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Old November 6th, 2009, 06:17 PM   #101
crasho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by El_duque View Post
Creo que están preparando la exhibición del alcalde Santini en el Betzy dándose su pacesito.
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Old November 6th, 2009, 06:39 PM   #102
yosoyelrey
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WTF!
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Old December 25th, 2009, 07:36 AM   #103
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took a tour of the museum today. no pictures. maybe soon. very amazing. the details on the exhibits are incredible. the animals (well, dead animals,) are stunningly impressive.

Things to watch out for (from exterior view) in the near future:
- two roof bound exterior waterfalls
- one 900 pound, solid brass, 1.5 times real life size elephant to guard main entrance; being shipped in from Oregon smelters, courtesy of crowley


ETA: late march to early april
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Old December 25th, 2009, 08:54 AM   #104
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Looks like that elephant is not the only deal Santini signed in Oregon! =)
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Old December 26th, 2009, 05:49 AM   #105
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haha yep. hopefully it makes for good political ties. i like portland haha
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Old December 26th, 2009, 03:27 PM   #106
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davsot View Post
Looks like that elephant is not the only deal Santini signed in Oregon! =)
Why? is there good cocaine in Oregon too?
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Old December 26th, 2009, 06:52 PM   #107
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"Museo de vida silvestre".....de el caribe?...de la isla??
Tiene esta la exibicion de el qoqui?...tiene la replica de la laguna fosforecente??

Porque va a venir un turista de el mundo o europa a ese museo a ver replicas de animales que no son indiquenos de el area o la isla?
Puerto Rico todavia sufre de complejo inferior y por eso se pasa copiando lo que ve en otras partes sin tener sentido comun o relacion a la isla.
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Old December 26th, 2009, 07:13 PM   #108
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El Museo de Vida Silvestre no se construyó para turistas (aunque éstos son bienvenidos claro está).

Se construyó porque no todos los puertorriqueños tienen dinero para ir a Estados Unidos para poder ver un museo decente con animales y exhibiciones del mundo y aprender algo de fuera.

Y aunque si habrá exhibición de coquíes (duh, si no lo hacen pues malgastaron el tiempo bien duro lol) el público target del museo (los puertorriqueños) sabemos lo que es un coquí xD

Recuerda, los museos no son atractivos turisticos (aunque sirven como tales en muchas intancias) sino que son centros educativos
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Old December 26th, 2009, 10:26 PM   #109
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Dreamerguy, you hit it exactly.

The guy who gave me the tour, and who is in charge of the administrative side of the museums construction, was all about building this for the community.

Which is why, he said, santini got the idea: they noted that not many people in san juan and its metro area are in contact with natural animals. yeah sure, coquis and whatever but not lions and elephants and giraffes and elk, to name a few shadowing animals at the museum already.

how many public school kids, or even private school kids, get the chance to go on an african safari? or hike in the mountains? not many.

but thanks to santini, wealthy san juan families and families on the island who frequently go hunting, people can no see, up close, a real bear or a real elephant.

that was their idea anyway, and its going to be really cool.
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Old December 27th, 2009, 02:44 AM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamerGuy View Post
El Museo de Vida Silvestre no se construyó para turistas (aunque éstos son bienvenidos claro está).

Se construyó porque no todos los puertorriqueños tienen dinero para ir a Estados Unidos para poder ver un museo decente con animales y exhibiciones del mundo y aprender algo de fuera.

Y aunque si habrá exhibición de coquíes (duh, si no lo hacen pues malgastaron el tiempo bien duro lol) el público target del museo (los puertorriqueños) sabemos lo que es un coquí xD

Recuerda, los museos no son atractivos turisticos (aunque sirven como tales en muchas intancias) sino que son centros educativos
Exacto.
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Old December 27th, 2009, 03:23 AM   #111
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Yo hice la misma observación serrot.

Si yo quiero aprender de las aves de Puerto Rico, no hay muchos lugares. Igual pasa con muchos animales endémicos.

