each one to maintain his
individuality as a shared identity is jointly built up.

May-December harmony is the lesson to be learned from Instituto
Cervantes and the Casino Español who show Manila how to be good
neighbors.

Now, does it still hold that you cannot marry a new building with an
older one?

Heritage watch

The new Citibank Savings branch shines on Quintin Paredes Street. Its
sensitive, straightforward reuse of an old Binondo building converted
into a contemporary banking area signals the start of a heritage
trend in a highly commercial inner-city neighborhood that usually has
little regard for its rich pedigree. Bravo!

E-mail the author at pride.place@gmail.com
http://showbizandstyle.inq7.net/life...ticle_id=17542
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Old August 30th, 2006, 05:53 AM   #1089
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Journey to Philippine Architecture [view website for photos]

By FELICISIMO TEJUCO, JR.

Last July 20, participants of the Heritage Conservation symposium at the UST College of Architecture learned more about the state of Philippine architecture and history. They also had a chance to hear four decades worth of architectural experience from Arch. Maria Cristina Turalba, FUAP. A renowned heritage lover, environmental planner and academician, Turalba recently released her book, “Philippine Heritage Architecture before 1521 to the 1970s.”


Through a powerpoint presentation, the speaker even took the audience to an audio-visual tour of the archipelago: from Batanes, the home of the Ivatans and where the spirit of bayanihan (cooperation) remains alive; to the hometown of Carcar, Cebu, known to be the patron of St. Catherine of Alexandria, the makers of ampaw (sweetened rice crispy) and home of the refurbished Carcar District Hospital; and Jolo, land of the Badjaos and Islam. In Manila, she led them to the Orchid Garden Suite Hotel, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas Building, and the CCP Complex.

Turalba’s talk started off with history of Philippine architecture, which is divided into four periods: the vernacular period, which dates until 1521, the arrival of the Spaniards. The Spanish era is followed by the short-lived American period. When World War II erupted, architecture did not only cease but a great number of them were reduced to dust like in the walled city of Intramuros. History revealed that Manila was only second to Warsaw, Poland as the most devastated city in the world.

Unfortunately, the destruction of architectural treasures continues to his day. Most dilapidated public buildings are at the mercies of the local government. In Manila, a number of heritage sites have been flattened like the Jai Alai Building. To date, the Avenue Theater, on the western side of Rizal Avenue near the corner of Claro M. Recto Avenue will be converted into a parking lot. This architectural work was designed by National Artist Juan Nakpil, known for the UP Administration Building and Library, Manila Jockey Club, and Philippine Village Hotel. During the open forum, Jeremy Badong of Adamson University noted that Luneta Hotel may soon follow a similar fate.

Crusade groups like the National Center for the Culture and the Arts and Heritage Conservation Society have waged a long and difficult campaign in the name of cultural preservation. Unfortunately, it’s not usually a happy ending. For one, Turalba disclosed that the Constitution is usually the threat against heritage structures when human life is on the line. "You cannot create a law that prohibits people from touching a building because that will be contrary to the constitution," she added.

Financing is another perennial problem which heritage groups cannot provide. "We can only provide technical assistance," Turalba said. Some ancestral houses like the Pastor House are lucky to have the financial support of its owners.

REUSE AND RESTORATION

Turalba stressed that adaptive reuse is a feasible alternative to heritage restoration. "Adaptive reuse is something that we have been doing. That’s why the ukay-ukay is flourishing. We turn things around. We convert old things to something news" she said.

The construction of new buildings should not mean the destruction of heritage treasures. Turalba cited the residence of Justice Antonio Villareal, built during the height of Art Deco in Vito Cruz St., Manila. It was refurbished to become the administration office of the Orchid Garden Suite. "It’s (the solution) good. When foreigners come in, they’ll see `ganito pala ang mga bahay natin noon.’"

Another example is the Carcar Dispensary in Cebu, which was originally built by Mayor Mariano Mercado sometime in the 1920s.

Even Luneta Hotel, the only structure reminiscent of French architecture in the country, can be restored to its full glory. Turalba suggested treating it with double windows to filter noise pollution. Upon restoration, the hotel can even put added premium to its services.

Turalba stressed that good design and architectural solutions will ensure higher chances of survival for the building. "If it was properly planned based on ordinances, maintenance cost will be low. That’s the basic rule," she added.

APPRECIATION

FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE


Because the country is in the middle of the international trading pool, cross cultural interaction and influences are inevitable from music to clothing to architecture. Turalba added that "architecture is about culture. Culture is about use of space and different people use it differently. Our own culture asserts itself."

