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Old December 25th, 2010, 09:39 PM   #461
Grisent
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So, another heavier snowstorm today. The Road Administration is keeping an updated list of tertiary roads that are currently impassable or in very bad condition. Particularly, roads of Jõelähtme and Kuusalu communes are again on the list.

One of the roads marked as "passable with difficulties" is Kostivere-Raasiku road - the one where 18 people (and a snowplough!) got stranded during the last snowstorm and which had to be closed to traffic and evacuated with special equipment. Seems to be a particularly blizzard-prone stretch of road.

A very good blizzard protection measure is roadside hedges. In the long term, Kostivere-Raasiku road (and probably several others) would need hedges, too. However, I wonder how could that be arranged? On smaller roads, immediate roadside land is probably owned privately, not by state.
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Old December 25th, 2010, 10:00 PM   #462
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Hedges are, in fact, an old but still the best method to avoid the accumulation of snow on the road by wind. I think that new hedges should be planted on the open stretches of road to prevent this.

I have a few photos of E263 / T2 / Tallinn-Tartu highway from 24-12-2010:

The following photos are taken between Kose and Mäo.








You can see a hedge on both sides of the road which is quite common in Estonia. These were planted to prevent the wind from blowing snow on to the road - very useful IMO. Somehow these haven't been used in the last few decades.






An unusually long row of cars.


Mäo bypass (2x2 lanes) on the following photos:








Back on the normal road.




Getting dark...(at ~ PM 3.15)


I rode the same road today (25-12-2010) by bus and the conditions were a lot worse. It had snowed all night so the road was pretty much covered with snow,

Last edited by Rebasepoiss; December 26th, 2010 at 01:10 AM.
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Old December 26th, 2010, 01:20 AM   #463
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beautiful
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Old December 26th, 2010, 02:13 PM   #464
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I don't think hedges have been forgotten in coping with snowdrift. I drove on E20 some days ago and remember seeing a row of spruce saplings which would become a hedge in some years (right here).
E20 itself near Jõelähtme and Kostivere had very good protection against snowdrift. There are hedges on the northern side of the road and all the gaps were protected with temporary snow fences (such as this one). The area around there is probably one of the most snowdrift prone areas in Estonia - wide unobstructed fields open to the strong winds coming north from the sea. E20 in Virumaa between Viru-Nigula and Purtse, where several hundred people got stuck in the previous snowstorm, has the some problems - the road runs close to the sea (at one point 500 m from sea, but more than 50 m above sea level) and again, there are mostly open fields between the sea and the highway, so nothing stops the wind.
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 03:17 PM   #465
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Traffic death toll at record low

78 people lost their life in traffic accidents in Estonia last year which is 22 people less than in 2009 and the lowest for the last 65 years, writes aripaev.ee

This is well ahead of the national goal to achieve less than 100 traffic fatalities by 2015.

According to the national road administration, 100 people were killed in traffic in 2009 and 132 people in 2008.

Also the number of people injured in traffic accidents is the lowest for the last decade.

The total number of traffic accidents was 1,549, down from 2,204 traffic accidents in 2008.

The darkest month in traffic in 2010 was in July when 12 people died.

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Old January 3rd, 2011, 09:02 PM   #466
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AFAIK, counting road deaths per 1 million people, this result is around the same level as Finland.
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 09:21 PM   #467
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Estonia may be the first post-communist country to achieve the same road safety level as most west European countries.
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 09:42 PM   #468
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good day collegues

1. what is the highest fine you can get in Estonia ?

2. what is the fine ticket for the following traffic offence: you do 155 km/h on the road where 100 km/h is allowed ?
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 11:17 PM   #469
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Quote:
Originally Posted by and802 View Post
good day collegues

1. what is the highest fine you can get in Estonia ?
For drunk driving, up to € 1200

Quote:
Originally Posted by and802 View Post
2. what is the fine ticket for the following traffic offence: you do 155 km/h on the road where 100 km/h is allowed ?
Up to € 800 but you could also be sentenced to imprisonment or you could lose your driving license for up to a year. However, at 155 km/h a fine is the most likely one.
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 11:37 PM   #470
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If it was 155 on your gauge, it will probably be 145 with offset of your speedometer and correction of the measuring device. So that would be 45 above the limit.

