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Old December 27th, 2006, 05:00 AM   #1701
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The Bengzon UN error:









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Old December 27th, 2006, 07:35 AM   #1702
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Here's something that blue-blood collectors of finer Philippine items will snub, but collectors of Fil-Am cultural pieces would find it alluring! Fun and cool stuff, there's always someone to collect something, right?

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Old December 27th, 2006, 08:58 AM   #1703
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hello ivan,

Regarding the World Monument Watch, can I suggest to nominate the Linapacan Spanish Fort in the remote Calamian islands of Palawan . It was built during the 17th century to protect the local community from intruders. Apparently, no one knew of it's exact location since it was so hidden, until a foreigner living in the Philippines "discovered" it. It;s greatest threat is neglect, natural aging, and as you can see from the website, overgrown plants and trees that endanger the structure of the site.

To see more info and photos, just google the name "islomaniac" and click on his photo albums. It's under Linapacan Spanish Fort.

thanks and let me know what you think :-)

and the photo link...

http://travel.webshots.com/album/214623945uqomvu
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Old December 27th, 2006, 08:58 AM   #1704
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hello ivan,

Regarding the World Monument Watch, can I suggest to nominate the Linapacan Spanish Fort in the remote Calamian islands of Palawan . It was built during the 17th century to protect the local community from intruders. Apparently, no one knew of it's exact location since it was so hidden, until a foreigner living in the Philippines "discovered" it. It;s greatest threat is neglect, natural aging, and as you can see from the website, overgrown plants and trees that endanger the structure of the site.

To see more info and photos, just google the name "islomaniac" and click on his photo albums. It's under Linapacan Spanish Fort.

thanks and let me know what you think :-)

and the photo link...

http://travel.webshots.com/album/214623945uqomvu
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Old December 27th, 2006, 02:27 PM   #1705
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Got this in my blog. Help needed...

good day!.... i was wondering if you have an old pictures of plaza hugo?... it is beside the sta ana church in manila, or maybe some background data about the plaza.
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Old December 27th, 2006, 02:27 PM   #1706
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Got this in my blog. Help needed...

good day!.... i was wondering if you have an old pictures of plaza hugo?... it is beside the sta ana church in manila, or maybe some background data about the plaza.
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Old December 28th, 2006, 05:49 AM   #1707
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THE windswept rolling terrain of Naidi Hills and its stately lighthouse.

BOON OR BANE?
WINDS OF CHANGE IN BATANES
http://www.businessmirror.com.ph/12282006/life01.html
Text and photos by Benjamin Layug

Breathtaking Batanes is unlike anything I have been used to in a sprawling metropolis. Crime, like the traffic and its dust and pollution, is almost nonexistent. No drugs, no smuggling, no kidnapping. Here, they leave the doors of houses open all day (and even at night). Here, I can sleep overnight in the park or along the shore without fear of mugging. Bikes, scooters and occasional jeepneys and tricycles are the only means of transportation. There are no rich or poor; no squatters or beggars. The brilliance of the moon, the stars and even some of the planets are not blocked by smog or glaring neon lights. The air I inhaled, as well as the fish, fruits, vegetables and meat I ate were fresh, with no preservatives added. I can also drink directly from the faucet without fear. The “ordinary” food fare I ate consisted of spiny lobster (payi), coconut crabs (tatus), flying fish (dibang) and Spanish mackerel (tanigi), complemented by delicious yellow rice (supas), all served on leaves of a local bread fruit tree called kabaya.

Everybody is likely to know everybody and youngsters here are respectful. Ivatans take hospitality to its highest level, welcoming the ipula (outsider) with open doors and a Sumdep kamu (“Please come in”) or greet him with a Kapian ka nu Dios (“May God be with you”). The traditional community spirit or bayanihan (locally called yaru) remains high here. There are no moviehouses, no bars or beer joints, no markets (food is sold door-to-door) or shopping centers. After sunset, the streets are unlit and practically empty. This 10-island miniarchipelago is also a study in contrast. It is the smallest province in terms of area and population yet the literacy rate and professional education index among Ivatans is a high 95 percent. Truly like the Utopia of Sir Thomas More, or the Shangri-La in The Lost Horizon. However, change came in the form of a 24-hour power source, cable TV, cell sites and Internet access.