In addition, architecture is a noble and creative profession. In designing, Turalba said "you can discipline people or you can destroy the Filipino people though your architecture. It is being sensitive to the need of the person, to the nature of the person."

She cited the inherent Filipino warmness and hospitality. Part of our culture is to welcome and escort family and relatives to the airport, which should be considered in the design of airport terminals. "A foreigner may not appreciate this but this is our culture. This is us. Isn’t it heartwarming to have all these people waiting to bring you home?"

She also noted the simplicity and effective design of the bahay kubo, which were "crafted by ordinary human beings based on principles of simple logic or common sense. It answered a lot of environmental needs and social needs. The bahay kubo responds to the environment."

During the humid months, the bamboo walls allow the breeze to come in. During the stormy months, residents open the windows so the wind doesn’t topple down the house. "It does not fight the earth but it is a building that dances with the earthquakes. This is `sustainable architecture,’" she added.

Similarly, the bahay na bato of the Spanish period was designed in response to natural calamities. Stone and mortar were only used on the lower floors while wood was extensively used on the upper floors. To soften up the design, walls were accented by wooden doors and window openings were made of capiz to let the light in. Doors for bedrooms are rarely closed. The only attempt at are privacy are the beautiful crochets that curtains the doorway. Turalba observed that Filipinos are generally apathetic and indifferent to old architecture. "When we talk of old houses, you would usually hear criticisms like `pangit kasi hindi modern.’ The move is always towards the modern," she said.

Turalba stressed the importance of heritage which are "physical reminders of our nation. Dito tayo nanggaling. Dito tayo nagmula. Destroying them (heritage structures) means wiping out the Filipinos," she said.

Turalba also noted the dedication to heritage conservation of our Asian neighbors like Japan. Since wood is quite difficult to maintain in buildings, some Japanese temples are being restored by dismantling the entire structure, removing old pieces and putting them back again. A 24-hour brigade also constantly monitors these religious monuments. In Russia, she shared a conversation she had with a taxi driver who said that the government’s priorities in the preservation of their palaces "are nothing compared to my needs."

PRESERVATION, PROMOTION

AND PROFESSIONALISM


Turalba encouraged everyone to do their share in promoting awareness on conservation heritage, especially to the owners of old buildings. "Architects can also have ulterior motives (in conservation heritage because) mas malaki ang professional fee. But you are our allies and not our enemies in heritage conservation. There is a way for you to have your cake and eat it to," she said.

She added: "Our forefathers have left us their ingenuity, of understanding how to build we nature. This is something that we should do, not destroy this earth. As architects, that is your responsibility, your contribution, your pamana to the rest of the Filipino people."

To future architects, Turalba stressed the importance of education and natural curiosity, encouraging them to visit and observe in job sites. She added that female architects are not exempted from working in the construction site. "Don’t you think that (building construction) is one of the most exciting things? From a bare ground, you see a building standing up?" she said.

She added that there are gems hidden even in the most unlikely places. "How many of you have taken the opportunity to go to a housing resettlement?I saw the most beautiful mosaic floor in a squatters residence. Inside the house, the floor was tiled by bottle caps laid out in a very neat pattern."

To her colleagues, aside from continuing education and professionalism, "In the planning of architecture, we do not work on concepts that can be changed overnight. What we have built will be here forever. That is why we have a very big responsibility to our country, to this world."

"As architects, you will be building structures and cities that are here to stay on this earth. When you make a mistake, it will be staring at you to be seen by the world. If you built something beautiful it will be your monument."

The talk was the first of a series of symposium held by the United Architects of the Philippines (UAP) Rizal-Kalayaan 100 Chapter. Sponsored by Crown Asia Compounders, the symposium was held in cooperation with UAP Student Auxiliary-UST (UAPSA-UST) Chapter.

Participants were UAPSA-Adamson University Chapter members, who are also graduating students, led by its chapter president, Jasper Domingo. Other attendees include students of the UST College of Architecture, UST Central Seminary, UST Graduate School, and professionals.

The next series of symposia is set on September 2006 at the Central Colleges of the Philippines. Speakers are architects Dianne Marcelle K. Abistado, UAP, senior architect at St. Luke’s Medical Center, (Heathcare Design and Maintenance), and Jenner P. Macaballug, UAP, (Computer Rendering Tips and Techniques). For inquiries or sponsorship, contact Arch. Boyet Tejuco (0915-403-5707 or 731-5355).

(The author is the president of the UAP Rizal-Kalayaan chapter, the organizer of the symposium.)

http://www.mb.com.ph/archive_pages.p...083072956.html
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Old August 30th, 2006, 05:53 AM   #1090
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Journey to Philippine Architecture [view website for photos]

By FELICISIMO TEJUCO, JR.

