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Old December 20th, 2003, 03:50 PM   #1
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Clearwater Development News

HEre's one article, more to come later:

Tower to contain public parking
Clearwater will buy up to 100 spots in the planned Station Square to replace parking sacrificed for the project.
By JENNIFER FARRELL, Times Staff Writer
Published December 20, 2003

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


CLEARWATER - The 10-story condominium, restaurant and retail tower planned downtown next to the city's historic post office will include 100 public parking spaces on Cleveland Street.

Pegged by city officials as a catalyst for downtown redevelopment, the $25-million Station Square project would remake a parking lot next to Station Square Park and include a restaurant and retail space on the ground floor.

Designed to complement the post office's Mediterranean Revival architecture, the proposal features masked parking on the first five floors, topped by 146 condominiums with one and two bedrooms.

Developers hope to begin construction in June and finish in 12 to 14 months.

Ray Cassano, a downtown property owner and health food distributor, who also is prominent in local Scientology circles, is heading a group of local investors backing the project.

Designed by Beck Development LLC, a Dallas builder, the complex marks the first high-rise, mixed use redevelopment project downtown in 15 years.

Nick Pavonetti, director of development management for Beck, said his firm sees opportunity in the struggling downtown.

"We believe that Clearwater has the opportunity to become another Sarasota," he said. "It's our modus operandi to be the first one in."

According to plans on file with the city, the project includes outside seating for a 9,904-square-foot restaurant. Pavonetti said a market study will help determine which restaurant and retailers will be involved in the project.

"There's no names that we can discuss," he said. "We expect to have a major restaurant. I can't really tell you any more at this point."

City commissioners, sitting as the Community Redevelopment Agency, sought requests from developers for the project. The plans are scheduled for review Jan. 20 by the city's Community Development Board and approval is contingent on a development deal with the CRA, according to city planning director Cyndi Tarapani.

As part of the deal, Clearwater Custom Floors, the two-story building at 628 Cleveland St. owned by Cassano, 51, and his wife, Kim Bright Cassano, will be demolished.

City officials have said they are prepared to spend up to $1.25-million to buy back the 72 public parking spaces on the existing lot and then some, up to 100. Most of the money would come from the sale of the property, which has been appraised at $720,000.

The remainder would come from money that has been set aside for the CRA, according to Assistant City Manager Ralph Stone.

Under the proposal, developers are seeking 85 units from a density pool set up in the downtown redevelopment plan as well as an increase in the building height limit to 158 feet.

"We're very excited about it," Stone said Friday. "It brings two things that we really value downtown. One is additional residential and the other is ground-level retail and restaurant space right in the heart of Cleveland Street."

- Jennifer Farrell can be reached at 445-4160 or [email protected]

http://www.sptimes.com/2003/12/20/No...ain_publ.shtml
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Old December 20th, 2003, 10:37 PM   #2
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This project is practically a gaurentee to go through, the developer and city are working very closely together on this. Heres another news link on this that was just posted on MSNBC.

http://famulus.msnbc.com/famuluscom/...7.asp?bizj=TAM

Also the City is pushing hard to open a new movie theater complex downtown since there isn't one first run theater in town (Oldsmar is the closest one I can think of) Expect more news on that in the coming months.

Last edited by Meffy; December 20th, 2003 at 10:42 PM.
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Old December 21st, 2003, 05:49 AM   #3
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This sounds awsome!


Be sure to keep us updated on this project! More great things happening in Florida!
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Old December 22nd, 2003, 04:04 PM   #4
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EXCLUSIVE REPORTS
Clearwater's plan has it all
Commercial, retail and residential make up project
Ken Salgat
Staff Writer
CLEARWATER -- The City of Clearwater has teamed up with construction firm The Beck Group to develop a $40-million mixed-use project on the site of the Station Square Parking Lot downtown.

The approximately 1-acre project will include an 11-story building with two floors of commercial and retail. The top floors will be reserved for residential.

The first floor will consist of 15,000 square feet of retail and one large restaurant. Major components of the project include a restaurant fronting on Cleveland Street and potential for office space.

The residential component will have 146 condominium units over several floors of structured parking.

Construction is expected to commence in the early summer, said Reg Owens, the city's economic development director.

"We selected The Beck Group and have been meeting with them on a regular basis to finalize the development agreement," said Owens, who added he expects the final agreement to be approved in early February.