Such a province, with its landscape of unsurpassed beauty, needs to be preserved. On January 5, 2001, by virtue of RA 8991, the islands were proclaimed a protected area by the DENR. Recently, the Unesco listed Batanes as the country’s sixth World Heritage site due to its mix of unique and ancient archeology and architecture. The listing could help raise awareness about the preservation of the heritage sites and local authorities may receive financial assistance or expert advice from Unesco on ways to maintain the site.

As a result of the listing, Batanes’ reputation as a new frontier tourist destination has grown but this has been greeted with mixed feelings by the local government. The number of local and foreign tourist arrivals has increased, providing additional revenues as professional employment opportunities here are scarce. However, these same tourists may overwhelm preservation sites such as pre-Hispanic burial sites and idjangs and the traditional houses. Gov. Vicente Gato hopes that from this listing, the national government, as well as other groups, will provide more assistance and endowments or grants to preserve these fragile Ivatan sites. If the governor would have his way, he prefers quality tourists who appreciate Ivatan culture or those who would help preserve this heritage. Besides, Batanes’ existing tourism infrastructure simply can’t support and accommodate too many tourists.

What has made Batanes so deserving of such an honor? For one, Batanes is unique among Philippine provinces. The people (the honest, hardy and inscrutable Ivatans trace their roots to prehistoric Formosan immigrants with their almond eyes and latter-day Spaniards with their aquiline noses), the language (the Ivatan dialect is peppered with pidgin Spanish and spoken with the tonal musicality of the Chinese language), the weather (generally cooler, balmier and quite windy with practically 4 seasons including a “winter”), the crafts, and even the boats used (the wide, round-bottomed, bathtub-shaped and plank-built boat called falowa and not the banca is used) are all different.

The Ivatan’s ingeniously designed, typhoon-resistant houses (locally called sinandumparan) are found all over the province and nowhere else (the lowland bahay kubo simply will not survive here). These squat, low, solid stone-and-lime cottages, not unlike those in the Scottish Highlands or France’s Provencal region, have meter-thick walls, are built directly to the ground and are laid out on narrow, cobbled streets that follow the contour of the land. They are cool during the warm season and warm in the cold months.
The gabled roofs have foot-thick cogon tightly bound and woven together to make it waterproof and fastened with reeds to sturdy wooden rafters. The roof is held down by a panpet (a thick rope roof net) fastened to strong pegs on large, half-buried stones. The small, narrow door faces the east or northeast, away from the worst typhoon winds. Tiny, square windows are located on three walls only. The wall that doesn’t have it faces the direction of the strongest winds during typhoons.

One such house, the House of Dakay, the oldest in Batanes, is included on the Unesco list and expected for grading. Now resided in by octogenarian Florestida Estrella, it was built in 1887 by Jose Dacay (Florestida’s grandfather). The friendly Florestida, with her easy smile and weather-beaten face, was formerly only used to a quiet village existence. Now, her tiny world has been opened to many foreign and local tourists who take her picture, making her the subject of many articles, postcards and promotional calendars. Florestida keeps a blue logbook containing the names of visitors over the past years.

Like Florestida, the Ivatan’s tiny world may soon be open to tourism. Let’s just hope it doesn’t destroy the very character that made it known in the first place.
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Old December 28th, 2006, 05:49 AM   #1708
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THE windswept rolling terrain of Naidi Hills and its stately lighthouse.

BOON OR BANE?
WINDS OF CHANGE IN BATANES
http://www.businessmirror.com.ph/12282006/life01.html
Text and photos by Benjamin Layug

Breathtaking Batanes is unlike anything I have been used to in a sprawling metropolis. Crime, like the traffic and its dust and pollution, is almost nonexistent. No drugs, no smuggling, no kidnapping. Here, they leave the doors of houses open all day (and even at night). Here, I can sleep overnight in the park or along the shore without fear of mugging. Bikes, scooters and occasional jeepneys and tricycles are the only means of transportation. There are no rich or poor; no squatters or beggars. The brilliance of the moon, the stars and even some of the planets are not blocked by smog or glaring neon lights. The air I inhaled, as well as the fish, fruits, vegetables and meat I ate were fresh, with no preservatives added. I can also drink directly from the faucet without fear. The “ordinary” food fare I ate consisted of spiny lobster (payi), coconut crabs (tatus), flying fish (dibang) and Spanish mackerel (tanigi), complemented by delicious yellow rice (supas), all served on leaves of a local bread fruit tree called kabaya.