Last July 20, participants of the Heritage Conservation symposium at the UST College of Architecture learned more about the state of Philippine architecture and history. They also had a chance to hear four decades worth of architectural experience from Arch. Maria Cristina Turalba, FUAP. A renowned heritage lover, environmental planner and academician, Turalba recently released her book, “Philippine Heritage Architecture before 1521 to the 1970s.”


Through a powerpoint presentation, the speaker even took the audience to an audio-visual tour of the archipelago: from Batanes, the home of the Ivatans and where the spirit of bayanihan (cooperation) remains alive; to the hometown of Carcar, Cebu, known to be the patron of St. Catherine of Alexandria, the makers of ampaw (sweetened rice crispy) and home of the refurbished Carcar District Hospital; and Jolo, land of the Badjaos and Islam. In Manila, she led them to the Orchid Garden Suite Hotel, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas Building, and the CCP Complex.

Turalba’s talk started off with history of Philippine architecture, which is divided into four periods: the vernacular period, which dates until 1521, the arrival of the Spaniards. The Spanish era is followed by the short-lived American period. When World War II erupted, architecture did not only cease but a great number of them were reduced to dust like in the walled city of Intramuros. History revealed that Manila was only second to Warsaw, Poland as the most devastated city in the world.

Unfortunately, the destruction of architectural treasures continues to his day. Most dilapidated public buildings are at the mercies of the local government. In Manila, a number of heritage sites have been flattened like the Jai Alai Building. To date, the Avenue Theater, on the western side of Rizal Avenue near the corner of Claro M. Recto Avenue will be converted into a parking lot. This architectural work was designed by National Artist Juan Nakpil, known for the UP Administration Building and Library, Manila Jockey Club, and Philippine Village Hotel. During the open forum, Jeremy Badong of Adamson University noted that Luneta Hotel may soon follow a similar fate.

Crusade groups like the National Center for the Culture and the Arts and Heritage Conservation Society have waged a long and difficult campaign in the name of cultural preservation. Unfortunately, it’s not usually a happy ending. For one, Turalba disclosed that the Constitution is usually the threat against heritage structures when human life is on the line. "You cannot create a law that prohibits people from touching a building because that will be contrary to the constitution," she added.

Financing is another perennial problem which heritage groups cannot provide. "We can only provide technical assistance," Turalba said. Some ancestral houses like the Pastor House are lucky to have the financial support of its owners.

REUSE AND RESTORATION

Turalba stressed that adaptive reuse is a feasible alternative to heritage restoration. "Adaptive reuse is something that we have been doing. That’s why the ukay-ukay is flourishing. We turn things around. We convert old things to something news" she said.

The construction of new buildings should not mean the destruction of heritage treasures. Turalba cited the residence of Justice Antonio Villareal, built during the height of Art Deco in Vito Cruz St., Manila. It was refurbished to become the administration office of the Orchid Garden Suite. "It’s (the solution) good. When foreigners come in, they’ll see `ganito pala ang mga bahay natin noon.’"

Another example is the Carcar Dispensary in Cebu, which was originally built by Mayor Mariano Mercado sometime in the 1920s.

Even Luneta Hotel, the only structure reminiscent of French architecture in the country, can be restored to its full glory. Turalba suggested treating it with double windows to filter noise pollution. Upon restoration, the hotel can even put added premium to its services.

Turalba stressed that good design and architectural solutions will ensure higher chances of survival for the building. "If it was properly planned based on ordinances, maintenance cost will be low. That’s the basic rule," she added.

APPRECIATION

FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE


Because the country is in the middle of the international trading pool, cross cultural interaction and influences are inevitable from music to clothing to architecture. Turalba added that "architecture is about culture. Culture is about use of space and different people use it differently. Our own culture asserts itself."

In addition, architecture is a noble and creative profession. In designing, Turalba said "you can discipline people or you can destroy the Filipino people though your architecture. It is being sensitive to the need of the person, to the nature of the person."

She cited the inherent Filipino warmness and hospitality. Part of our culture is to welcome and escort family and relatives to the airport, which should be considered in the design of airport terminals. "A foreigner may not appreciate this but this is our culture. This is us. Isn’t it heartwarming to have all these people waiting to bring you home?"

She also noted the simplicity and effective design of the bahay kubo, which were "crafted by ordinary human beings based on principles of simple logic or common sense. It answered a lot of environmental needs and social needs. The bahay kubo responds to the environment."

During the humid months, the bamboo walls allow the breeze to come in. During the stormy months, residents open the windows so the wind doesn’t topple down the house. "It does not fight the earth but it is a building that dances with the earthquakes. This is `sustainable architecture,’" she added.

