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Old November 24th, 2008, 11:42 PM   #1
Ramses
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Cemeteries in your city

I don’t know if there are forummers over here who are interested in cemeteries just like me, but i’ll give it a try anyway. I am very interested in cemeteries all over the world. These places are very often neglected by tourists when visiting a city, but these places could be very interesting because they give a view into a culture’s perspective on death. Every culture attaches different meaning to these places of death which results in different types of graves, different ways of spatial organization and different ideas about maintenance in cemeteries all over the world. Do you have any pictures and information about cemeteries in your own city or country?
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Old November 24th, 2008, 11:43 PM   #2
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I’ll start with a short series of a cemetery in my hometown Leeuwarden (the Netherlands). The maintenance of cemeteries in the northern protestant part of the Netherlands is often very poor.

1. The entrance building


2. This cemetery was designed in the late nineteenth century. In this time English landscape planning was very popular.


3.


4.


5.


6.
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Old November 25th, 2008, 02:00 AM   #3
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Certain cemeteries in Chicago are most certainly big tourist attractions -- on account of the people buried there and the monuments...

I visit Graceland Cemetery a few times a year....

Pictures from Flickr.

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The Palmers:

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Sullivan headstone:

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The Pullmans:

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Burnham:

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"Eternal Silence"

image hosted on flickr
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Old November 25th, 2008, 02:51 AM   #4
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Old November 25th, 2008, 04:38 AM   #5
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my city's two main cemeteries are completely distinct from each other. I only found a pic of the new one, but showing it would not reflect the local reality, but both are different from the Anglo-saxon tradition, which uses grass and is like a garden, ours aren't like that. Formerly people where buried in churches, so local cemeteries only exist from the 19th century on, when the population started accepting, by force. although we still have stone age cemeteries!
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Old November 25th, 2008, 04:40 AM   #6
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I am so glad you started this thread! I am a huge fan of cemeteries, and love strolling through them when I travel. Here are some pictures from one of our cemeteries here in Toronto that I took this summer, and put into my photothread. Mount Pleasant Cemetery:






this is of a Greek family... looks like Alexander the Great to me!















I'll bet that twisted, gnarled old tree beside the grave was planted 100 years ago, when the grave was new. Beauty still springs from it:











Sargeant Pepper?



I think cemetaries look most beautiful in the Autumn, and Winter:



again, these Cedars were probably planted around the new gravestone.









Now I stroll down Millionaire's Row, with all the big tycoons and important family
Mausoleums!!

This most impressive temple belongs to one of Canada's most historically prominent
families.. The Eaton family:







This part of the cemetary overlooks one of Toronto's beautiful ravines:



It doesn't look like it, but that is a very long drop down to the bottom of the ravine:







Pretty leaves from a mighty oak tree:







these crypts have glass windows on the doors, so you can look in and see the handsome stained glass windows. By luck, when I was there, the sun was behind the crypts, illuminating the windows magnificently:













this window really is a beauty. I assume it is Gabriel, blowing his horn:

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Old November 25th, 2008, 12:38 PM   #7
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^Impressive! How old are these monumental style graves? Are most of these graves from the previous centuries or do they still build these monuments nowadays in Toronto and Chicago? I remember from a visit to a cemetery in Figueres (Spain) that new tombes were still under construction. The only difference was that the new tombes were not as decorated as the old ones.
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Old November 25th, 2008, 03:39 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ramses View Post
^Impressive! How old are these monumental style graves? Are most of these graves from the previous centuries or do they still build these monuments nowadays in Toronto and Chicago? I remember from a visit to a cemetery in Figueres (Spain) that new tombes were still under construction. The only difference was that the new tombes were not as decorated as the old ones.

Thanks Ramses for starting this thread. The ones in Chicago are only from the 19th century (Chicago being a 19th century foundation) So it is not as old as those in Europe or even the East Coast of the US. And from what I see, they don't build them like they used to, although you still see very interesting modern ones...

I always visit Père-Lachaise whenever I am in Paris -- not "my" city, but I'll do it anyway... And I always buy bunches of flowers to put on my favorite graves.

Some of the ones I always visit...

Pictures from Flickr:

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Chopin:

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Bizet:

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Callas:

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Balzac:

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Wilde:

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Delacroix:

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The Divine Sarah:

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The immortal Proust:

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In all the times I have stayed in Paris, I have only been to Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois once: to pay homage to Nureyev, or course.