Everybody is likely to know everybody and youngsters here are respectful. Ivatans take hospitality to its highest level, welcoming the ipula (outsider) with open doors and a Sumdep kamu (“Please come in”) or greet him with a Kapian ka nu Dios (“May God be with you”). The traditional community spirit or bayanihan (locally called yaru) remains high here. There are no moviehouses, no bars or beer joints, no markets (food is sold door-to-door) or shopping centers. After sunset, the streets are unlit and practically empty. This 10-island miniarchipelago is also a study in contrast. It is the smallest province in terms of area and population yet the literacy rate and professional education index among Ivatans is a high 95 percent. Truly like the Utopia of Sir Thomas More, or the Shangri-La in The Lost Horizon. However, change came in the form of a 24-hour power source, cable TV, cell sites and Internet access.

Such a province, with its landscape of unsurpassed beauty, needs to be preserved. On January 5, 2001, by virtue of RA 8991, the islands were proclaimed a protected area by the DENR. Recently, the Unesco listed Batanes as the country’s sixth World Heritage site due to its mix of unique and ancient archeology and architecture. The listing could help raise awareness about the preservation of the heritage sites and local authorities may receive financial assistance or expert advice from Unesco on ways to maintain the site.

As a result of the listing, Batanes’ reputation as a new frontier tourist destination has grown but this has been greeted with mixed feelings by the local government. The number of local and foreign tourist arrivals has increased, providing additional revenues as professional employment opportunities here are scarce. However, these same tourists may overwhelm preservation sites such as pre-Hispanic burial sites and idjangs and the traditional houses. Gov. Vicente Gato hopes that from this listing, the national government, as well as other groups, will provide more assistance and endowments or grants to preserve these fragile Ivatan sites. If the governor would have his way, he prefers quality tourists who appreciate Ivatan culture or those who would help preserve this heritage. Besides, Batanes’ existing tourism infrastructure simply can’t support and accommodate too many tourists.

What has made Batanes so deserving of such an honor? For one, Batanes is unique among Philippine provinces. The people (the honest, hardy and inscrutable Ivatans trace their roots to prehistoric Formosan immigrants with their almond eyes and latter-day Spaniards with their aquiline noses), the language (the Ivatan dialect is peppered with pidgin Spanish and spoken with the tonal musicality of the Chinese language), the weather (generally cooler, balmier and quite windy with practically 4 seasons including a “winter”), the crafts, and even the boats used (the wide, round-bottomed, bathtub-shaped and plank-built boat called falowa and not the banca is used) are all different.

The Ivatan’s ingeniously designed, typhoon-resistant houses (locally called sinandumparan) are found all over the province and nowhere else (the lowland bahay kubo simply will not survive here). These squat, low, solid stone-and-lime cottages, not unlike those in the Scottish Highlands or France’s Provencal region, have meter-thick walls, are built directly to the ground and are laid out on narrow, cobbled streets that follow the contour of the land. They are cool during the warm season and warm in the cold months.
The gabled roofs have foot-thick cogon tightly bound and woven together to make it waterproof and fastened with reeds to sturdy wooden rafters. The roof is held down by a panpet (a thick rope roof net) fastened to strong pegs on large, half-buried stones. The small, narrow door faces the east or northeast, away from the worst typhoon winds. Tiny, square windows are located on three walls only. The wall that doesn’t have it faces the direction of the strongest winds during typhoons.

One such house, the House of Dakay, the oldest in Batanes, is included on the Unesco list and expected for grading. Now resided in by octogenarian Florestida Estrella, it was built in 1887 by Jose Dacay (Florestida’s grandfather). The friendly Florestida, with her easy smile and weather-beaten face, was formerly only used to a quiet village existence. Now, her tiny world has been opened to many foreign and local tourists who take her picture, making her the subject of many articles, postcards and promotional calendars. Florestida keeps a blue logbook containing the names of visitors over the past years.