Similarly, the bahay na bato of the Spanish period was designed in response to natural calamities. Stone and mortar were only used on the lower floors while wood was extensively used on the upper floors. To soften up the design, walls were accented by wooden doors and window openings were made of capiz to let the light in. Doors for bedrooms are rarely closed. The only attempt at are privacy are the beautiful crochets that curtains the doorway. Turalba observed that Filipinos are generally apathetic and indifferent to old architecture. "When we talk of old houses, you would usually hear criticisms like `pangit kasi hindi modern.’ The move is always towards the modern," she said.

Turalba stressed the importance of heritage which are "physical reminders of our nation. Dito tayo nanggaling. Dito tayo nagmula. Destroying them (heritage structures) means wiping out the Filipinos," she said.

Turalba also noted the dedication to heritage conservation of our Asian neighbors like Japan. Since wood is quite difficult to maintain in buildings, some Japanese temples are being restored by dismantling the entire structure, removing old pieces and putting them back again. A 24-hour brigade also constantly monitors these religious monuments. In Russia, she shared a conversation she had with a taxi driver who said that the government’s priorities in the preservation of their palaces "are nothing compared to my needs."

PRESERVATION, PROMOTION

AND PROFESSIONALISM


Turalba encouraged everyone to do their share in promoting awareness on conservation heritage, especially to the owners of old buildings. "Architects can also have ulterior motives (in conservation heritage because) mas malaki ang professional fee. But you are our allies and not our enemies in heritage conservation. There is a way for you to have your cake and eat it to," she said.

She added: "Our forefathers have left us their ingenuity, of understanding how to build we nature. This is something that we should do, not destroy this earth. As architects, that is your responsibility, your contribution, your pamana to the rest of the Filipino people."

To future architects, Turalba stressed the importance of education and natural curiosity, encouraging them to visit and observe in job sites. She added that female architects are not exempted from working in the construction site. "Don’t you think that (building construction) is one of the most exciting things? From a bare ground, you see a building standing up?" she said.

She added that there are gems hidden even in the most unlikely places. "How many of you have taken the opportunity to go to a housing resettlement?I saw the most beautiful mosaic floor in a squatters residence. Inside the house, the floor was tiled by bottle caps laid out in a very neat pattern."

To her colleagues, aside from continuing education and professionalism, "In the planning of architecture, we do not work on concepts that can be changed overnight. What we have built will be here forever. That is why we have a very big responsibility to our country, to this world."

"As architects, you will be building structures and cities that are here to stay on this earth. When you make a mistake, it will be staring at you to be seen by the world. If you built something beautiful it will be your monument."

The talk was the first of a series of symposium held by the United Architects of the Philippines (UAP) Rizal-Kalayaan 100 Chapter. Sponsored by Crown Asia Compounders, the symposium was held in cooperation with UAP Student Auxiliary-UST (UAPSA-UST) Chapter.

Participants were UAPSA-Adamson University Chapter members, who are also graduating students, led by its chapter president, Jasper Domingo. Other attendees include students of the UST College of Architecture, UST Central Seminary, UST Graduate School, and professionals.

The next series of symposia is set on September 2006 at the Central Colleges of the Philippines. Speakers are architects Dianne Marcelle K. Abistado, UAP, senior architect at St. Luke’s Medical Center, (Heathcare Design and Maintenance), and Jenner P. Macaballug, UAP, (Computer Rendering Tips and Techniques). For inquiries or sponsorship, contact Arch. Boyet Tejuco (0915-403-5707 or 731-5355).

(The author is the president of the UAP Rizal-Kalayaan chapter, the organizer of the symposium.)

http://www.mb.com.ph/archive_pages.p...083072956.html
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Old August 30th, 2006, 09:36 AM   #1091
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Makati seeks to rediscover its past
By Michael Punongbayan
The Philippine Star 08/30/2006

The country’s financial capital, known for its high-rise buildings and commercial centers, now wants to rediscover its past as it steps back in time to unravel its rich culture and traditions.

The Makati City government, with the help of historians and other experts, has launched a Heritage Conservation Program (HCP), which will retrace, re-learn and help residents appreciate the city’s history with the synergy of past and present to foster future growth and development.

Mayor Jejomar Binay said he has foreseen the value of preserving the culture of Makati City anchored in the old adage, "ang hindi marunong lumingon sa pinanggalingan ay hindi makakarating sa paroroonan."

Barangay Poblacion, the historical seat of Makati City’s traditions and governance, has been chosen as the pilot barangay where the first Heritage Zone will rise.