The Beck Group is scheduled for community board approval on Jan. 20.

"After that approval, we will consummate the development agreement with them," said Owens.

The partnership has been more than seven months in the making.

On May 12, the Clearwater Redevelopment Agency authorized the issuance of a bid proposal to select a development team to redevelop the Station Square Parking Lot site as a mixed-use infill development.

The agency made the site available for redevelopment as a catalyst for new urban housing and professional office use in the downtown core.

Owens said the original infill site contained approximately 36,000 square feet. The Beck Group proposed to enlarge the site by acquiring an additional 6,500 square feet, and the city agreed.

Once both sides agreed on development specifics the process took off.

"We (the city) have a process in place where we put together a quick-response team to meet with the developer on an immediate basis," said Owens.

In addition, the city will start up a $5-million streetscaping program as an incentive to development.

The program will begin in November on Cleveland Street between Myrtle Avenue and the bayfront. Cleveland Street will be made more pedestrian friendly, said Owens.

The city will be buying back into the project 100 public parking spaces, he said.

To reach Ken Salgat, call (813) 342-2477 or send your e-mail to [email protected].

http://www.bizjournals.com/tampabay/...ml?t=printable
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Old December 22nd, 2003, 04:04 PM   #5
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EXCLUSIVE REPORTS
Condo towers depend on city's plan
Ken Salgat
Staff Writer
CLEARWATER -- The face of downtown Clearwater will get a significant lift if three towers and 150 condominiums are added.

Glendale, Calif.-based Mainstreet Clearwater Development LLC recently purchased the AmSouth building at 400 Cleveland St. On Dec. 12 the company closed on the $1.6-million purchase of Cleveland Street storefront property formerly owned by Calvary Baptist Church.

The latter purchase constitutes approximately 28,000 square feet stretching from 401 to 428 Cleveland St.

The owners have consolidated the AmSouth and Calvary properties and could be planning a large redevelopment project, said Bill Horne, city manager.

A Clearwater developer familiar with principals at Mainstreet said Mainstreet has preliminary plans to build as many as three mixed-use towers. The towers could house more than 150 luxury condominiums and ground-level retail.

However, Mainstreet will not release any concrete plans for the site until the city finalizes its downtown redevelopment plan, said Tom Wright, spokesman for Mainstreet.

"The plan is contingent upon the City of Clearwater completing its downtown redevelopment policy," said Wright. "They were to have it done by November, but I understand its been pushed back to next year. Overall, we are not bothered much by the length of time it's taken the city to get this done. But now that we own it, it's back on the tax roll so the city's happy."

Mainstreet may not have to wait as long as it anticipated for the redevelopment plan.

Horne said that the city commission has approved a redevelopment plan, but it needs to clear a two-step county approval process to become effective.

The first step was taken Dec. 16 when the county approved the plan. In doing so, it also gave the city the authority to develop a tax increment plan to help fund redevelopment projects, said Horne.

"The next step is for the county to approve the tax-increment trust fund, which probably won't be approved until February," said Horne. "That will give us a new plan that will allow developers to move forward with their projects. Future development is really contingent upon the plan being approved."

Until the redevelopment plan is approved, the new owners are allowing the church's hardship and singles ministries to continue to occupy the properties for at least six months, said Wright.

Depending on the church's needs and the release of the downtown redevelopment plan, this arrangement may be extended on a month-to-month basis, he said.

To reach Ken Salgat, call (813) 342-2477 or send your e-mail to [email protected].

http://www.bizjournals.com/tampabay/...ml?t=printable
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Old December 22nd, 2003, 04:05 PM   #6
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City's designs to draw people
Clearwater's principles for its downtown revitalization aim to attract people who stroll the sidewalks, sip coffee in courtyards and chat in plazas.
By KELLY VIRELLA
Published December 22, 2003

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


CLEARWATER - Before Starbucks opened on Cleveland Street at S Fort Harrison Avenue, the intersection was just a plain set of crosswalks.

People walked by on their way to lunch at Cajun Grill Express, the buffet at 421 Cleveland St., barely stopping to notice the 77-year-old Wiseman Building.

Then the coffee shop added a patio to the building and installed an arcade of windows along its facade.

"The corner came alive," said Gina Clayton, Clearwater's long-range planning manager. "Pedestrians are drawn to it because people are sitting on the patio people-watching. You can look inside the store and see people."

