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Old January 29th, 2009, 06:26 AM   #61
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Bowers Beach

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Old January 29th, 2009, 06:30 AM   #62
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Bowers Beach is a town on the Delaware Bay in Kent County. The population is around 325. Located at the mouth of the Murderkill River, Bowers Beach is a small fishing village, and also has a small number of beach houses. The town was a resort destination in the late 1800s and early 1900s, when boats ferrying people up and down the bay made vacationing at beach communities for city dwellers possible. Bowers Beach declined, though, when ocean communities continued to see widespread popularity, and bay communities were bypassed by railroads and later highways.
















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Old January 29th, 2009, 07:23 AM   #63
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Cute little church.
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Old January 30th, 2009, 08:04 PM   #64
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Cute little church.
It is a nice church. I posted these pictures in the Northest section and someone commented that it looks like a church that Norman Rockwell would paint a picture of.
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Old January 31st, 2009, 02:57 PM   #65
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These pictures are a couple years old. That crane is for the Renaissance Center, at 4th & King Streets.
Oh ok.
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Old February 3rd, 2009, 08:05 PM   #66
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Historic pictures of Bowers Beach, from the Delaware Public Archives:






Last edited by xzmattzx; February 3rd, 2009 at 08:26 PM.
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Old February 3rd, 2009, 08:32 PM   #67
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More historic pictures from Bowers Beach, courtesy of the Delaware Public Archives:







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Old February 5th, 2009, 10:58 PM   #68
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Some news about Polish history in Wilmington:

As I mentioned in post #42 on page 3, the Polish immigrants initally settled in the East Side neighborhood, then moved to Browntown on the west side when morocco factories and other factories opened up over there. Some Polish immigrants stayed on the East Side, however, and because of the small pocket of Poles, a small Catholic church was opened in 1912, St. Stanislaus Kostka on 7th Street. Next weekend, that church will close, as Catholics on the East Side have moved to other neighborhoods or to the suburbs. Many say that the closing is overdue, since there are literally just a handful of parishoners, but it is nevertheless a little saddening for everyone to see a piece of Polish history and Catholic history disappear.

Here's the article:

Quote:
Polish parish to close, leaving only memories
St. Stanislaus Kostka church doomed by declining attendance


Carolyn Raniszewski and Bernadette Drozd spent Tuesday morning as they always do, attending a series of religious services capped by a luncheon at St. Stanislaus Kostka Catholic Church on the city's East Side.

Together, the two represent more than 25 percent of worshippers who attend Sunday services, so it was no surprise the church was empty.

That's the main reason why the parish, founded in 1912 to accommodate an overflow of Polish-speaking immigrants, will close Feb. 15. There simply are not enough people showing up.

"It was long overdue and probably should have happened 10 years ago," said Robert Krebs, a Catholic Diocese of Wilmington spokesman.

The closing will be formalized Monday by a vote of diocesan officials, making it the first parish in Wilmington to close since Little Flower in 1971, according to the Rev. Tom Flowers, pastor of St. Polycarp parish in Smyrna, who has researched closings of Catholic churches in Delaware.

Its closing also is the first under Bishop Francis Malooly, who was installed as the diocese's ninth bishop in September. But the move was long discussed by the previous head of the diocese, Bishop Michael Saltarelli.

St. Stanislaus' loss of parishioners reflects a population shift that started when children of immigrants began moving to the suburbs, especially after I-95 was being built in the early 1960s, bisecting the city, Flowers said.

In 1950, Wilmington had 150,000 residents, dropping to 100,000 in 1960 and 50,000 in 1970. Since then, the population has climbed back to about 70,000, but the overall drop has been hard on parishes, he said.

"We have all these city parishes and you can certainly make the case that we don't need them all," said Flowers, whose grandfather, Anthony Kowalski, was a Polish immigrant who helped found St. Stanislaus.

The church was built because Wilmington's East Side Polish residents did not want to travel to Hedgeville to worship at the larger St. Hedwig Church.

It also was built in the shadow of the historic Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Episcopal Church on East Seventh Street.

Even though it was smaller than St. Hedwig and less famous than Old Swedes, St. Stanislaus members still felt their parish and its long-closed grade school had a tremendous impact on their lives.

Raniszewski, 76, said she met her husband while attending the parish school, which closed about 30 years ago. She grew up right across the street, when the entire neighborhood was Polish, she said.