Like Florestida, the Ivatan’s tiny world may soon be open to tourism. Let’s just hope it doesn’t destroy the very character that made it known in the first place.
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Old December 28th, 2006, 06:01 AM   #1709
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Oh yes, Batanes is beautiful. I've been to Basco and it was really idyllic. The native houses are really sturdy and can withstand the elements there. The sight of rolling hills amidst the seascape was such a beauty to behold. I had stayed in the monastery compoun ran by the Monsignor there. He was very strict with keeping the peace inside the surroundings so no late night revelry. The people were very friendly and serene. It was wonderful experience.
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Old December 28th, 2006, 06:01 AM   #1710
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Oh yes, Batanes is beautiful. I've been to Basco and it was really idyllic. The native houses are really sturdy and can withstand the elements there. The sight of rolling hills amidst the seascape was such a beauty to behold. I had stayed in the monastery compoun ran by the Monsignor there. He was very strict with keeping the peace inside the surroundings so no late night revelry. The people were very friendly and serene. It was wonderful experience.
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Old December 28th, 2006, 06:55 AM   #1711
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lili View Post
Oh yes, Batanes is beautiful. I've been to Basco and it was really idyllic. The native houses are really sturdy and can withstand the elements there. The sight of rolling hills amidst the seascape was such a beauty to behold. I had stayed in the monastery compoun ran by the Monsignor there. He was very strict with keeping the peace inside the surroundings so no late night revelry. The people were very friendly and serene. It was wonderful experience.
@ Lili: Ooooh...nakakaselos ako! I've always wanted to venture up there--so historic and so bucolic! Did you get to see the "idjangs" (ancient fortifications of the Ivatan people) during your stay?


Nervously, here's another piece of Philippine treasure requiring protection from becoming another Boracay...I know that's an inaccurate comparison, but what I'm trying to say is that the outside world must be made to respect and not disrupt the harmonious stability that has kept Batanes beautiful.

There's a whole complex Ivatan culture up there, and it'll be fast endangered if tourism is allowed to run rampant! Thankfully, God has situated the Batanes isles amid treacherous sea currents and nasty typhoons to protect them from alien encroachment. Education is the key, and the Ivatans will hopefully take an active role in seeing that their islands remain uniquely beautiful for future generations to appreciate as well.

Peace and Diyos mamagus! (spelling?)
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Old December 28th, 2006, 06:55 AM   #1712
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lili View Post
Oh yes, Batanes is beautiful. I've been to Basco and it was really idyllic. The native houses are really sturdy and can withstand the elements there. The sight of rolling hills amidst the seascape was such a beauty to behold. I had stayed in the monastery compoun ran by the Monsignor there. He was very strict with keeping the peace inside the surroundings so no late night revelry. The people were very friendly and serene. It was wonderful experience.
@ Lili: Ooooh...nakakaselos ako! I've always wanted to venture up there--so historic and so bucolic! Did you get to see the "idjangs" (ancient fortifications of the Ivatan people) during your stay?


Nervously, here's another piece of Philippine treasure requiring protection from becoming another Boracay...I know that's an inaccurate comparison, but what I'm trying to say is that the outside world must be made to respect and not disrupt the harmonious stability that has kept Batanes beautiful.

There's a whole complex Ivatan culture up there, and it'll be fast endangered if tourism is allowed to run rampant! Thankfully, God has situated the Batanes isles amid treacherous sea currents and nasty typhoons to protect them from alien encroachment. Education is the key, and the Ivatans will hopefully take an active role in seeing that their islands remain uniquely beautiful for future generations to appreciate as well.

Peace and Diyos mamagus! (spelling?)
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Old December 28th, 2006, 07:31 AM   #1713
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Something along the lines of our national patrimony...now up for grabs on a popular online auction site: attributed to Fabian de la Rosa!



Arekup! If I were a rich man...
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Old December 28th, 2006, 08:19 AM   #1714
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawayano View Post
Something along the lines of our national patrimony...now up for grabs on a popular online auction site: attributed to Fabian de la Rosa!



Arekup! If I were a rich man...
A painting by Fabian de la Rosa? Too rich for my blood. May I ask what auction site?
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Old December 28th, 2006, 08:44 AM   #1715
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Las Piñas for armchair tourist

By Jocelyn Uy
Inquirer
Last updated 11:00pm (Mla time) 12/25/2006

DISCOVER the rich cultural past of Las Piñas City in the comfort of your home.

