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Old April 4th, 2014, 03:14 PM   #1121
romanzone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebasepoiss View Post
2014 map of largest roadworks: http://www.mnt.ee/public/2014_objektid_a3.pdf
Perhaps the most significant roadworks are:
  • T2: Tartu Western bypass (previous stage was Postimaja interchange, now they are moving further South, with few kms of dual carriageway and grade-separated crossing);
  • T11/Tallinn bypass: Kurna interchange and Kurna-Luige stretch, also dual carriageway;
  • T1: new bridges across Pirita river;
  • T4: Topi interchange
Aruvalla-Kose (T2) is marked as U/C on the map, although it was opened in November (they need to finish some works...). Long sections of T1 are also marked, there will be repaving of westbound carriageway or finishing of previous projects.
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Old April 8th, 2014, 09:17 PM   #1122
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Spring has finally arrived, at least according to speed limits Starting from Thursday, the speed limit on dual carriageways will be raised to 110km/h for the summer period. When counting each side of the carriageway separately, this amounts to 220.5 km

Unfortunately, as was the case for the past 2 years, all other highways will keep their 90km/h speed limit also for the summer period. Up until 2011 the speed limit was raised to 100km/h on certain sections of single carriageways as well (658 km in 2011).
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Old April 8th, 2014, 11:48 PM   #1123
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Damn it, Estonians! Why are you so quick at that!?
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Old April 10th, 2014, 04:50 PM   #1124
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Damn it, Estonians! Why are you so quick at that!?
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Old April 11th, 2014, 06:29 PM   #1125
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Who's slow now...

I'm actually surprised that they raised the speed limits so early, especially because temperatures still drop below zero at night. There have been more talks about installing electronic speed limits on dual carriageways. This way they could adjust the speed limits according to real-time weather. I'm also hoping that they will raise the speed limit on dual carriageways to 120km/h, at least on the newer sections with higher standards. That's less likely, though.

Last edited by Rebasepoiss; April 11th, 2014 at 06:35 PM.
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Old April 28th, 2014, 10:06 PM   #1126
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The Estonian Police has set guidelines to homogenize fines for different traffic violations. Until now, this has been up to the police officer to decide (within certain limits). If you ask me, these guidelines are not bad per se but the recommended fines are way too high. Just some examples:

Speeding:
  • 1–5 km/h € 40–48
  • 6–10 km/h € 52–60
  • 11–15 km/h € 64–80
  • 16–20 km/h € 84–96
  • 21–25 km/h € 100–120
  • 26–30 km/h € 124–192
  • 31–35 km/h € 196–260
  • 36–40 km/h € 264–332
DUI:
  • 0,10–0,12 mg/l € 180–200
  • 0,13–0,15 mg/l € 220–260
  • 0,16–0,18 mg/l € 280 –300
  • 0,19–0,21 mg/l € 320–340
  • 0,22–0,24 mg/l € 360–380
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Old April 28th, 2014, 10:09 PM   #1127
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That's more expensive than the Netherlands (up to 20 km/h over the limit).
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Old April 28th, 2014, 10:40 PM   #1128
John Maynard
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
That's more expensive than the Netherlands (up to 20 km/h over the limit).
What's more, that's definitely much more expensive than in Poland .

Highest speeding fine in PL; over 50 km/h of the limit (no limit!): 400-500 PLN (95 to 120 EUR) .
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Old April 29th, 2014, 01:03 PM   #1129
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Hmm a couple of years ago I was doing 112 where 90 was allowed (dual carriageway 100m before the sign showing "110" as limit) and the officer gave me a 20 euros fine. Seems like those days are over :d.
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Old May 9th, 2014, 04:33 PM   #1130
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Last night, a lorry drove off a bridge on T1/E20 on the 109th km point. The bridge was being renovated at the time which meant that half of the road deck had been disassembled. The area was lit and there were roadwork signs and lowered speed limits. The lorry driver died in the crash.
Photos: http://www.autonet.ee/uudised/pildid/62281/106299



The bridge itself was also considerably damaged which means it will be closed for at least 3 months. Drivers on the E20 will have to use significant detours:
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Old May 9th, 2014, 05:41 PM   #1131
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The lorry driver died in the crash.
I hope the stupid lorry driver did not defecate in our gene pool before he died.
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Old May 9th, 2014, 06:41 PM   #1132
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Kinda reminds the film "Speed". But this driver didn't make it across the unbuilt bridge.
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Old May 10th, 2014, 02:19 AM   #1133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebasepoiss View Post
The Estonian Police has set guidelines to homogenize fines for different traffic violations. Until now, this has been up to the police officer to decide (within certain limits). If you ask me, these guidelines are not bad per se but the recommended fines are way too high. Just some examples:

Speeding:
  • 1–5 km/h € 40–48
  • 6–10 km/h € 52–60
  • 11–15 km/h € 64–80
  • 16–20 km/h € 84–96
WTF is this shit? :

So if speed limit is 120 km/h...........then you go 121 km/h, you already get a fine?!?!? Just for 1 km/h difference?