Sólo puedo esperar que le den suficiente presentación a los animales boricuas.
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Old December 27th, 2009, 06:38 AM   #112
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according to the guy, they are trying really hard to get native mammals from the island, the problem is the environmentalist's. the guy has been tracking down the guy from recursos naturales for the last two months over trying to get puerto rican bats in there, but he is ignoring him lol

they wanna do a dark room bat cave, but if they cant, then it will be the kids corner haha
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Old January 3rd, 2010, 05:01 AM   #113
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things to come, according to the guy:
--20,000 square foot ocean life expansion to the museum
--bat expansion
--hotel
--residential
--office
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Old January 3rd, 2010, 07:34 AM   #114
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oh wow, but dont understand why "residential" expantion on a Museum???
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Old January 3rd, 2010, 08:31 PM   #115
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it will all be a mega complex linking the museum (as one anchor) and the golf range (and its expansion, as another anchor.) they will be connected by means of a long plaza (a northward extension of the plaza currently seen at the front of the museum, and the office and residential will be on the property in between the two new municipal properties and extend way back east.

i guess the residential is just to make money haha
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Old January 3rd, 2010, 08:34 PM   #116
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Se tratará de este proyecto??

|>> http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=873722
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Old January 24th, 2010, 04:52 PM   #117
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^
yep, it does.
----------------------------------------------
(pictures in the link...
also, i hate this editor, so don't judge on adjectives and expressions used in the piece it wasn't me haha --feel free to comment negatively on any of that lol)

http://www.prdailysun.com/news/Into-...ld-in-San-Juan

‘Into the wild’ — in San Juan
Wildlife Museum set to open in late March
Sebastian Humbert


San Juan has gone wild. At least for animals, that is. With the upcoming inauguration of the “Museo de Vida Silvestre” (Wildlife Museum) on John F. Kennedy Avenue in late March, islanders will be able to enjoy a new cultural attraction like no other ever made in Puerto Rico.

Spearheading the 55,000 square-foot museum as its showpiece is “Noble Ruler,” a bronze cast African Elephant which will stand ground in the front plaza after being shipped in from Oregon in coming months.

The glistening, five-ton effigy will help keep watch over the San Juan maritime port as well as gracing a serene welcome to the more than 70,000 daily commuters traveling into the city via Kennedy Avenue.

Towering an impressive 25 feet high over the museum’s entrance plaza, and flanked by two building-top waterfalls, “Noble Ruler,” sculpted by Oregon artist Lorenzo Ghiglieri, will be the finishing touch on San Juan’s newest cultural highlight, which will also boast 200 other animals.

The exhibits are on the second floor of the museum, allowing visitors spectacular views overlooking the plaza, “Noble Ruler,” and the view across the San Juan bay. But before the sequenced exhibits begin, the Northern views should not detract from the centerpiece of the museum — a cross-floor atrium containing an action-packed safari scene.

Encased in a glass-rimmed courtyard, a $50,000 Giraffe and a $150,000 African Elephant — who have been preserved through taxidermy since being obtained and imported from the African continent — pose in magnificent reality. Animals aside, however, the scene is dominated by a 40-foot tall, life size model of an Adansonia Digitata tree, commonly known as the African Baobab tree.

The Baobab tree is huge, and although it almost reaches the skylight ceiling of the atrium, it would be one of the smaller Baobab trees found on the African Saharan plane. Some have been known to grow as large as 90 feet, but despite its relative modesty, the perfectly constructed tree is surrounded by a near real-life, busy scene typical of the region.

A pair of jealous, tree bound leopards perched above a rhino and hippo are just a few more animals gathered around the Baobab tree scene. Cleverly designed, the atrium features two distinctly different views — depending on which floor it is observed from.

San Juan’s art and cultural scene, excluding only a few museums and galleries, has typically been predicated by island-originated collections, something the San Juan wildlife museum stands apart.

The hundreds of foreign-born animals along with the many exotic habitats that house them is a welcomed change to the thousands of Puerto Rican families who have never been able to travel off-island.

Thanks to the donations of four Puerto Rican families, the dedication of a museum director, his staff and the support from San Juan Mayor Jorge Santini, a home-based safari will now be possible.

Between Isabel and Gabriel Cadena, Luis Rivera, Raphael Torres and the late Ralph Christiansen — nearly 2 million worth of animals were donated to the San Juan Wildlife Museum. Many of the donated animals had to be shipped in from places like Miami, including “Noble Ruler,” who has to make a lengthier 4,000-mile journey. The land and sea transportation from Portland for “Noble Ruler” was part of a donation by Sea Star Lines.