"Las Pinas: A City of Heritage," a comprehensive hardbound book funded by Sen. Manny Villar and his wife, Rep. Cynthia Villar, was launched recently to help stir among Filipinos interest and cultural pride in the city.

Visitacion de la Torre, one of the authors, said the city "has been shaped by the marriage of faith and romance."

In the book's prologue, she said, "Faith here refers to the kind of spirituality that Fr. Diego Cera made palpable when he spent 37 years of his life improving the town, building the St. Joseph Church and the one-of-a-kind bamboo organ famous the world over.

"As to romance, it works around the concept of the freedom of the creative spirit to produce a masterpiece, like the bamboo organ, the jeepney, the parol, the St. Joseph Church … this is the romance that empowers the people of Las Piñas to rise beyond poverty, unemployment or mediocrity."

The 220-page book has two parts. The first part tells of the city's beginnings as a nondescript barrio of Parañaque when the Spaniards set foot in Manila in the 16th century and how it labored to achieve its own identity and preserve its culture.

The second part, written by Joyce Crisanto, is an account of the city's transformation from a town into a thriving, urban metropolis "with strong egalitarian and environment leanings."

Graphs, charts, and photographs from ancient structures and old townsfolk to today's modern buildings and leaders contribute to the vivid account of Las Piñas' development.

"It is a colorful book about [unforgettable] characters walking the stage that is called Las Piñas...one of the top 10 cities in the country and a very historical one. We hope that (the book) would also strengthen and deepen the residents' love for the city," Crisanto told the Inquirer in an interview.

The publication also features the city's little treasures: A few surviving salt beds in an old district; a bamboo museum with 28 of 32 species growing along the Las Piñas River and the parol center, which has produced three generations of Christmas lantern makers whose products continue to brighten up many homes in Metro Manila during the holiday season.

Commercial establishments like malls, factories and livelihood centers are also highlighted.

Crisanto hoped that the book--"a handy reference"--would lead to more comprehensive volumes containing residents' personal memories of the city.

"Leafing through the pages of the book is the best way to discover our city," said Las Piñas Rep. Cynthia Villar during the book launching two weeks ago.

The book will be available in bookstores early next year, Crisanto said.


Copyright 2006 Inquirer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquire...ticle_id=40165
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Old December 28th, 2006, 08:44 AM   #1716
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Las Piñas for armchair tourist

By Jocelyn Uy
Inquirer
Last updated 11:00pm (Mla time) 12/25/2006

DISCOVER the rich cultural past of Las Piñas City in the comfort of your home.

"Las Pinas: A City of Heritage," a comprehensive hardbound book funded by Sen. Manny Villar and his wife, Rep. Cynthia Villar, was launched recently to help stir among Filipinos interest and cultural pride in the city.

Visitacion de la Torre, one of the authors, said the city "has been shaped by the marriage of faith and romance."

In the book's prologue, she said, "Faith here refers to the kind of spirituality that Fr. Diego Cera made palpable when he spent 37 years of his life improving the town, building the St. Joseph Church and the one-of-a-kind bamboo organ famous the world over.

"As to romance, it works around the concept of the freedom of the creative spirit to produce a masterpiece, like the bamboo organ, the jeepney, the parol, the St. Joseph Church … this is the romance that empowers the people of Las Piñas to rise beyond poverty, unemployment or mediocrity."

The 220-page book has two parts. The first part tells of the city's beginnings as a nondescript barrio of Parañaque when the Spaniards set foot in Manila in the 16th century and how it labored to achieve its own identity and preserve its culture.

The second part, written by Joyce Crisanto, is an account of the city's transformation from a town into a thriving, urban metropolis "with strong egalitarian and environment leanings."

Graphs, charts, and photographs from ancient structures and old townsfolk to today's modern buildings and leaders contribute to the vivid account of Las Piñas' development.

"It is a colorful book about [unforgettable] characters walking the stage that is called Las Piñas...one of the top 10 cities in the country and a very historical one. We hope that (the book) would also strengthen and deepen the residents' love for the city," Crisanto told the Inquirer in an interview.