I had the following situation which are pretty different circumstances, but still:

I was joining Tartu Maantee in the direction of Tartu coming from road 11 ("ringroad" of Tallinn) and didn't notice any signs but assumed the speed limit was 110 (2 * 2 road outside city limits) while in fact it was 90.

100m before the first 110 sign I saw some "high-visibility" jackets waving their arm and indeed they had radared me. I drove 120 on the speedometer and 111 on the radar. With correction it became 107 (+17kph) and after a long talk with the police officer I got away with a 300 krones (€19) fine...

Other situation: In August my friends helped me move here and drove the van back to Belgium. Right after the border with Latvia on the A3 they were stopped by police that caught them driving 122 on a 90kph road. They got off with a warning...


But you probably got a letter home with an invitation to have appeal or something. In that case the standard tarrifs will be in place which would probably mean a fine of a few hundred euros.
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 11:40 PM   #471
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wow,

I spent two years in Eesti Vabariik in nineties, and that time fines were "slightly" different. 800 euro is even worse than in Slovakia !
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 11:51 PM   #472
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Quote:
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wow,

I spent two years in Eesti Vabariik in nineties, and that time fines were "slightly" different. 800 euro is even worse than in Slovakia !
Well, we have 3 different "categories" for speeding:

1-20 km/h over the limit: up to € 120.
21-40 km/h over the limit: up to € 400 or driving license taken away for up to 6 months.
41-... km/h over the limit: up to € 800 or driving license taken away for up to 6 months or imprisonment.

An example: at the beginning of November, a Swedish citizen drove 182 km/h in a 90 km/h zone. He was kept under arrest for 2 days until the court. The court decided that the 2-day imprisonment was a suitable punishment all alone.
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Old January 4th, 2011, 09:22 AM   #473
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Welcome to the Eurozone Estonia!
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Old January 9th, 2011, 07:29 PM   #474
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkk View Post
Traffic death toll at record low

78 people lost their life in traffic accidents in Estonia last year which is 22 people less than in 2009 and the lowest for the last 65 years, writes aripaev.ee

This is well ahead of the national goal to achieve less than 100 traffic fatalities by 2015.

According to the national road administration, 100 people were killed in traffic in 2009 and 132 people in 2008.
Same for Lithuania. Last year we have managed to achieve the lowest number of people dead because of car accidents since 1960! 300 people have died in total. That is 19% less than in the 2009. The highest number was in 1991, 1173 died then.

I just don't understand, how so many people died back in those times when there were far less cars on our roads
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Old January 9th, 2011, 08:42 PM   #475
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Almost non-existent traffic law enforcement, worse road infrastructure, less safe cars (no seat belts, air bags), less knowledge of safe driving and the dangers which road traffic delivers etc.
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Old January 9th, 2011, 08:51 PM   #476
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It must have been freakin dangerous to drive back in those days. I mean what was the number of cars per 1000 inhabitants? I would guess no more than 50? Maybe less? Today it's around 500-600 and especially in Lithuania many cars are second-hand old ones from Germany, Netherlands etc. which means they are far from being very safe either. Roads are much more crowded and yet we have less accidents then in the 1960 in absolute numbers. That is just hard to believe!
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Old January 9th, 2011, 08:52 PM   #477
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Welcome to the Eurozone Estonia!
yes, estonia have borded the Titanic of CURR€NCY. Soon the €uro will hit the Iceberg when Romania and Bulgaria also join. I'm glad Sweden still have their "krona"
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Old January 9th, 2011, 08:57 PM   #478
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Nearly all countries had their unsafest roads in the 1950's. That was the first big boom of automobile traffic in Europe, leading to many unexperienced drivers in extremely unsafe cars on the roads. China has the same problem now.
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Old January 9th, 2011, 09:53 PM   #479
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebasepoiss View Post
AFAIK, counting road deaths per 1 million people, this result is around the same level as Finland.
In Finland 12 deaths per million.
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Old January 9th, 2011, 09:58 PM   #480
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No way, Finland had 270 traffic fatalities in 2010. That translates to 50 deaths per million. The safest countries in Europe achieve around 36 - 40 deaths per million. Anything over 75 is above average. Lithuania for example has 91 deaths, similar to Belgium and (one of) the worst in Europe. Though I must add Lithuania was over 120 deaths only 1 or 2 years ago, so things are improving drastically. The only established wealthy country with high traffic volumes for years that has not been able to significantly slash traffic fatalities is Belgium.
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