Lively is what Clearwater's planning department and commissioners would like to see the rest of downtown become. And, those officials say, one way to achieve that is through close attention to the design of buildings and streets.

The planning department, in conjunction with a committee of residents, will soon begin formulating a list of the features that they believe downtown streets and buildings must have to draw people. On Thursday, the City Commission approved a set of 20 or so principles from which the features will be derived.

The principles offer a preview of the city's design priorities. For example:

New buildings should be "compatible" with surrounding structures in terms of height, width and depth.

Blocks in the downtown core should be small.

Parking lots and garages should be unobtrusive.

Courtyards, plazas and other public spaces are encouraged.

The final list of features will be called design guidelines. They won't require the remodeling of existing buildings, but will apply to all new construction.

"You have to make it an interesting place to walk," said Cyndi Tarapani, the city's planning director. "You have to give people a reason to want to be there."

Clayton declined last week to give examples of buildings whose designs drive people away. "Our philosophy is that we don't put any property owners on the spot," she said. "If we have a development proposal in front of us and it isn't working out, we deal with it then."

The look and feel of a building or street is crucial to the success of downtown revitalization projects, said Trent Green, an associate professor of architecture and urban design at the University of South Florida.

People complain that downtown Tampa and other cities are dead, as if it were an accident, he said. "Guess what?" he said. "It's designed that way."

Before pedestrians will use a particular street, the windows and doors of the buildings on it must open to the street, Green said. Dead streets are often lined with buildings that turn their backs to pedestrians.

"We can design a building in such a way that it repels life," he said. "If you walk along a full city block and there are no windows and no way to go into a building, generally people will avoid that street."

Parking lots located in front of buildings isolate pedestrians on sidewalks from the people inside of the building, he said. Courtyards and plazas unite pedestrians.

The height, width, and depth of buildings also affect pedestrian's affinity for a particular neighborhood, he said. The proportions of the buildings in a neighborhood establish its identity, or character, he said.

"The first thing you encounter is the character of a place," he said. "Either you like it and it makes you want to come back or you don't."

Green and other experts tout Orlando as an example of a Florida city that has leveraged design guidelines to stimulate downtown growth.

For years the north side of the city's downtown was a sea of parking lots, said Kristin Larsen, associate professor in the University of Florida's department of urban and regional planning.

Adopting design guidelines brought people and housing back downtown, Larsen said. "They had a very strong vision of what they wanted their city to look like and they stuck to it," she said.

Yet, their guidelines were flexible enough to accommodate reasonable variation, she said. "I have seen guidelines that get down to architectural details on buildings, that require a porch that is 5 feet deep and 20 feet wide" she said.

"There should be certain unifying elements, but to overdo it so that you hamstring people makes all buildings look the same."

Flexibility also keeps costs low, said Robert Stroh, director of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing, a University of Florida research center. "A tile roof or a certain selection of exterior materials may really contribute to the design of a building," he said. "But on the other hand, the developer might not be able to control the cost."

With the help of Clearwater's planning department, a committee of 15 residents will steer the development of the city's design guidelines. Keeping them flexible is one of their primary objectives, Clayton said.

"We've got a good process in place with the steering committee," she said. "We've got a good cross section of people from architects to contractors to residents."

The committee's schedule of meetings and its agenda will be posted on the city's Web site, www.myclearwater.com Clayton said. Every draft that the committee produces also will appear on the city's Web site, Clayton said.

People living in the affected areas will get letters about the new guidelines, she said.

Clearwater developers Ben Harrill and Jerry Figurski said they have faith that the city will adopt reasonable guidelines.

But the men, whose proposal to build 150-foot-tall condo towers near the Old Bay neighborhood was rejected earlier this year, questioned whether the planners who review development projects will also be reasonable.

"The devil is in the details," Harrill said.

"The devil will lie in the hands of people who review proposals," Figurski said.

http://www.sptimes.com/2003/12/22/No...s_to_dra.shtml
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Old December 22nd, 2003, 04:06 PM   #7
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I find it funny that they want to be like Sarasota

Anyway, here's something about Largo sort of getting its head out of its ass (these are actually much more like real townhouses than the suburaban two story apartment that is so often called a townhouse).

Townhouses catch on with home buyers
Builders launch two townhome projects and an apartment complex to meet demand.
By LORRI HELFAND, Times Staff Writer
Published December 22, 2003

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


LARGO - The trend to multifamily living, such as townhouses and apartments, is gaining momentum in Pinellas's third-largest city.