The publication also features the city's little treasures: A few surviving salt beds in an old district; a bamboo museum with 28 of 32 species growing along the Las Piñas River and the parol center, which has produced three generations of Christmas lantern makers whose products continue to brighten up many homes in Metro Manila during the holiday season.

Commercial establishments like malls, factories and livelihood centers are also highlighted.

Crisanto hoped that the book--"a handy reference"--would lead to more comprehensive volumes containing residents' personal memories of the city.

"Leafing through the pages of the book is the best way to discover our city," said Las Piñas Rep. Cynthia Villar during the book launching two weeks ago.

The book will be available in bookstores early next year, Crisanto said.


Copyright 2006 Inquirer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquire...ticle_id=40165
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Old December 28th, 2006, 08:45 PM   #1717
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Gabaldon Schools and other Heritage School Buildings

We are going to celebrate the centennial of the Gabaldon Act in 2007. It would be nice to document all the schoolhouses that were built as a result of that law. Here are two links to start with...

HCS Database (Gabaldon Schools)
The Gabaldon Legacy

Hope you could post your photos of Gabaldon schools and other heritage school buildings here. Thanks!



Those Gabaldons
By Gemma Cruz Araneta

PUBLIC schools were to the American colonial regime what Baroque churches were to the Spanish period. In their time, both were the most imposing structures in all our provinces, cities and towns. As Spain used religion to colonize and Hispanize, the United States of America established the public education system for "pacification" and Americanization.

Lamentably for heritage conservation, most of the school houses built during the Spanish colonial period were reduced to rubble during the Philippine-American War (1899-1911) and when the Philippine Commission sent the American Secretary of War a telegram about the "pacification" strategy, Eng. Edgar K. Bourne was instructed to go to Manila. Daniel Burnham, famous city planner, and other American architects soon followed.

Acting rapidly, the Philippine Commission passed Act No. 268 creating the Bureau of Architecture and Construction of Public Buildings, with Mr. Bourne as its head. The construction of schoolhouses in Manila and the provinces began and this activity was viewed as the most important work of the Bureau.

No sooner was the Philippine Assembly formed after the elections of 1907, when Act No. 1801, authored by Assemblyman Isauro Gabaldon of Nueva Ecija, was approved and became widely known as GABALDON ACT . This appropriated Php 1 million between 1907 to 1915 for the "construction of schoolhouses of strong materials in barrios with guaranteed daily attendance of not less than sixty pupils…"

Funds for each school could not exceed Php 4 thousand unless the municipality contributed a counterpart sum of not less than fifty percent of the total amount granted to it by virtue of the Gabaldon Act. The municipality was authorized to appropriate its own funds, receive voluntary contributions in cash, kind, or in manual labor, for the construction of schoolhouses.

The Gabaldon Act stipulated that only on land owned by the municipality could schools be constructed. Because proposed sites had to be surveyed and registered with the Court of Land Registration, very few schools were erected in the first three years. As separate planning for each school was burdensome, the Bureau of Public Works and Bureau of Education soon came up with standardized designs. These were known as "Gabaldon School Buildings" or simply "Gabaldon," long after the expiration of Act 1801.

Fifty-one "Gabaldons" were completed by 1911 and by 1916, four hundred five more were constructed bringing the total number of classrooms to one thousand eight hundred fifty-two. Three hundred twenty seven of these "Gabaldons" were made of concrete. In the Gabaldon-style school, there was architectural harmony between the main building and other accessory structures. As it turned out, an elegantly-designed school instilled in both teachers and students a certain pride and an appreciation for the finer things in life.
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Old December 28th, 2006, 08:57 PM   #1718
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonderboy View Post
Below is a letter I received c/o Ms Bambi Harper. I hope we can help the Corregidor folks regarding this new problem:

URGENT: Appeal for help to save Corregidor Island

Greetings!

Recent disturbing events have spurred me to intervene in what
I think are senseless projects which will accomplish nothing but
ruin the beauty and significance of Corregidor Island.

I am talking about an ongoing project of the Philippine
National Historic Commission to renovate or give a makeover
to Middleside Barracks.

I happen to be the son of a Corregidor veteran, and so I feel very
strongly about how Corregidor is preserved for future generations.
We need to keep the memory of the men and women who fought
in World War II, fresh in the collective memory of our people.