"The entire classroom was filled with my brothers, sisters, cousins and neighbors," she said. "I've never left. This place has been my whole life. You come here and everyone knows your name and they're always here to help."

Raniszewski is the keeper of a logbook for the church's social group that meets each Tuesday. It's more than an inch thick, and is decades old.

She soon will log its last entry and has spent many recent nights trying to choose the right words.

She recently scanned through it and found its first entry, made about 30 years ago. She almost cried while trying to describe it.

"It was written by my mother," she said. "I understand why all this is happening, but it's hard. I get halfway through a sentence and I start to well up."

Former parish grade school students Marie Jankowski and Antoinette Kozlowski-Brzozowski, both New Castle County government employees, remember the nuns and priests as old-school disciplinarians.

"The nuns had no problems smacking us and the priests did the same with the boys if they had bad report cards," Jankowski said. "And all our parents told them to go right ahead."

Kozlowski-Brzozowski said there was a reason for that.

"No parent ever complained because they were as loving as they were strict," she said. "If you had a problem, the church had a problem. No one was ever alone."

At the time of the church's founding, that part of the city, now mostly made up of black residents, was a mix of Italians, Ukrainians and Poles who wanted to worship among their own people, Flowers said.

Many Italians were drawn to Little Flower at 15th and Thatcher streets in the Northeast, which was founded in 1925 but also closed due to the city's changing demographics.

Other parishes have remained despite low membership because people identify with them, Flowers said. Usually there is pain, anguish and anger when people talk about a closing, he said.

But St. Stanislaus is different. There are so few members that people understand it has to happen.

Drozd, 63, said she is at peace with the closing. She grew up in Southbridge, attended the parish grade school, then taught there as a single woman in her early 20s. Most of her students were the children of her classmates when she was a student there.

She said her teaching days were among the happiest in her life, even though she was paid less than $2,000 a year and worked a lot of overtime, cleaning the church or moving furniture in the classrooms.

"You never thought twice about doing extra," she said. "You respected and admired the adults who came before you and wanted to be just like them, so when they asked you to do something, you just did it."

When Drozd's father died when she was in the sixth grade, she remembers the men in the parish looking out for her. Still, she understands the need for the closing.

"There will be no fight to keep it open or anything like that," she said. "The parish has served its purpose. We understand that it's time for it to go. What makes it easier is that everything you look back at is good. There is not a bad memory."

It also was built in the shadow of the historic Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Episcopal Church on East Seventh Street.

Even though it was smaller than St. Hedwig and less famous than Old Swedes, St. Stanislaus members still felt their parish and its long-closed grade school had a tremendous impact on their lives.

Raniszewski, 76, said she met her husband while attending the parish school, which closed about 30 years ago. She grew up right across the street, when the entire neighborhood was Polish, she said.

"The entire classroom was filled with my brothers, sisters, cousins and neighbors," she said. "I've never left. This place has been my whole life. You come here and everyone knows your name and they're always here to help."

Raniszewski is the keeper of a logbook for the church's social group that meets each Tuesday. It's more than an inch thick, and is decades old.

She soon will log its last entry and has spent many recent nights trying to choose the right words.

She recently scanned through it and found its first entry, made about 30 years ago. She almost cried while trying to describe it.

"It was written by my mother," she said. "I understand why all this is happening, but it's hard. I get halfway through a sentence and I start to well up."

Former parish grade school students Marie Jankowski and Antoinette Kozlowski-Brzozowski, both New Castle County government employees, remember the nuns and priests as old-school disciplinarians.

"The nuns had no problems smacking us and the priests did the same with the boys if they had bad report cards," Jankowski said. "And all our parents told them to go right ahead."

Kozlowski-Brzozowski said there was a reason for that.

"No parent ever complained because they were as loving as they were strict," she said. "If you had a problem, the church had a problem. No one was ever alone."

At the time of the church's founding, that part of the city, now mostly made up of black residents, was a mix of Italians, Ukrainians and Poles who wanted to worship among their own people, Flowers said.

Many Italians were drawn to Little Flower at 15th and Thatcher streets in the Northeast, which was founded in 1925 but also closed due to the city's changing demographics.

Other parishes have remained despite low membership because people identify with them, Flowers said. Usually there is pain, anguish and anger when people talk about a closing, he said.