Two townhome projects, each with more than 100 units, are under way on Starkey and Ulmerton roads.

Downtown, the 54 townhomes in the West Bay Village complex, anticipated for their new urbanism flavor and the urban renewal they might inspire, are nearing completion.

And in the northern sector, 180 apartments will be built next year near Ponce de Leon and Clearwater-Largo Road.

It's a pattern of new home construction seen throughout Pinellas. With few pieces of easy-to-develop land remaining in Largo, many builders are erecting townhomes and apartments rather than single-family homes, said Largo's Community Development Director Mike Staffopoulos.

Townhomes also seem to be popular for residents wanting to break out of apartment living.

"A lot of people renting apartments don't want to be renting anymore," said Mary Latuszek, a representative at the 112-unit Seminole Palms townhomes project being built by Atlanta-based Beazer Homes.

That's one reason Jaime and Brenda Castro moved there. They were looking for an investment without having to pay much more than they did as a renters.

At Seminole Palms, which is off Starkey Road, two- and three-bedroom homes cost about $122,000 and $141,000 before upgrades.

"We were looking for houses in a budget range of what they have here," said Castro, 29, who works in airport security.

About 70 units have been sold at Seminole Palms. Beazer has completed about 16. More than 60 are in construction.

The units will have 1,205 and 1,607 square feet, 21/2 baths, vaulted ceilings and will be wired for security systems.

Around the corner, on the south side of Ulmerton Road, is the Cumberland Trace townhomes project bring built by Minneapolis-based Rottlund Homes.

Rottlund Homes broke ground on the 126-unit development two months ago. Sixteen homes are being built now. By spring, the first units should be completed.

The two-bedroom, 11/2 bath units, range from about $126,000 to $130,000 and feature lofts, one-car garages and security systems. Thirty four have been sold, according to Bud Levell, representative for Cumberland Trace. Buyers "have been across the board," he said. "Some people from up North who want a summer home, and some young professionals."

Cumberland Trace and Seminole Palms each will have a swimming pool and cabana room.

In February, the Richman Group of Florida plans to break ground on the apartment complex along the Clearwater-Largo Road corridor.

The new construction has caught the attention of city leaders, some of whom predict a spike in Largo's population, which is just less than 75,000.

"The area is on fire," said City Commissioner Charlie Harper. "It's growing by leaps and bounds. I fully expect to be at 80,000 in a couple of years."

Lorri Helfand can be reached at 445-4155 or at [email protected]
http://www.sptimes.com/2003/12/22/No...tch_on_w.shtml
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Old December 22nd, 2003, 06:27 PM   #8
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Developer hopes townhomes appeal to young crowd

form the Jacksonville Business Journal- 22 Dec. 2003

Ken Salgat
Staff Writer

CLEARWATER -- Developer Clearwater Village LC plans to redevelop an entire city block into two-story townhomes.


The $10-million, 3.5-acre project called New York Lofts will face Laura Street and Grove Street and will be fully encompassed by Booth Avenue and Martin L. King Avenue. Pre-construction prices for the 46 units range from $192,000 to $222,000, but those numbers will change.

"Our prices are too low, and we're reviewing price increases," said Bud Reichel, Clearwater Village principal. "Our intention is to sell half before construction and then increase the price by a minimum of $10,000 after that. If we can get $20,000 more, we will."

Reichel and city officials said new residential is wanted and needed in the area. He hopes New York Lofts will bring young professionals Downtown.

Ralph Stone, assistant city manager overseeing economic development, echoed Reichel's sentiments.

"We have really good residential development opportunities wrapping around Cleveland Street," Stone said.

The loft project is not the first for Reichel in Clearwater, but it is expected to have a much faster approval process.

Reichel's company is in the final stages of developing Clearwater Village at Kings Highway and State Street. Clearwater Village has 129 single-

family and multifamily units on more than 12 acres, which took Reichel years to acquire and receive approval to develop.

Reichel said he expects to receive the the final permit to build New York Lofts by mid-January. Groundbreaking is scheduled for March.

"It is definitely the type of project we want to see Downtown, and we're actively promoting Downtown residential," Stone said.