To realize this goal, Binay has sought the assistance of Instituto Cervantes’ Spanish Program for Cultural Cooperation (SPCC) and the FEATI University.

Dr. Julio Galvan, general coordinator of the SPCC has signed an agreement with Binay, which releases to the city government a P200,000 grant that will help fund the cultural mapping of Barangay Poblacion.

Binay said completing the three-way partnership is Feati University represented by its president Dr. Adolfo Jesus Gopez.

The academic institution will provide cultural experts, professors and a research staff that will conduct the cultural mapping of Barangay Poblacion.

"They will document historical structures and landmarks and ingrained practices and beliefs," Binay announced.

He said a heritage preservation plan will be created from the data gathered by the study group up to November this year.

Binay added that he has assembled a committee composed of representatives from the city government, residents and the private sector to oversee the heritage project.

With the help of Instituto Cervantes and Feati University, he expressed confidence in the program that will relive the past for the people of the present while inspiring future generations.


http://philstar.com/philstar/NEWS200608306304.htm
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Old August 30th, 2006, 09:36 AM   #1092
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Makati seeks to rediscover its past
By Michael Punongbayan
The Philippine Star 08/30/2006

The country’s financial capital, known for its high-rise buildings and commercial centers, now wants to rediscover its past as it steps back in time to unravel its rich culture and traditions.

The Makati City government, with the help of historians and other experts, has launched a Heritage Conservation Program (HCP), which will retrace, re-learn and help residents appreciate the city’s history with the synergy of past and present to foster future growth and development.

Mayor Jejomar Binay said he has foreseen the value of preserving the culture of Makati City anchored in the old adage, "ang hindi marunong lumingon sa pinanggalingan ay hindi makakarating sa paroroonan."

Barangay Poblacion, the historical seat of Makati City’s traditions and governance, has been chosen as the pilot barangay where the first Heritage Zone will rise.

To realize this goal, Binay has sought the assistance of Instituto Cervantes’ Spanish Program for Cultural Cooperation (SPCC) and the FEATI University.

Dr. Julio Galvan, general coordinator of the SPCC has signed an agreement with Binay, which releases to the city government a P200,000 grant that will help fund the cultural mapping of Barangay Poblacion.

Binay said completing the three-way partnership is Feati University represented by its president Dr. Adolfo Jesus Gopez.

The academic institution will provide cultural experts, professors and a research staff that will conduct the cultural mapping of Barangay Poblacion.

"They will document historical structures and landmarks and ingrained practices and beliefs," Binay announced.

He said a heritage preservation plan will be created from the data gathered by the study group up to November this year.

Binay added that he has assembled a committee composed of representatives from the city government, residents and the private sector to oversee the heritage project.

With the help of Instituto Cervantes and Feati University, he expressed confidence in the program that will relive the past for the people of the present while inspiring future generations.


http://philstar.com/philstar/NEWS200608306304.htm
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Old August 30th, 2006, 02:32 PM   #1093
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One good point for Binay, I hope he repeatedly do such honorable decisions.
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Old August 30th, 2006, 02:32 PM   #1094
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One good point for Binay, I hope he repeatedly do such honorable decisions.
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Old August 31st, 2006, 03:39 AM   #1095
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i was just browsing my comp station at our cadd class yesterday and i just saw this one folder "elhogar" i'm a fan of elhogar bldg so i save it immediately... so i just wanna share the pics which i got from that computer and thanks to el tyron whoever he is for taking that pics!!!

a view from the other side...


a closer look...








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Last edited by ishtefh_03; August 31st, 2006 at 06:35 AM.
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Old August 31st, 2006, 03:39 AM   #1096
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i was just browsing my comp station at our cadd class yesterday and i just saw this one folder "elhogar" i'm a fan of elhogar bldg so i save it immediately... so i just wanna share the pics which i got from that computer and thanks to el tyron whoever he is for taking that pics!!!

a view from the other side...


a closer look...








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Pontificia et Regalis Sancti Thomae Aquinatis Universitas Manilana
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Old August 31st, 2006, 03:41 AM   #1097
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ooppss!! the photos are too big... sensya na, more pics soon (the architectural details of elhogar and interior photos of it too...) i'll resize it first.
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Old August 31st, 2006, 03:41 AM   #1098
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ooppss!! the photos are too big... sensya na, more pics soon (the architectural details of elhogar and interior photos of it too...) i'll resize it first.
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Old August 31st, 2006, 05:20 AM   #1099
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Great find Steph! The big pictures actually help us see the architectural details of El Hogar better.
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Old August 31st, 2006, 05:20 AM   #1100
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Great find Steph! The big pictures actually help us see the architectural details of El Hogar better.
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