But St. Stanislaus is different. There are so few members that people understand it has to happen.

Drozd, 63, said she is at peace with the closing. She grew up in Southbridge, attended the parish grade school, then taught there as a single woman in her early 20s. Most of her students were the children of her classmates when she was a student there.

She said her teaching days were among the happiest in her life, even though she was paid less than $2,000 a year and worked a lot of overtime, cleaning the church or moving furniture in the classrooms.

"You never thought twice about doing extra," she said. "You respected and admired the adults who came before you and wanted to be just like them, so when they asked you to do something, you just did it."

When Drozd's father died when she was in the sixth grade, she remembers the men in the parish looking out for her. Still, she understands the need for the closing.

"There will be no fight to keep it open or anything like that," she said. "The parish has served its purpose. We understand that it's time for it to go. What makes it easier is that everything you look back at is good. There is not a bad memory."

Longtime parishioner Carolyn Raniszewski straightens the vestments on a statue of the infant Jesus on Tuesday at St. Stanislaus Kostka Catholic Church on East Seventh Street in Wilmington, which was founded in 1912.



Longtime parishioners Bernadette Drozd (left) and Carolyn Raniszewski are among the few who attend weekly mass.

http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/p...=2009902040344
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Old February 6th, 2009, 05:30 PM   #69
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I have a small Friday treat for everyone, which I'll be posting later on today.
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Old February 6th, 2009, 09:34 PM   #70
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Last week, we got a little bit of snow, so I drove to colonial New Castle and took some pictures.










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Old February 6th, 2009, 09:35 PM   #71
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Old February 6th, 2009, 09:35 PM   #72
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Old February 6th, 2009, 09:39 PM   #73
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Old February 8th, 2009, 05:51 PM   #74
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Awesome photos of New Castle.

The very first place I lived was in Historic New Castle. I was too young then to remember anything now.

Living in Wilmington, I'm just minutes away and love returning for Old New Castle Day and Separation Day festivities.
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Old February 9th, 2009, 01:03 AM   #75
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Originally Posted by HOME in D-ware View Post
Awesome photos of New Castle.

The very first place I lived was in Historic New Castle. I was too young then to remember anything now.

Living in Wilmington, I'm just minutes away and love returning for Old New Castle Day and Separation Day festivities.

I love visiting Old New Castle as well. I just cannot believe that so few people in the Northeast don't know about New Castle. They're midding out on a great place. Then again, having a hidden and quiet colonial town to ourselves is pretty nice. I don't know if I would want it to be overrun with tourists.
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Old February 10th, 2009, 01:43 AM   #76
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I love visiting Old New Castle as well. I just cannot believe that so few people in the Northeast don't know about New Castle. They're missing out on a great place. Then again, having a hidden and quiet colonial town to ourselves is pretty nice. I don't know if I would want it to be overrun with tourists.
That is why Old New Castle is a thousand times better than Colonial Williamsburg.

It's actually a real town containing thousands of real homes and only a few museums.

When I think about it, there are no major signs directing travelers to the town from I-95 or I-295. Having the two mile wide Delaware River to the south and east, business/industrial parks to the west, and typical 50s/60s suburban neighborhoods to the north; no wonder few people know a charming colonial town is located there.
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Old February 28th, 2009, 06:41 AM   #77
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DELAWARE'S BLACK HISTORY

Delaware has a rich African American history. Despite being a small state with one of the smallest populations in the 1800s, Delaware had the largest Free Black population of any state, not only per capita but outright. There were around 20,000 Free Blacks in Delaware according to the 1860 Census.

Delaware was also an important stop on the Underground Railroad. Many slaves ran northward or eastward from the Eastern Shore of Maryland to Delaware, then travelled north to Wilmington, Philadelphia, or Canada. One of the most famous workers on the Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman, helped several groups of slaves escape through Delaware to Wilmington and ultimately to Philadelphia, and in later years to Canada. Tubman herself escaped from Dorchester, Maryland, to Dover, and then escaped further to Wilmington. Due to the large number of Quakers in Wilmington, the Abolitionist movement and the Underground Railroad had considerable success.

Below are some key sites in Delaware that are related to Delaware's Black history as Black History Month comes to an end.


This house on West Street in Wilmington's Quaker Hill neighborhood was a stop on the Underground Railroad. Runaway slaves were hidden in the basement of the house. There is a legend that a tunnel connected the house to the Christina River waterfront, down the hill about 4 blocks away.