Speaking to the prominent nature of the San Juan Wildlife Museum, its director Rafael Cardona said that “there is nothing like this in the Caribbean,” and taking it a step further added that he couldn’t, “think of anything comparable in South America … albeit on a smaller scale, the closest comparison would be the Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C.,” he said.

Sporting his safari-esque, tan, button down shirt and jeans, Cardona is working round the clock to meet the museum’s opening date. Regarding the institution’s manifestation, Cardona credits persistence.

Prior to initial construction, it was a 15-year-old dream and a consistent two-year reality, whose concept had been wrung through the desks of four San Juan mayors. He added that meeting the completion date of late March is one of his highest priorities, consequential of live broadcast coverage from several local and international video broadcast outlets.

“We first met with Santini three years ago regarding the idea of the wildlife museum, and after the necessary series of procedures, stateside museum visits and meetings with heads of similar institutions, the groundbreaking ceremony was conducted in early 2008,” explained Cardona.

“It has all been moving very fast and very effectively. I couldn’t be happier or more excited,” he said.

As a graduate of the Univerisity of Puerto Rico’s education program, Cardona is also thrilled about a plan in the works to use the museum as a learning tool for the island’s youth.

“This museum is as much for children and students as it is for adults,” Cardona said, noting that one goal of his for the museum is to link it with educational campaigns.

“From elementary school (in coordination with the Department of Education) to higher education institutions and beyond, the museum is being designed for exciting school field trips for every educational level,” he said.

The museum will have its own curriculum that will be prepared by the museum’s curator and resident biologist, professor Raúl Pérez — who wields a PH.D from the University of Michigan. The particular curriculum will be shared with visiting teachers with enough preparation time to educate their class on the more technical aspects of the exhibits, “three days before students enter the museum,” said Cardona.

Another goal of Cardona is to create an engaging, “all ages experience” for museum visitors. A person’s experience will depend completely on the perspective that the visitor is viewing the museum and its exhibits from, he said.

“A five-year-old child will enjoy the museum in a very amazing way. He will see all of the exhibits from a wide but general point of view,” adding that a “kid’s corner” and interactive, “larger-than-life” sections are being included in certain exhibits for this age group.

But when that same child returns to visit the museum nine or 10 years later, his second time walking past “Noble Ruler” will seem very different to him, Cardona explained.

“The same child, now 14 or 15 years old, will be more observant to all of the details that the exhibits contain, and will be able to better connect his textbook and classroom studies with his real life experience at the museum,” he said.

Every nuance of nature seems to have had hours dedicated to its perfect recreation. During a tour of the facilities and its unfinished exhibits, one person even noted an apparent water leak. Which, as it turned out, was a recently completed section of the African Sahara habitat section intended to imitate a small oasis.

“They are experts,” Cardona said of Dixon Studios, which specializes in exhibit work.

The company has also worked on museums in other top markets, ranging from San Francisco to Rhode Island, he said, adding that Safari Club International was also consulted for museumology issues.

Cardona explained that the experiences of adults would be different than that of younger visitors.
“We will have people in their 40s, 50s, even 60s that will enjoy viewing the exhibits but also be able to make references to what they will be seeing in connection to their own, personal past experiences,” he opined.

He noted that older museum visitors would also be able to understand the importance of the animals on exhibit and their habitats in relation to the time-limited problem of global warming.

“The older patrons will be able to share the stories they read in the newspapers regarding the numbered days of some of the habitats that they will now be face-to-face with,” he said.

“Now they will be able to realize what they will be missing once global warming takes its toll.” Not so much as a goal as it has been a side effect, the museum tends to bring adults back to something of a childlike mind, Cardona said. Noting that while it is usually children who are extremely curious, in this case, the adults are the ones asking all of the questions.
“They get so involved and intertwined with the exhibits that they become very curious,” he said. “It is very rewarding to be asked a lot of questions. You get that nice feeling where you know your work is being appreciated,” he said. According to Cardona, the San Juan Wildlife Museum’s bill surpassed the $16 million mark, most of it covered by public and private funds. (WTF IS THIS LAST SENTENCE????? i mean, really?)

While a safari to an African desert or a South American tundra may start at $80,000, the museum estimates entrance fee will be $10.

Cardona estimates that a full run around the exhibits will take a tour between an hour to an hour and a half, but “you can spend much more time than that if you even begin to appreciate the dedication to detail and work that the exhibits entail,” he added.

