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Old June 12th, 2011, 09:22 PM   #1401
Otie
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The floor plate is constantly changing, the higher, the smaller:



Any clue of the panel's dimensions? The only thing I know is that on 57th side the tower's lenght is 159' (~48.46m) (from street level); and that renders show there's 35 pieces of cladding. If we divide 159/35 we get ~4.54' (~1.38m). But then I thought a tower designed in imperial system wouldn't be designed in such measuerements, so I gave up guessing each window pane would measure 4' 6" (~1.37m). But then I tried to place the same number of panes as shown on the renders both east and west sides, and gave me different lenghts that weren't on the floor print.
Are the east and west panes different (dimensions) from the north/south panes?
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Old June 12th, 2011, 10:30 PM   #1402
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Today, June 12th, Dan Burnett..











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Old June 12th, 2011, 10:35 PM   #1403
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@oties: Nice job! I understand the project much better now!

Thanks for the update DinoVabec
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Old June 12th, 2011, 10:52 PM   #1404
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Otie is doin' an amazing job here..Those panels are even more complicated than the whole building..

As for the building, I don't know what they are waiting with next floors..They haven't moved up for a while now..
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Old June 13th, 2011, 12:23 AM   #1405
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Maybe concrete shortage or so? I heard that's comon in the NYC area?
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Old June 13th, 2011, 01:28 AM   #1406
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The price they pay for choosing concrete instead of steel: columns everywhere!



Although this is a thread about construction updates and not a place where to post people's models, I think there's not enough renders to understand the building itself, so I'll post only interesting stuff that may help understand better One57.

Great updates, btw!
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Old June 13th, 2011, 04:32 AM   #1407
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Otie, nobody cares about the rules, we love your renders!

That last one is amazing, it really gives me a great perspective. I still can't believe One57 doesn't have a core!

Anyway, thanks for your work and keep it up!
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Old June 13th, 2011, 11:11 AM   #1408
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Quote:
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"Moreover, the overwhelming majority of apartments in NYC are rent-regulated with caps imposed by the government. "

This is bit misleading. There aren't "caps" in terms of limiting how high rents can go. What is regulated is how much, percentage wise, they can be increased each year. Those increases have been consistently higher than inflation, so the cost of rents here in NYC has been going up. Moreover, when a new tenant comes to an apartment the landlord can increase the rent by a fairly large amount - 10 to 15% I think. Given that there is significant turnover many/most apartments rent at market rates which in NYC is quite high. Rent control, what did cap rents, is only for units that have been continuously occupied since 1972 or before which is almost none at this point.

Finally, all "luxury" rentals, anything above $2,500 per month have no regulations or controls at all.

Indeed many people do go all the way to Pennsylvannia to live and commute to New York. The Poconos area is particularly popular although I also know people who commute from Philadelphia.
http://therealdeal.com/newyork/artic...-dinapoli-says

Nearly two-thirds of NYC apartments still rent-regulated or subsidized, report saysJune 09, 2011 10:00AM

Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli As next week's expiration of the state's rent regulation laws approaches, a new state-sponsored report has revealed that nearly two-thirds of New York City's 2 million rental apartments still enjoy regulated rental rates. According to the Post, the report, by Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, found 1.4 million rental apartments to be either rent-stabilized, publicly-owned or taxpayer-subsidized -- and that's after the roughly 10,000 units that have been deregulated over the course of the last decade.

The impending June 15 deadline for rent regulation to be renewed is threatening some 1 million New York City apartments as lawmakers, tenant advocates and landlords try to hammer out an agreement on income and monthly rent thresholds for decontrol.

Sources said a meeting between Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos last Friday brought no resolution to the debate, though landlords are said to be willing to raise decontrol thresholds if their right to deregulate apartments once they become vacant remains intact.

DiNapoli, a democrat, said in his report that median rents rose 7.2 percent across the city in 2009 to $980 per month, with 44 percent of rental households spending one-third of their income on rent. Including utilities, more than half of rental households spent a third of their income on living expenses, the report says. [Post]
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Old June 13th, 2011, 03:53 PM   #1409
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Not sure what your point is. That rent regulations still technically apply to most apartments in NYC? No kidding.

But rents have increased so much through turnover and rent increases exceeding inflation that, as I said, many/most are now renting at market rates. Mine is, which is why they don't even bother increasing it as much as the rent regulations technically allow.