Last edited by tpe; November 25th, 2008 at 07:20 PM.
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Old November 25th, 2008, 06:46 PM   #9
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It has always struck me that the 19th century was a kind of a Golden Age for cemeteries in many cities. The Magnificent Seven cemeteries of London began in this period, and Père-Lachaise flourished that century, too. Perhaps the flourishing cities had the money and the aesthetic interest to build the monuments to the great citizens. I love visiting the older ones, too... no matter how modest, there is always some interest in looking at the headstones.
Mount Pleasant, in Toronto, began in 1825 under the name Potter's Field, but really took off when more land was purchased in 1872, and the new name of Mount Pleasant was given. Most of the most beautiful spots are taken now, of course (and the occupants aren't going anywhere soon), but I would say the tastes nowadays are for smaller, more modest gravestones as opposed to the grand Mausoleums. There are exceptions, however... this one is quite new:



When Potter's Field was closed to make way for the bigger Mount Pleasant Cemetery in the 1870's, the very charming little Toronto Necropolis was built, closer to downtown. Some very prominent early Torontonians rest there amongst the 50,000 buried. A Crematorium was added in 1933 in the marvellous little English Gothic Revival Chapel:








Here are some photos I entered in my photoblog some time back about a very modest local cemetery with a fascinating history. St. Michael's Cemetary, at St. Clair and Yonge. The earliest gravestone I found today was 1843. This cemetary became in demand shortly after during the great Potato Famine in Ireland, when many poor new Irish immigrants to Canada died of disease. So this cemetary was used for burying Irish Catholics:







Here is a newer gravestone, replacing an old one. Perhaps this young man died in the Fenian raids of the mid 1800's in Ontario:





The Winter Vaults, built in 1856. When the ground was frozen solid, bodies were interned here til Spring:







Marble statuary has not weathered as well in Toronto graveyards as it has in European ones, due to our harsher climates. Granite wears well, but marble has tended to erode:



Naturally, Celtic Crosses are a popular theme:























I loved this grave marker designed to look like logs....:



look at the wonderful shamrock details:



The oldest gravemarker that I saw was a Scot who died in 1843:











And finally, to show how spectacularly beautiful cemeteries look in winter, I made
this entry in my photoblog of St. Jame's Cemetery, another Victorian cemetery downtown here in Toronto:

I approach the St James Cemetery.. which looks incredibly beautiful in the snow.







this playful couple was throwing each other into snowbanks!



the view downtown from the cemetary:











this marker is going to topple over soon if they don't repair it!





Variations on La Pieta was a popular gravestone motif in the mid 1800's:







some great founding families of Toronto lie in this cemetary:







the graveyard extends waaaaay down into the adjoining ravine:





These ravines are a common sight through Toronto... this one plunges down to a roadway far below:



















We leave the cemetery with one last look at a monument!




Sometimes when a new Church was built, the old cemetery was built over, or re-used.
Here in the foyer of St Jame's Anglican Cathedral here in Toronto are some examples of our older gravestones:



Toronto was permanently settled by Europeans in 1793, so the oldest headstone I have been able to find so far is this one, of a member of the Rideout family (prominent in early Toronto history) from 1817:

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Last edited by Taller, Better; November 25th, 2008 at 09:07 PM.
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Old November 25th, 2008, 07:16 PM   #10
tpe
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I guess we can keep this going for a bit.

One of the most interesting cemeteries I had visited is the Chinese Cemetery in Manila.

In it, you see monuments that are virtually houses -- complete with sleep-in servants/caretakers and air-conditioning.

The architecture is of course always interesting. I would assume that such cemeteries are very common with the expatriate Chinese in Southeast Asia...

Pictures from flickr:

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Is this a tomb or a church?

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr
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Old November 25th, 2008, 07:54 PM   #11
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That is really fascinating!! I do hope people contribute some more photographs of interesting old cemeteries!
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Old November 25th, 2008, 08:15 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taller, Better View Post
That is really fascinating!! I do hope people contribute some more photographs of interesting old cemeteries!

Same here. I bet there are a lot of interesting cemeteries out there...