The entrance fee will include a seat in the museum’s state-of-the-art theater, which will screen documentaries, Cardona said. The first documentary – already in filming stages and directed by local talent – will highlight the Puerto Rican bat, which is the only remaining mammal on the island. Hollywood actor Edward James Olmos and his wife, Puerto Rican actress Lymari Nadal, will narrate the documentary.

Two uncertainties that remain are the future tenants of the 5,618 square foot restaurant space and 2,286 square foot gift shop space. Cardona is in the process of reviewing proposals for the two sites, but is looking out for a precise restaurant occupant; something between “a type of ‘Rainforest Café’ or close to a high-end restaurant,” he said.

A more pressing matter, however, is whether or not the inclusion of all of the animals found on Puerto Rico will be a reality for the museum. The Department of Natural Resources has been the museum’s challenge in acquiring a red-tailed hawk, locally known as “guaraguao.”

Regardless of this setback, Cardona said he would be able to exhibit other Puerto Rican animals, such as the Gray Kingbird, known as the pitirre and the Bayamón turtle. The only two Puerto Rico native mammals in existence today, the Puerto Rican bat and the juita, will both be exhibited in the museum.

Although the juita no longer exists on the island, it is native to Puerto Rico. It looks like a small, cat-like mammal, Cardona said.

“We are arranging to see if we can acquire a couple of those mammals that are still alive, but who currently live in the Dominican Republic,” said Cardona. “This will be possible through coordination with the Dominican Republic Consul, Máximo Taveras.”

Even though the museum focuses on mammals from foreign and exotic habitats, Cardona recognizes the need to include those that are native. “Since this museum exhibits mainly mammals, we have the responsibility to include the limited number of mammals that still reside in Puerto Rico,” he said.

Energy conservation

Another responsibility recognized by Cardona is the modern need to be environmentally considerate. Thirteen thousand square feet of roof space on top of the museum will be used for solar power energy collection. “35 to 40 percent of the energy used by the building will be supplied by renewable resources,” Cardona said. “And on the other hand, we will also be saving energy with the inclusion of a ‘green wall’ on the exterior of the building as well as motion sensors on the lighting systems used over the exhibits.”

The construction of a “green wall” acts as natural building insulation. Ivy grown to cover a building wall, in place of traditional insulation, facilitate this and, in turn, reduce the warming effects that solar heat have on the interior of a building. The final product saves energy by requiring less usage of energy-hungry air-conditioning.

Sensors are another established method to save a lot of money in energy costs. “We will have the lighting system set up so that when a tour group is walking from one exhibit to another the area they just left will dim and the one they are walking into will light up,” Cardona said. “This saves energy in otherwise wasted illumination,” as well as the unnecessary heat the light would have created.

Although the building’s architecture firm, Ray Architects & Engineers, designed the building to reduce energy waste, private industry partnerships have been employed to cushion the museum’s already tight budget.

In return for their donations, sponsors are allowed to use some of the museum’s facilities free of charge, such as a 1,700 square foot conference room and the theater. Cardona said that use of the facilities depends on the donation. “Really, the sponsors are getting a much better deal than they are paying for, but we couldn’t have done it without them,” he said.

“Having this project handed to Puerto Ricans is something that gives you the satisfactory feeling you are fulfilling the desires of thousands of people who really wish to know and experience a completely different habitat from which they are used to,” Cardona stated.

Looking ahead

Future plans for the museum may include a 12,000 square foot addition for a Caribbean marine life and an adjacent Stone Age cave section.

“Santini’s main goal is to redevelop this entire area as another tourist zone for local and international visitors,” Cardona said.

“There are plans to extend the existing plaza all the way to the San Juan Golf Range and Golf Academy, just down the avenue. . . this is the beginning of a new center for this type of science, and many other, that will be developed in this sector off Kennedy Avenue . . . I am sure that we are not only going to have people to come enjoy our exhibits, but many scientists and academia will be a part of the museum as well …which may help facilitate new discoveries.”
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Old January 26th, 2010, 04:45 AM   #118
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@Sbstn: Este es tu reportaje?
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Old January 26th, 2010, 04:47 AM   #119
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Cheetah



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Old January 26th, 2010, 07:57 PM   #120
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@yosoyelrey: yep (of course the bad edits are not my doing), and thanks for uploading the pics!
i have not been able to get them out of the website...
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