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Old May 28th, 2014, 06:43 PM   #381
MarcVD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaeguDuke View Post
The Shikansen lines as well as the Korean KTX lines share track close to cities, I'm not sure how well the wireless power would work if an overhead line was still required for other trains
In Korea I don't know, but in Japan, shinkansen and other trains do not have
the same track gauge, so they obviously don't share tracks.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 07:07 PM   #382
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Why hasn't Japan tried to implement this? I was under the impression that JR was under pressure to reduce noise, and wire/catenary contact was one of the main culprits...
There will always be a trade off with new technology.
Energy efficiency for wire/catenary contact has 93%+ energy efficiency rate. Down side is noise pollution and wear and tear.
Although the technology may sound promising but at present 83% efficiency rate, I believe power loss & initial cost out weighs potential benefits.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 08:50 PM   #383
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Well, as ruready1000 said, they're hoping to improve the efficiency before actually implementing the system, and I think it'll be a worthwhile upgrade for the Korean HSR system if they decide to spread it throughout the whole network.

And why does the Japanese maglev system have to be more impressive? I'd say they're equally impressive, although wireless electricity transmission is a much more revolutionary technology (generally speaking). Let's not do a Korea v. Japan thing; both countries are inarguably very advanced in the field of high speed rail systems.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 10:38 PM   #384
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aquaticko View Post
Well, as ruready1000 said, they're hoping to improve the efficiency before actually implementing the system, and I think it'll be a worthwhile upgrade for the Korean HSR system if they decide to spread it throughout the whole network.

And why does the Japanese maglev system have to be more impressive? I'd say they're equally impressive, although wireless electricity transmission is a much more revolutionary technology (generally speaking). Let's not do a Korea v. Japan thing; both countries are inarguably very advanced in the field of high speed rail systems.
Why maglev is more interesting? I don't even know where to start. Speed comes to mind first Also the fact that it is way less conventional, and yes, futuristic. Also, Japan is unique in that it is the only country doing it in large scale. But this all is IMHO of course.

PS. It never was my intention to start Korea vs Japan, because I'm from a country far far away from East Asia and have absolutely no connection to it
I agree that there is no need to compare these too. Mainly because I think Japan is on whole different level(when it comes to rail technology, doubly so), and this is not IMHO
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Old May 29th, 2014, 04:08 AM   #385
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Maglevs are more impressive because they fly using magnets as if by magic... :-p

Hopefully they've worked out the kinks over the last couple kinks since the Shanghai maglev but Japan already has a maglev subway line right? Probably another thread for that tho..
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Old May 29th, 2014, 09:16 AM   #386
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Originally Posted by DaeguDuke View Post
Maglevs are more impressive because they fly using magnets as if by magic... :-p
They use magic wand
Back to the topic. Has Korea exported any HSR ? I know Rotem has built EMU and metro rolling stock for many countries, but I can't find anything about KTX.
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Old May 29th, 2014, 02:42 PM   #387
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I think they have an agreement with Turkey to produce high-speed trainsets, though it's not clear if they'll be KTX trains or a new design developed for or with TUVASAS. They're also considered to be a front runner for the Brazilian HSR project, but who knows when/if that'll ever happen.

I was probably being generous in saying Korean HSR is technologically on par with Japan's, but as the Koreans tend to do, they're moving quickly, and for every route in the world that couldn't or wouldn't spend money on new maglev infrastructure, wireless HSR seems as though it'll be a more important advance (and wireless electricity transmission in general is still pretty futuristic, you have to admit).
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Old May 29th, 2014, 06:48 PM   #388
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Agree, Brazilian HSR will take a long time. Rotem might even land it, although they should really stop screwing up. The way Rotem failed in Ukraine and then in USA certainly won't help their chances, especially when the competition is known for safety and reliability.
As for maglev, I think the probability of it being adopted right now is very slim. After Japan builds its line it might, and probably will, change. Also doesn't help that technology is scarce. Even China scraped the work on maglev.
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Old May 29th, 2014, 06:59 PM   #389
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That's what I'm saying. Maglev is an entirely different kind of high speed transit system, impressive in its own right but totally separate from on-rail high-speed trains.

Wireless electricity transmission for traditional HSR is applicable in many more places because it's a modification of currently-existent infrastructure, and represents a very useful potential improvement over pantograph and overhead wires in terms of aerodynamics, friction, construction costs, and maintenance.
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Old June 23rd, 2014, 06:54 AM   #390
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KTX to start passenger service to Incheon Airport

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SEOUL, June 16 (Yonhap) -- South Korea's bullet train will begin service to the country's main international airport starting June 30, which is expected to improve convenience for travelers, the state-run rail operator said Monday.

Korea Railroad Corp. (KORAIL) said Korea Train Express (KTX) will go to Incheon International Airport 20 times a day.

People who get on the high-speed trains that serve the airport from provincial cities will no longer have to get off at Seoul or Yongsan stations to transfer to the Airport Railroad Express (AREX) or get on limousine airport buses.

"All they have to do is stay on their KTX that will take them directly to the airport," a KORAIL official said. This can greatly improve convenience for passengers.

The railroad operator said that its maximum speed will be restricted, because the KTX will be using the same railroad track as the slower AREX trains.

It said the KTX will take about an hour to reach the airport from Seoul or Yongsan stations, similar to conventional AREX trains. The company said test runs of the KTX on the route have been going on in earnest since late May.

The high-speed trains will augment the existing trains linking Seoul and the port city of Incheon, the country's main air transport hub.

KORAIL said the KTX will stop once at Geomam Station to pick up passengers from Incheon.

The fare for a person using the KTX from Seoul Station to the airport is 12,500 won (US$12.20), while the fee for trains coming from Yongsan Station is 12,800 won.