Please check out this link so you'll see what I mean:

http://www.geocities.com/savecorregidor

I am quite sure that you will be outraged at how they are
handling this project.

I am trying to drum up support from conservation and veteran groups
so that this project can be stopped before it is too late. I hear that Mile
Long Barracks is next!

Your support would really go a long way in preserving Corregidor
Island - The Fortress of Freedom.

Your help, comments and suggestions would be greatly
appreciated.

Please forward this message to those whom you know
share our sentiments.

Sincerely yours,

Jay Ramos

If you want to help us with our campaign to preserve Corregidor Island, please email us and we'll get in touch with you. Our email address: savecorregidor@yahoo.com.

Likewise, send an email to the National Historic Commission and give them your opinion about this project. Their email address can be obtained from their website at:
http://www.nhi.gov.ph

Or, voice your support and write the Corregidor Foundation, Inc.:
agm@compass.com.ph

I knew something was just not right when I received that e-mail which is why I didn't do shout-outs in my blog like I usually do when I receive things like these. I guess it was because I knew the people involved and know how consultative they are.

Only saw the reply today. I agree that WWII history is not quite noticed in the Philippines. The A-Bomb Dome in Hiroshima is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. I think the World War II Sites in Bataan and Corregidor should be nominated to the list.

Anyway, here is the reply...


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Leslie Ann Murray
Date: Dec 18, 2006 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: On-going "clean-up" at Middleside Barracks threatens to destroy Corregidor

Hi Ivan...Thanks for sending this....Art and Corregidor Foundation, Inc. - (CFI) and F.A.M.E. are already "on" this...and think we have managed to dispel some of the "negatives" Jay has circulated. The NHI and the Dept of Budget and Management are the agencies which have provided the finances and the plan...and as I explained to Jay - we have (since 1998) been pursueing funds and techinal help for this project to "save Corregidor) - spoken directly with some UNESCO reps, followed up with them, applied to other such agencies, Mrs. Romulo even made pleas through personal contacts with influential people abroad, Toti Villalon has been out the the island...the list is considerable...Jay even sat in on some of our FAME meetings when the plea and need for preservation and funds for same was discussed....

BUT --- no positive reaction from any quarter for years - all has fallen on deaf ears (you know the story when it comes to funding for heritage!) ...finally we were able to get some minimal (in relation to the actual scope of the work that needs to be done) support for the work.....and now we have critics and "brickbats" from people who claim to be "concerned" ...well, I am glad if it awakens the public to the need (where was the "support" in the past!!???) ...well, you know how it is....

Anyway - Jay is now ready to help us out by doing a video and this may help to get the considerable amounts we need --- amazing how UNESCO can save the terraces and the churches --- and here we have vestiges of one of the most famous chapters in recent history on the doorstep that could bring in a whole niche market of visiors (WWII survivor - and fatality - families; historians, etc.) to a site that really turned the tide of that war - and no body (until now) has seemed to care. I can fill you in properly on all we have been trying to do and why the work in progress is so necessary - but am up to my ears in just getting our AmCham publication to press before the holidays - so after that will pass on all...We have photos of the deterioration - and also of all the "positive" things we have accomplished on CI that seem to have escaped attention...isn't it always the way???

Many thanks again and hope the "other side of the coin" is seen too.

No - I did not make it to the festival - as I wrote the mayors office, we had a long-standing personal commitment for that night...I enquired if there was a chance to see the lanterns on display afterwards - like this week? - but did not get a reply. If you have any news on this please let me know....???

Many thanks for keeping in touch - and all best for a Merry Christmas - and to success in heritage endeavors in the new year!!!!

Leslie
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Old December 28th, 2006, 08:57 PM   #1719
ivanhenares
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonderboy View Post
Below is a letter I received c/o Ms Bambi Harper. I hope we can help the Corregidor folks regarding this new problem:

URGENT: Appeal for help to save Corregidor Island

Greetings!

Recent disturbing events have spurred me to intervene in what
I think are senseless projects which will accomplish nothing but
ruin the beauty and significance of Corregidor Island.

I am talking about an ongoing project of the Philippine
National Historic Commission to renovate or give a makeover
to Middleside Barracks.