You can actually see this by looking at the last sentence - an increase of 7.2% is way more than inflation and is also more than rent regulations allow in continiously occupied units. That number obviously results from turnover of tenants and apartments that are decontrolled due to them being "luxury rentals". Increases at those rates that are way above inflation is precisely what has led to many/most units being at market rates.
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Old June 14th, 2011, 12:25 AM   #1410
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I don't want to imagine all the work I have to do when I get to the first floors...

First attempt with the glass:

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Old June 14th, 2011, 09:12 AM   #1411
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Just out of curiosity, why would one choose concrete over steel for a project of this magnitude?
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Old June 14th, 2011, 09:42 AM   #1412
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rigatoni View Post
Just out of curiosity, why would one choose concrete over steel for a project of this magnitude?
To reduce sway. Most office buildings use steel because it is cheaper, then simply use a dampener to reduce sway, but residential buildings have to have absolute minimal sway due to the fact that people actually live there, thus they use concrete which is more sturdy than simple steel.
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Old June 14th, 2011, 09:19 PM   #1413
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To reduce sway. Most office buildings use steel because it is cheaper, then simply use a dampener to reduce sway, but residential buildings have to have absolute minimal sway due to the fact that people actually live there, thus they use concrete which is more sturdy than simple steel.
Correct me if I'm wrong but don't you mean rigid/stiff as opposed to sturdy.
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Old June 15th, 2011, 12:10 AM   #1414
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rigatoni View Post
Just out of curiosity, why would one choose concrete over steel for a project of this magnitude?
Also, concrete is much better at sound proofing in comparison to steel. In the UK, concrete is mandatory (or at least strongly encouraged) for residential highrises.
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Old June 15th, 2011, 03:42 AM   #1415
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
To reduce sway. Most office buildings use steel because it is cheaper, then simply use a dampener to reduce sway, but residential buildings have to have absolute minimal sway due to the fact that people actually live there, thus they use concrete which is more sturdy than simple steel.
Quote:
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Also, concrete is much better at sound proofing in comparison to steel. In the UK, concrete is mandatory (or at least strongly encouraged) for residential highrises.
Is it as strong as steel?

It boggles my mind how this thing is all concrete. It just doesn't strike me as being safe, but then again it's allowed so it must be safe.
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Old June 15th, 2011, 05:57 AM   #1416
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Quote:
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Is it as strong as steel?

It boggles my mind how this thing is all concrete. It just doesn't strike me as being safe, but then again it's allowed so it must be safe.
Well I am pretty sure it isn't your average concrete.

There are all kinds of plasticizers and filaments that can be added to concrete to give it incredible flexibility. Think about modern bridges with super long horizontal concrete spans. Traditionally concrete was only strong under direct vertical compression, but with advanced additives it can have greater tensile strength allowing a greater range of motion in applications where it needs to flex in the wind. The basic concept of compression strength is definitely still at work, but the conditions in which concrete can be used is greatly expanded.

Someone else probably has better information or a better explanation, but that is my novice understanding.
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Old June 15th, 2011, 11:52 AM   #1417
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Quote:
Originally Posted by speedy1979 View Post
Correct me if I'm wrong but don't you mean rigid/stiff as opposed to sturdy.
Sorry, that's what I meant. Not too much sleep for me lately, lol. Near full time job and summer classes


Quote:
Originally Posted by ExclusiveOne View Post
Is it as strong as steel?

It boggles my mind how this thing is all concrete. It just doesn't strike me as being safe, but then again it's allowed so it must be safe.
They are both relatively comparable in strength, but its really dependent on the exact method being used. In most cases, they are about the same. Steel is just less ridged than reinforced concrete.


Another reason they could be using reinforced concrete here is floor thickness. Steel mandates minimum floor plate thicknesses due to the construction method and thickness of the floor beams and plates, where concrete can be poured as an 8" thick slab (for most residential buildings) and be considered sound, allowing alot more space for duct work, and, overall, reducing floor plate thickness. With a tower this tall, the probably gained an extra floor or so.

Another thing to note: this tower is pretty damn thin. The added rigidity of reinforced concrete significantly reduces the sway with structures this narrow. If this thing were made out of steel it would sway like the John Hancock here in Boston sways (which is quite a bit on a slightly windy day, nevermind a storm).
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Old June 15th, 2011, 05:06 PM   #1418
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I really can't believe there is no core. Where are the elevators?
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Old June 15th, 2011, 05:33 PM   #1419
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I really can't believe there is no core. Where are the elevators?
In the elevator shaft..Which looks like the core but the purpose is only to serve for elevators..The structure is strong enough for itself..It's a well connected web of thick concrete walls..
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Old June 16th, 2011, 04:37 AM   #1420
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Is this "concrete web" re-inforced with steel rebar?
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