Ken Salgat is a staff writer with The Business Journal of Tampa Bay, a sister publication.

link: http://jacksonville.bizjournals.com/...22/focus4.html
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Old December 24th, 2003, 03:09 AM   #9
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Clearwater will never be Sarasota.
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Old December 24th, 2003, 07:53 PM   #10
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NOt as long as you-kow-who runs the place.
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Old January 21st, 2004, 04:35 PM   #11
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[Urban Studio Architects]
The Station Square proposal, shown in this rendering, would include a restaurant and retail space on the ground floor topped by 146 condominium units. Developers hope to begin construction on July 1 and finish in 12 to 14 months.

Downtown tower okayed
A city board approves the $30-million residential-retail project.
By JENNIFER FARRELL, Times Staff Writer
Published January 21, 2004

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


CLEARWATER - A city board on Tuesday approved plans for a 14-story condominium, restaurant and retail tower planned downtown next to the city's historic post office.

Pegged by city officials as a catalyst for downtown redevelopment, the $30-million Station Square proposal includes 100 public parking spaces on Cleveland Street.

The project, designed to complement the post office's Mediterranean revival architecture, would remake a parking lot next to Station Square Park and include a restaurant and retail space on the ground floor, topped by up to 146 condominium units with one and two bedrooms.

Developers hope to begin construction July 1 and finish in 12 to 14 months.

Ray Cassano, a downtown property owner and health food distributor prominent in Scientology circles, is heading a group of local investors backing the project.

Designed by Beck Development LLC, a Dallas builder, the complex marks the first high-rise, mixed-use redevelopment project downtown in 15 years.

On Tuesday, the city's Community Development Board unanimously approved the plans, which include a reduction in parking requirements and an extra 85 units granted from the city's downtown incentive pool for public amenities.

According to plans on file with the city, the project includes outside seating for a 9,904-square-foot restaurant.

City commissioners, sitting as the Community Redevelopment Agency, sought requests from developers for the project. Tuesday's approval is contingent on a development deal with the CRA.

As part of the deal, Clearwater Custom Floors, the two-story building at 628 Cleveland St. owned by Cassano and his wife, Kim Bright Cassano, will be demolished.
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Old January 21st, 2004, 09:05 PM   #12
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^That looks like it will be a nice fit in downtown Clearwater. Its about time downtown Clearwater has started to grow vertically.
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Old January 21st, 2004, 09:06 PM   #13
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I like it a lot. Downtown Tampa could use a few buildings that scale and look.
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Old January 21st, 2004, 11:14 PM   #14
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I like that building alot too.

I agree that DT Tampa could use about 5-6 of those kinds of projects scattered around northern DT. However, I also hope that Tampa manages to build a few buildings in a more modern style. Perhaps something a little South American (modernist) in influence.
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Old January 21st, 2004, 11:27 PM   #15
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That does look like a great project for downtown. Do most of the buildings in downtown resemble something like that? Or is it just a nice blend?
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Old January 21st, 2004, 11:35 PM   #16
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There are a number of smaller buildings 2-5 stories that have a similar type of facade, but nothing bigger. The taller stuff is all newer.

Jasonhouse - patience.
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Old February 10th, 2004, 08:44 PM   #17
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Trying to get some info on this thing (see bold section)

December 2003 Issue
Clearwater Building Boom
by Joe O'Neill

Clearwater wants to be known for more than a great beach, awesome sunsets and a drive-though downtown. To that end, city officials are aggressively marketing downtown to developers, getting creative with incentive packages and investing in infrastructure amenities while putting out the word that there are prime parcels — public and private — for redevelopment. This includes City Hall itself, which overlooks the harbor.


According to Reg Owens, the city’s director of economic development and housing, the campaign has generated about 65 face-to-face meetings with developers — predominately residential — over the last year.


“What’s really driving us is the national trend for urban living,” Owens says. “Clearwater is safe and clean. Properties can be assembled, and there’s a water view. And now that so much is built out, developers are looking at infill projects. We qualify.”


Owens would get no argument from Nick Pavonetti, director of development for Beck Development LLC, which is set to begin the 140-condominum Station Square by the end of the first quarter of 2004. “Clearwater is ripe for downtown residential,” Pavonetti says. “The support of everyone from Mayor [Brian] Aungst down is the reason we’re here.”


Among other planned downtown projects is the 20-story, $80-million Clearwater Bay Club, a hotel-condo-retail hybrid. “If you’re putting something into the ground, this is the place,” says Lee Arnold, CEO and chairman of Colliers Arnold, the developer of Clearwater Bay Club. “We see pent-up demand.”