I happen to be the son of a Corregidor veteran, and so I feel very
strongly about how Corregidor is preserved for future generations.
We need to keep the memory of the men and women who fought
in World War II, fresh in the collective memory of our people.

Please check out this link so you'll see what I mean:

http://www.geocities.com/savecorregidor

I am quite sure that you will be outraged at how they are
handling this project.

I am trying to drum up support from conservation and veteran groups
so that this project can be stopped before it is too late. I hear that Mile
Long Barracks is next!

Your support would really go a long way in preserving Corregidor
Island - The Fortress of Freedom.

Your help, comments and suggestions would be greatly
appreciated.

Please forward this message to those whom you know
share our sentiments.

Sincerely yours,

Jay Ramos

If you want to help us with our campaign to preserve Corregidor Island, please email us and we'll get in touch with you. Our email address: savecorregidor@yahoo.com.

Likewise, send an email to the National Historic Commission and give them your opinion about this project. Their email address can be obtained from their website at:
http://www.nhi.gov.ph

Or, voice your support and write the Corregidor Foundation, Inc.:
agm@compass.com.ph

I knew something was just not right when I received that e-mail which is why I didn't do shout-outs in my blog like I usually do when I receive things like these. I guess it was because I knew the people involved and know how consultative they are.

Only saw the reply today. I agree that WWII history is not quite noticed in the Philippines. The A-Bomb Dome in Hiroshima is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. I think the World War II Sites in Bataan and Corregidor should be nominated to the list.

Anyway, here is the reply...


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Leslie Ann Murray
Date: Dec 18, 2006 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: On-going "clean-up" at Middleside Barracks threatens to destroy Corregidor

Hi Ivan...Thanks for sending this....Art and Corregidor Foundation, Inc. - (CFI) and F.A.M.E. are already "on" this...and think we have managed to dispel some of the "negatives" Jay has circulated. The NHI and the Dept of Budget and Management are the agencies which have provided the finances and the plan...and as I explained to Jay - we have (since 1998) been pursueing funds and techinal help for this project to "save Corregidor) - spoken directly with some UNESCO reps, followed up with them, applied to other such agencies, Mrs. Romulo even made pleas through personal contacts with influential people abroad, Toti Villalon has been out the the island...the list is considerable...Jay even sat in on some of our FAME meetings when the plea and need for preservation and funds for same was discussed....

BUT --- no positive reaction from any quarter for years - all has fallen on deaf ears (you know the story when it comes to funding for heritage!) ...finally we were able to get some minimal (in relation to the actual scope of the work that needs to be done) support for the work.....and now we have critics and "brickbats" from people who claim to be "concerned" ...well, I am glad if it awakens the public to the need (where was the "support" in the past!!???) ...well, you know how it is....

Anyway - Jay is now ready to help us out by doing a video and this may help to get the considerable amounts we need --- amazing how UNESCO can save the terraces and the churches --- and here we have vestiges of one of the most famous chapters in recent history on the doorstep that could bring in a whole niche market of visiors (WWII survivor - and fatality - families; historians, etc.) to a site that really turned the tide of that war - and no body (until now) has seemed to care. I can fill you in properly on all we have been trying to do and why the work in progress is so necessary - but am up to my ears in just getting our AmCham publication to press before the holidays - so after that will pass on all...We have photos of the deterioration - and also of all the "positive" things we have accomplished on CI that seem to have escaped attention...isn't it always the way???

Many thanks again and hope the "other side of the coin" is seen too.

No - I did not make it to the festival - as I wrote the mayors office, we had a long-standing personal commitment for that night...I enquired if there was a chance to see the lanterns on display afterwards - like this week? - but did not get a reply. If you have any news on this please let me know....???

Many thanks for keeping in touch - and all best for a Merry Christmas - and to success in heritage endeavors in the new year!!!!

Leslie
__________________
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ivanhenares no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 28th, 2006, 08:59 PM   #1720
Lili
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Very informative blog @Ivan. So, those schools are called Gabaldon Schools after Assemblyman Isauro Gabaldon who authored the legislative act for apportionment of funds for their construction. Very interesting.

I am very much fascinated by the Legarda Elementary School on Lealtad. The structure is beautiful even the interiors. I don't know if that falls under the Gabaldon Act. Hopefully, someone will be able to take a picture of that.
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