A KTX train at Geomam Station on the railroad linking Seoul with Incheon International Airport. (Yonhap file photo)


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(END)



KTX Schedule (from or to Incheon Airport)
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Old July 2nd, 2014, 10:57 PM   #391
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Source: http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20140630001212

General departure info here:
http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/...sp?cid=1930476
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Old August 21st, 2014, 02:50 AM   #392
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Underwater KTX Tunnel to Link Jeju to Mainland

An underwater tunnel is to create a high-speed rail link connecting the southern resort island of Jeju with the mainland. If the tunnel becomes a reality, it would take just two hours and 40 minutes to get from Seoul to Jeju by KTX.

A POSCO Engineering and Construction spokesman said Tuesday, "We reviewed the construction plan for the rail link and concluded that it is feasible." The builder plans to form a special team to oversee the project and has notified the government.

The rail link would involve building a 171 km railroad from Mokpo, South Jeolla Province to Jeju. Part of it would be built on a bridge and the remaining 85 km underwater.

The government conducted a feasibility study on the underwater tunnel in 2010 but put it on the back burner due to cost concerns.

But a construction industry insider said, "Since 2010 Jeju has seen a 10-percent rise in the number of tourists each year, surpassing 10 million in 2013. There is ample demand so there shouldn't be any problems in terms of financing."

A government official said, "We're looking into including the underwater tunnel in our master plan for railway infrastructure to be finalized at the end of this year."


Granted, the sources cited are "a construction industry insider" and "a government official", but it just makes so much sense, what with Seoul-Jeju being one of the world's busiest flights corridors, and Korea's highly-developed construction industry.

I guess we'll have to wait until the end of the year, but I have my fingers crossed.
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Old August 21st, 2014, 07:51 AM   #393
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If they can do that, then they can also build a tunnel to Japan via Tsushima and Iki :o
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Old August 21st, 2014, 09:26 AM   #394
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Keep Calm, it's a korean plan
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Old August 22nd, 2014, 03:08 AM   #395
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Well a tunnel to Japan would be much, much longer, never mind the political issues with physically linking Korea and Japan. If that tunnel is ever built, and I agree it should be, it probably won't happen until the latter half of this century.

As for it being a Korean plan, what's wrong with that? I don't know if you realize, but the South has historically followed through on rail development plans, and there are tons of incentives for them to on this one. It's also not the first time a rail link to Jeju has been discussed before, which suggests to me it's likely it'll happen. There's no real reason to doubt this project; we just have to wait and see if it's actually going to happen.
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Old August 22nd, 2014, 06:51 AM   #396
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Why did Korea choose to go for low platforms? "When" the country is finally connected to China and Japan, I'd imagine there'd be integration issues.
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Old August 22nd, 2014, 07:08 AM   #397
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aquaticko View Post
Well a tunnel to Japan would be much, much longer, never mind the political issues with physically linking Korea and Japan. If that tunnel is ever built, and I agree it should be, it probably won't happen until the latter half of this century.

As for it being a Korean plan, what's wrong with that? I don't know if you realize, but the South has historically followed through on rail development plans, and there are tons of incentives for them to on this one. It's also not the first time a rail link to Jeju has been discussed before, which suggests to me it's likely it'll happen. There's no real reason to doubt this project; we just have to wait and see if it's actually going to happen.

Yup, its still far too expensive. Technology evolves though, it may become cheaper later.
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Old August 22nd, 2014, 12:25 PM   #398
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Originally Posted by ddes View Post
Why did Korea choose to go for low platforms? "When" the country is finally connected to China and Japan, I'd imagine there'd be integration issues.
Because Korea uses (wrongly) French technology


@ aquaticko: I'm kidding, my reaction is because the anti-development movement established in Seoul (i.e. skyscrapers projects) and because Korean government or Korean mass media or simply, Korean rail fans can't transmit or share the Korean railway projects.

Is simply: I lived for one year in Busan and I have the interest in the modernization of the Donghae-Nambu Line but it's really difficult for foreigners to find information about the project.

BTW I think the double track between Bujeon and Gijang will be finished by the end of this FY (or partially).
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Old August 23rd, 2014, 01:50 AM   #399
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Oh, I see. Yeah, I understand that feeling too. Looking for official information on the HEMU-430x and ITX-Saemaul, and the Gyeongjeon line and metropolitan rail projects, is challenging.

Quote:
Yup, its still far too expensive. Technology evolves though, it may become cheaper later.
Normally I'd agree, but for a couple of reasons:

1. The Korean government has been looking at stimulus packages to get the economy moving again,
2. The government knows that Jeju is one of South Korea's major tourist areas, so rerouting some of that traffic through Seoul and the rest of the peninsula is obviously hugely appealing, and
3. One of Korea's foremost industries is construction, and both those companies and the country itself love big, impressive, brand-building things, which this most certainly would be one of.

In any case, we obviously just have to wait to see what happens in the coming months as to whether or not the tunnel will be built in the near future.

Last edited by aquaticko; August 27th, 2014 at 01:11 PM.
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Old August 27th, 2014, 12:46 PM   #400
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Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
If they can do that, then they can also build a tunnel to Japan via Tsushima and Iki :o
It was officially rejected by Korea due to economic reasons. Then again, idealistic organizations like the Unification Church(Moonies) is hell-bent on building it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ddes View Post
Why did Korea choose to go for low platforms? "When" the country is finally connected to China and Japan, I'd imagine there'd be integration issues.
Well, in an official capacity, there's the "Eurasia Initiative", which is a plan to connect South Korean rail to the Trans-Siberian Railway. It's more of a political issue now, considering worsening ties with North Korea and Russia.

Last edited by cydevil; August 27th, 2014 at 12:55 PM.
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