They don't have to be park-like, no? I think the varieties of cemeteries mirror the varieties of cities all over the world. They are cities in miniature.
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Old November 25th, 2008, 08:21 PM   #13
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Let's post all sorts of cemeteries from all sorts of cultures! They do not have to be monumental or park like. I do hope someone posts pictures of the lovely old cemeteries in Boston (Paul Revere, etc...). Somehow I seem to have lost my photos over the years. There was a very pretty cemetery beside Quebec City's first Protestant Church, with gravestones dating back to the 1700's, but I suppose I didn't take photos of it..

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Old November 25th, 2008, 08:40 PM   #14
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I've never seen a Chinese cemetary before. Thanks for sharing


When you want to visit Barcelona sometimes, you must see the cemetery of Poblenou or the cemetery of Montjuic. Fascinating density of graves! I was not allowed to take pictures in these graveyard, so i don't have selfmade pictures. But here some image from flickr and google anyway:

Cemetiri de Poblenou


Cemetiri de Montjuic
image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr




Most of these graves are for complete families.

Last edited by Ramses; November 25th, 2008 at 08:48 PM.
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Old November 25th, 2008, 08:45 PM   #15
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Tomb "apartments" are very common throughout the world. They are leased for a specified number of years, after which they have to be vacated, if the lease is allowed to expire. (Typically, any unclaimed bones are placed in the cemetery charnel house.) Others are actually owned, and not leased.

This one is from San Miguel de Allende, a town in Mexico with a huge expatriate/artistic community that I visited often.

image hosted on flickr
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Old November 25th, 2008, 08:52 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ramses View Post
I've never seen a Chinese cemetary before. Thanks for sharing


When you want to visit Barcelona sometimes, you must see the cemetery of Poblenou or the cemetery of Montjuic. Fascinating density of graves! I was not allowed to take pictures in these graveyard, so i don't have selfmade pictures. But here some image from flickr and google anyway:
[/img]
You're welcome. Frankly, it was a bit strange being there, because there were probably as many people living INSIDE that cemetery as there were dead people.

And I was unaware that you were about to post something like this when I posted the San Miguel picture. Thanks!
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Old November 25th, 2008, 10:38 PM   #17
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Symbolism

The Victorians raised funereal symbolism to a fine art. Below is a link explaining the meaning of various decorative elements of grave stones.

http://www.vintageviews.org/vv-tl/pa..._Symbolism.htm
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Old November 26th, 2008, 06:13 AM   #18
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Thanks for posting Graceland in Chicago. I live down the street from it Chicago and love it. It's worth a visit if you are visiting Chicago and have time.(Red Line to Sheridan)
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Old November 26th, 2008, 06:35 AM   #19
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Atlanta's Oakland Cemetery...founded in 1850

image hosted on flickr
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgiamberdine/2519057781/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/alevisohn/38455553/



image hosted on flickr
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toni-tr...7594161523311/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/toni-tr...7594161523311/



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http://www.flickr.com/photos/hueyatl/233568914/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/toni-tr...7594161523311/



Jewish Section
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/laurafries/16349685/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/laurafr...n/photostream/



6,000 Confederate Soldiers
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/toni-travels/164253914/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/toni-tr...7594161523311/



Many of the Confederate soldiers were unknown
image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2000923987/



Here lies Margaret Mitchell (Marsh), author of Gone with the Wind
image hosted on flickr
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/laurafries/16348632/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/352050776/



Bobby Jones, golf legend
image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/moosmom/313237820/



image hosted on flickr
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/taylorf...ect/416827912/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/6716521...n/photostream/



image hosted on flickr
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgiambe...n/photostream/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/k1ng/30...n/photostream/



image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/k1ng/3001805568/
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Old November 26th, 2008, 07:00 AM   #20
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God's Acre - Moravian Cemetery in Winston-Salem N.C. - founded in 1771. The Easter Sunrise Service is held in God's Acre each year, continuing the German tradition that began in Herrnhut in 1732.

By Moravian tradition, uniform headstones are used to symbolize equality...and so that no one person stands out among the stones. God's Acre sites throughout the world have separate sections for single men, single women, married men, married women, infants, and children.

image hosted on flickr
image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bshieldsnc/2622006058/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/airnos/121631997/


image hosted on flickr
image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/larrywfu/2276565375/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/ncbrian/897606305/


image hosted on flickr
image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/larrywfu/2277358232/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/airnos/122012127/
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