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Old July 25th, 2009, 12:51 AM   #261
ChrisZwolle
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I don't think that in 1996 life was really more difficult than today just because there were less transports.
Again, you're forgetting that there are more countries than Switzerland alone. Tens of millions of people faced significant welfare increase in central Europe.
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Old July 25th, 2009, 10:42 AM   #262
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I'm not surpirsed by the increase of transports, but I don't think it's all fundamental for our lives. Traffic at the Brenner Pass: 20.4-26.9-48.2 (again 1986-1996-2007).

It is true that traffic betweend Italy and Switzerland/Austria (and then Central Europe) increased more than between Italy and France (I still use this examples because they are the only ones I have found for each year from 1984 onwards). Ventimiglia+Fréjus+Mont Blanc: 28-46.3-49.1 (againe same years, the traffic has not increased much in 11 years).
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Old July 28th, 2009, 04:39 PM   #263
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Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
I'm not surpirsed by the increase of transports, but I don't think it's all fundamental for our lives.
There are very few things fundamental for our lives... Even cars can be seen as a luxury, since millions of people (even in europe) can easily live without it. Still we allow people to have it, despite of all the problems. Why?

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American and Japanese cars are different, and one might want visit the US one year and Europe the next.

I accept these transports, as they offer different products.
Both American and Japanese cars bring people from A to B. And going on holiday is a luxury in the first place. In the Netherlands this year about 3 million people stay in their own country during the holidays, and can still be very happy about that.

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What I like less are useless transport like Italian rubbish recycled or burnt in Germany, Swiss cream bottled in italy, or South African water sold in in Danemark.
Again: there just are people willing to pay for it. And who says water produced in South Africa tastes exactly the same? As an outsider you just can't judge about what people need, and what they don't need. If you want people to have less 'need', raise income taxes for high incomes. (I'm definately for that) But please don't tell people what to buy, and what not to buy (and so what has to be transported or not)...
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 06:17 PM   #264
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EU: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drivers%27_working_hours

USA: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hours_of_Service

The amount of driving hours between the two is staggering. A European driver can only drive 90 hours in 2 weeks, while an American driver can drive for almost 140 hours in 2 weeks. Considering the speed limits, an American trucker can drive twice the mileage of a European trucker.
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Old September 4th, 2009, 12:09 PM   #265
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Why do people have relationships with people that live hunderds/thousands of kms away, while there sure will be sweet guys/girls living on the corner?
Off topic but fun fact, there isn't one woman between 18-40 years old that's single in my town of 2200 people. We had some journalist here doing an article on it a while back. Therefore there are lots of single guys that need to travel 60-80kms just to find a woman to date.

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The amount of driving hours between the two is staggering. A European driver can only drive 90 hours in 2 weeks, while an American driver can drive for almost 140 hours in 2 weeks. Considering the speed limits, an American trucker can drive twice the mileage of a European trucker.
Something that happens here in the USA are husband/wife trucking teams. They travel together so that one rests while the other drives. Is there something analogous in Europe?
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Old September 4th, 2009, 12:19 PM   #266
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I don't think many truckers do that.

A problem is that European trucks have far less living space for the driver than American trucks. In Europe, the length is limited for the total combination, not only the trailer. That's also why most trucks are cab-overs.
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Old September 5th, 2009, 03:08 AM   #267
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I find it interesting that there are so many restrictions on trucking there when Europe is much more dependent on it than the US is thanks to the very large freight rail system in North America.
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Old September 5th, 2009, 11:28 AM   #268
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I find it interesting that there are so many restrictions on trucking there when Europe is much more dependent on it than the US is thanks to the very large freight rail system in North America.
That's a myth.

In tonnage kilometers;

US: road: 84% source: wikipedia
EU: road: 77% source: Eurostat

(only comparing road to rail, leaving out other modes)
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Old September 5th, 2009, 12:32 PM   #269
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Fast forward this one to 1 minute. Taken on I-80 in Wyoming I think.



Always a bunch of suckers who think they can drive 60 mph on a snow-covered road.
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Old September 5th, 2009, 03:25 PM   #270
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wow, that was cool...
where do you get the 60mph? (was it your estimation?)
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Old September 5th, 2009, 03:36 PM   #271
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That's just my guesstimate. He goes pretty fast.
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Old September 5th, 2009, 07:47 PM   #272
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I like these; Turnpike doubles.
image hosted on flickr


Triples are even longer:
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Old September 7th, 2009, 03:07 PM   #273
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Here's a knucklehead who thinks he can go down Donner Pass at 65 mph.

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Old September 8th, 2009, 02:39 AM   #274
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Fast forward this one to 1 minute. Taken on I-80 in Wyoming I think.