Again, I'm not against speed limits and I understand the need for such............but these speed limit tolerances are way too tight.

Just for single digit speed difference?

I guess this is no different from our local Philippine traffic enforcer that apprehended a motorist for going at 102 km/h (max speed limit is 100 km/h)

Point is: This is dumbfounding and unreasonable...

Last edited by Blackraven; May 10th, 2014 at 02:41 AM.
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Old May 10th, 2014, 10:03 AM   #1134
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There's a margin of a few kmph + the deviation of your speedometer, so when on your speedometer you are doing 130, in reality you are probably driving 123-124 and take off the police's fault margin and you are driving 120.

Because many drivers know this is well, I have the feeling everyone in Estonia drives 10kph over the limit on their speedometer (and in other countries as well).
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Old May 10th, 2014, 04:44 PM   #1135
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Police speed guns usually have an official measuring uncertainty of +/- 3km/h. This means that when you're driving 93km/h in a 90km/h zone, the uncertainty of 3km/h will be subtracted from that so the police can't actually fine you.

But I agree, fining for anything less than 5km/h over the limit is stupid and I really doubt the police actually bothers to do that. IMO, anything less than 10km/h over the limit for a first time offender should result in a warning.
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Old May 10th, 2014, 09:58 PM   #1136
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebasepoiss View Post
Police speed guns usually have an official measuring uncertainty of +/- 3km/h. This means that when you're driving 93km/h in a 90km/h zone, the uncertainty of 3km/h will be subtracted from that so the police can't actually fine you.

But I agree, fining for anything less than 5km/h over the limit is stupid and I really doubt the police actually bothers to do that. IMO, anything less than 10km/h over the limit for a first time offender should result in a warning.
And that's the reason why everyone drives peacefully at 110 in a 90 zone according to the cars speedometer
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Old May 10th, 2014, 10:12 PM   #1137
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Maybe 10 years ago but nowadays it's not that common.

If you drove 90km/h according to your speedometer, buses and lorries would overtake you.

Besides, speed cameras start fining at 93km/h but if you add the measurement uncertainty of +/- 4km/h, this rises to 97km/h. The fine for every km/h over the limit is €3 which is way less than the new police guidelines.

I've driven (as a passenger) in several different European countries and I'd say that Estonia is among those where drivers stick to the speed limit the most. Our fatality rate is still at or above average so speed isn't as big of a factor as the authorities claim it is. It's just a very easy thing to check and cash in on.
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Old May 10th, 2014, 10:14 PM   #1138
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The Estonian traffic safety is better than your neighbors to the south, the fatality rate is near EU average and approximately 25% lower than in LV and LT.
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Old May 10th, 2014, 10:38 PM   #1139
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Anyway, back to roads...and bad news.

The government (which came into power rather recently) has decided to cut down on road expenditure by €25 million or roughly 10% of the current road budget.

Estonian Road Administration claims that this will have significant consequences for the long-term state of our road network. The need for yearly repairs currently stands at 2,200km. This would enable to maintain a 7-year repair cycle for the 16,500 km of state owned roads. Last year the Road Administration managed to do works on 1,819km of roads but with the budget cut now coming, this will drop down once again to a lower level.

If this under-expenditure continues, it might be necessary to decrease road standards in the future when it comes to snow clearance or surfacing of gravel roads, for example.

EU funds are also a concern. The more EU funds the government decides to use on our roads, the less money there is for repairs and maintenance on smaller roads since EU funds can't be used there. EU funds are only applicable to 1,245 km or 7.5% of our road network.
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Old May 10th, 2014, 10:45 PM   #1140
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Chris, you don't even need to look at the safety statistics to guess that - Estonia has good roads with drivers that obey the speed limits. Meanwhile in Latvia we have drivers doing 100-110 on such roads with most safety barriers safely rusting away.
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