Ralph Stone, Clearwater’s assistant city manager, put the prospects in perspective. “Clearwater doesn’t enjoy position on the transportation network, but we do enjoy a unique piece of geography,” points out Stone. “We can bring the waterfront into downtown. This could be Dunedin on steroids.”


Clearwater city officials and developers alike have done double takes when they looked west and glimpsed their pristine beach through the filter of reality. It saw world-class sand and water — but many second-class properties. And so they’re doing something about it.


The $350-million Bluewater Isle Resort was one of the most prominent proposals for development when it was announced last year, but uncertain financing has left its prospects a question. On the other hand, it’s nothing but clear sailing for JMC Communities, which opened the Mandalay Beach Club luxury condominums last year. Now, JMC is building Belle Harbor Condominiums on Mandalay Avenue, which will total 200 residences when it opens next spring. Some condos are priced at more than $1 million.


“We looked at the beach market and saw a lack of recent quality development,” says Lee Allen, JMC’s vice president of finance, “and a lack of supply of quality second homes.”


It’s the same story for hotels, according to Richard Gehring, a partner in the ownership group developing the Seashell Hotel near mid-beach. Seashell Resort LLD hopes to break ground by the end of next year on its 250-unit, $85-million project.


“We’ve had a lot of city support on issues such as density,” Gehring says. “There’s been no new resort development here for some time. And there’s still strong visitation.”


It’s all enough to get Mike Meidel gushing like the Clearwater Regional Chamber of Commerce president that he is. “I’d call it a self-feeding catalyst,” Meidel says. “The city’s doing streetscapes and public amenities pools. We’re recruiting retail and restaurants. A number of residential properties are going through the permitting process. All the parts are coming together.”
http://www.tampabayillustrated.com/i...icharticle=343
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Old February 10th, 2004, 08:53 PM   #18
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March 19, 2003
Clearwater downtown condos could start next summer
Colliers Arnold Commercial Real Estate Services Inc. reported Wednesday that it plans to start work as early as next summer on an $80-million redevelopment project in downtown Clearwater that will include approximately 100 condominium units.

The Clearwater-based company hopes to close on the acquisition of the redevelopment site this summer, said Lee Arnold, chairman of Colliers Arnold. The 1.7-acre site includes the building currently being used as the city's main public library, along with adjacent parking lots and an office building owned by the Church of Scientology.

"Altogether we will have assembled a site that has frontage on Drew Street, Osceola Street and Fort Harrison," Arnold stated in a release.

A sophisticated site planning process now under way could include between 92 and 110 condos, many with premium water views, priced from the $500,000 range, he said. The 250,000-square-foot development may also include upscale retail space and luxury hotel rooms, he said.

Architect Richard Gillette developed initial plans for the project, Arnold said.
http://www.bizjournals.com/tampabay/...ml?t=printable
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Old February 12th, 2004, 03:33 AM   #19
Jasonhouse
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I really hope that DT Clearwater takes off alot more. I would rather see Clearwater beach not get built up too much more, just because of the disaster potential.

A few buildings 15-20 stories tall would be a nice start.
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Old February 20th, 2004, 01:44 AM   #20
Jasonhouse
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Some stuff is already happening...



Belle Harbor... 2 x 14 story condo towers, as well as 2 x12 story condo towers. The towers are surrounded by two blocks of townhouses.








Bella Rosa... 10 stories... 32 units.




Utopia... 9 stories... 29 units.





Bayview... 6 stories (And I think a 2nd 5 story?)... 28 units.






There were two other projects along the intercoastal further up towards Dunedin... I couldn't get a pic of either, because of traffic.


One was Del Mar Vista, which was 5 stories and almost topped out. I don't know how many units.

The last one was Dunedin Arms, which was 28 units and 7 stories. It was undergoing siteprep (and sales I imagine).




I still think that even with the new Causeway, that the DT Clearwater/Clearwater Beach/Sand Key area suffers from very poor connectivity. I really hope that they do build something like a monorail on a dedicated ROW to serve DT clearwater and the two keys of Clearwater. Hell, they could rake in the cash by charging "event" fares during Spring Break and peaks in the tourist season. Couple this with tolls on visiting autos going out to the keys and the city could wind up paying very little to run a well ridden and effective transit line.
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