Always a bunch of suckers who think they can drive 60 mph on a snow-covered road.
What language do they speak?
Dutch? German?
What are they doing driving truck in US?
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Old September 8th, 2009, 06:11 AM   #275
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Excellent thread guys I am a truck driver from Australia with over 20 years heavy vehicle driving behind me and have to say I am surprised that most of your comments regarding the industry are correct and very perceptive. Trucking the world over is much the same you know move freight from point A to point B sounds simple eh ? but not always.

The total international freight task is growing at a staggering rate each year on average and the authorities are struggling to keep up with the demand. As there are many more trucks hitting the road each year there appears less rest areas due to them being mainly full. This is due to new enforcement techniques for drivers rest hours.

I confine myself to just driving Petrol and Lpg tankers around town or near country trips and won't do any more long distance work due to the increased surveilance/harrassment/policing of the industry. There are many experienced guys like me that have left the industry due to the new rules.

Long distance driving in Australia is a bit different to Europe in that the majority of freight runs are 800 - 1000 k's + per leg and are usually done on an overnight basis. We also have the long runs across the country and up into the north where I used to drive Road Trains. The average working day then was about 18-20 hrs now it's 12-14. Like the US most of the long distance drivers are payed by distance and not by the hour so it's all about making miles as they say.

I am going to Europe next month and will be doing 2 weeks of driving in France and Spain and will be looking forward to driving on some nice Euro roads and seeing different trucks from what I am used to here. Last time I had an interesting meal with some truckers in Innsbruck so this time am hoping to chat with some French or Spanish guys. I approach truckers all over the world and usually have no trouble engaging them once I establish I am a fellow driver. A Cuban guy in Florida thought I was spying on him when he saw my camera though

cheers
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Old September 8th, 2009, 12:13 PM   #276
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What language do they speak?
Dutch? German?
What are they doing driving truck in US?
Some kind of German, though I couldn't understand everything. In the end, he said "du scheisse jah" (you shit yeah), so I think it's German. There are more videos circulating on youtube with German truck drivers in the U.S. When it comes to truck driving, the U.S. is still the land of opportunities compared to over-regulated Europe.

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Originally Posted by SS Enforcer View Post
I am going to Europe next month and will be doing 2 weeks of driving in France and Spain and will be looking forward to driving on some nice Euro roads and seeing different trucks from what I am used to here. Last time I had an interesting meal with some truckers in Innsbruck so this time am hoping to chat with some French or Spanish guys.
That's nice. First of all, nearly all trucks in Europe are cab-overs with a total combination length of 16.5 meters. Only car carriers are somewhat longer, aroudn 18 meters. Some countries do have longer trucks, but they are not as common as regular trucks, except for like Sweden and Finland.

The problem is many truckers here in Europe do not speak much English, especially not from southern and central Europe. I was once trucking with a neighbor in Germany, and a UK trucker asked for road conditions ahead over the CB. A long time no response, until some German trucker answered something that looked a bit like English. :-S
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Old September 8th, 2009, 01:18 PM   #277
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Here's a knucklehead who thinks he can go down Donner Pass at 65 mph.
wow. that was even cooler than the previous one...

but why didnt he (driver of the cameracar) stop?

It was very dangerous to drive in the smoke, and he should have help to the crashed driver...
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Old September 8th, 2009, 09:01 PM   #278
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Originally Posted by geogregor View Post
What language do they speak?
Dutch? German?
What are they doing driving truck in US?
They speak german. The one guy says: "Look over there..."

After the truck has crashed the same guy says: "Did you record it?"

The others one says: "Yes of course!"

The first guy finishes with the sentence chris already translated.

It is kind of a southern german accent so it is not that easy to understand.
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Old September 8th, 2009, 11:06 PM   #279
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Excellent thread guys I am a truck driver from Australia with over 20 years heavy vehicle driving behind me and have to say I am surprised that most of your comments regarding the industry are correct and very perceptive.
Nice to have another trucker here. You said you've driven the real big stuff, maybe you can show us some pics?

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The total international freight task is growing at a staggering rate each year on average and the authorities are struggling to keep up with the demand. As there are many more trucks hitting the road each year there appears less rest areas due to them being mainly full. This is due to new enforcement techniques for drivers rest hours.
Same problem here. It's quite difficult to find a parking spot at rest areas on major truck routes, though they say it's become less of a problem since the crisis.

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The average working day then was about 18-20 hrs now it's 12-14. Like the US most of the long distance drivers are payed by distance and not by the hour so it's all about making miles as they say.
Paying truckers by distance is forbidden here. I think paying by mileage encourages people to drive unsafe speeds, doesn't it?

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I am going to Europe next month and will be doing 2 weeks of driving in France and Spain and will be looking forward to driving on some nice Euro roads and seeing different trucks from what I am used to here.
Have fun! Maybe this can be a preview of what some european trucks can look like.
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Old September 9th, 2009, 10:05 PM   #280
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Another nice set of Doubles. These trucks pull 2 48 foot trailers, so the total length is around 35 m or 115 ft.

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