Tubman-Garrett Park on the Riverfront in Wilmington was co-named after Harriet Tubman and Thomas Garrett. Tubman and Garrett worked together in Wilmington to help transport runaway slaves northward to Philadelphia, Boston, or Canada. Tubman would bring the runaways to Garrett from places farther south in Delaware, such as Smyrna or Blackbird. Garrett, a Quaker, would then use contacts within his church and his religion to continue transporting the runaways. Garrett worked as a Station Master openly, and at one time he was found guilty of helping slaves escape and lost all of his possessions to the court.



Knotty Pine Restaurant is an institution in the Black community of Wilmington. The restaurant is one of the few places in Delaware that serves muskrat, a uniquely Delawarean food.



Clifford Brown Walk is named after Clifford Brown, a Wilmington jazz musician who is regarded as one of the greatest trumpet players ever. Brown was killed in a car accident in 1956 at the age of 25, cutting his music career short at only 4 years of recording.



The Clifford Brown Jazz Festival is held in Rodney Square every June as a memorial to Clifford Brown. The event began in 1989 and has become the largest free jazz festival on the East Coast.





Like other ethnicities, churches were the center of the neighborhood. Like the Catholic neighborhoods of Wilmington for the Polish, Italians, and Irish, the Blacks has their own Catholic church to serve the community. St. Joseph's Church





St. Joseph's Industrial School, a school for African American Catholic boys in Clayton. The school attracted the best Black Catholics from around the country for high school education.



Hockessin School No. 107, a Colored school in Hockessin. In 1954, Bulah v. Gebhart was a case that challenged segregation in Delaware schools. Shirley Bulah was a student who had to either walk to Hockessin School No. 107 or be driven to her school, even though a bus that took Whites to their school drove past her house. The Bulah v. Gebhart case was joined with Brown v. Board of Education in the U.S. Supreme Court and was used to overturn segregation nationwide.



Louis Redding was a Wilmington lawyer who was the first Black admitted to the Delaware bar. Redding represented Shirley Bulah in the Bulah v. Gebhart case, and when the case was lumped with Brown v. Board of Education, Redding was part of the legal team that represented the plaintiffs at the U.S. Supreme Court.



Lawyer Redding Museum is located in Louis Redding's house, moved from 10th & French Streets to its current site on 11th Street in the 1990s. The house has since been renovated and is now open as a museum since this picture.



Peter Spencer was born as a slave in Maryland but was freed and settled in Wilmington as an adult. Spencer was one of the most influential African Americans of the early 1800s. Spencer organized the first independent Black church in the United States in Wilmington. He also began the August Quarterly, the oldest African American festival in the United States, in Wilmington. Peter Spencer is buried here in this grave and memorial in Peter Spencer Plaza in Wilmington.



Judy Johnson was a Negro League baseball player. Born in Snow Hill, Maryland, in either 1899 or 1900, Johnson moved to a house on Delamore Place in Wilmington in 1905 with his family in 1905. Johnson played baseball as a kid in the park at 2nd & Clayton Streets that now bears his name. Johnson is regarded as the best third baseman in Negro League history, and is also considered one of the best defensive third basemen ever. Johnson was the first African American to coach in Major League Baseball. Judy Johnson lived in this house on Kiamensi Avenue in Marshallton after retiring.

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Old February 28th, 2009, 06:44 AM   #78
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HISTORICALLY AFRICAN AMERICAN PLACES IN DELAWARE


Buttonwood, a settlement north of Old New Castle, now since incorporated into the city of New Castle













Jimtown, a Free Black farming community located 4 miles southeast of Lewes



Chamomile, a neighborhood in Lewes centered on Park Avenue



Dunleith, a subdivision built near New Castle in the early 1950s and marketed to Blacks







Southbridge, a neighborhood in Wilmington inhabited in the mid-1800s by Free Blacks and some runaway slaves













Townsend, a community originally called "Charley Town" until the Delaware Railroad came through and a town was formed













The Village, a neighborhood centered on New London Road in Newark





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Old March 11th, 2009, 02:29 AM   #79
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Is it true that New Castle and Delaware City were founded to rival Philadelphia?
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Old March 14th, 2009, 08:39 PM   #80
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Are there any old buildings from the New Sweden colony left in Delaware?
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