daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Airports and Aviation > Airports

Airports discussions about existing airports



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old December 31st, 2005, 03:30 AM   #601
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Dec 31, 2005
S'pore keen to improve air links with more nations

FIRST, China. Now, the rest of the world. After inking a deal last month for unlimited flights between Singapore and China, Transport Minister Yeo Cheow Tong has his sights on other countries.

The aim is to enhance Singapore's connectivity so that it can boost its air hub status.

As he said during Thursday's Istana meeting that Cabinet ministers had with Singapore Airlines (SIA) manage- ment and unions: 'The greater the connectivity, the better transfer point we become.'

The pact with China opens up the fast-growing China aviation market to SIA, allowing it and its sister airline, SilkAir, to fly to any city in China.

Now, SIA and SilkAir operate 81 weekly passenger flights to nine cities in China.

While admitting that other countries are not likely to be as 'liberal' and 'generous' as China, Mr Yeo believes similar agreements can be signed.

'I think many countries are also realising that if they want their tourism sector to grow, if they want their economies to grow, they must liberalise their aviation regime,' he said.

'So we are working on them. We're telling them that, 'look, Singapore is a good partner because we have a lot of tourists coming through Singapore. If you liberalise with us, you can tap into the market that we have'.'

The air services agreements are part of a larger plan to enhance Changi's position as an air hub.

Besides China, Singapore is also keen to increase air links with India, Australia and parts of Europe.

In addition, Changi Airport will continue to be improved, so that 'the Changi experience for passengers is something that we're not going to find elsewhere in the world'.

After Terminal 2's upgrading is completed, it will be Terminal 1's turn for a facelift, said Mr Yeo.

In the meantime, Terminal 3 is scheduled to be completed in 2008, and he promised that it will be 'unsurpassed' in service and comfort level.

The Government's $300 million fund, announced in Parliament in March this year, will also kick in during the new year to boost its partnership with airlines and draw even more carriers here.

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 2nd, 2006, 05:05 AM   #602
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Jan 2, 2006
Take the cover off KL-S'pore route

By Cassey Lee and Ivan Png

THE Malaysian government began a new chapter in the liberalisation of its domestic passenger air travel market when it allowed the budget airline AirAsia to operate in 2002.

There is little doubt that consumers in Malaysia have benefited significantly from this. The relatively low fares offered by AirAsia meant that more consumers can afford to fly both on domestic as well as on a few international routes.

Today, AirAsia's share in the Malaysian domestic market is estimated to be 25 per cent. While some of AirAsia's market share may have come at the expense of national carrier Malaysia Airlines (MAS), most of it is likely to come from the creation of 'new demand' in response to the low fares offered - consumers who would not otherwise have travelled by air.

To the Kuala Lumpur government's credit, both airlines have been allowed to compete. However, there is room for further improvement.

One issue that has been debated in the Singapore Parliament, which then prompted heated discussion in Malaysia's media, is further liberalisation of the Kuala Lumpur-Singapore shuttle route.

Several interesting facts have emerged from this debate.

First, the air fare for this route is relatively high - around RM713 (S$310) for a round-trip between KL and Singapore.

Second, under the 1980 Air Services Agreement (ASA) signed by Malaysia and Singapore, all net revenues of MAS and Singapore Airlines are shared 50:50, with each airline bearing its own operating costs.

Third, both airlines have a dominant position in the KL-Singapore shuttle route. The combined market share of both airlines in this sector is estimated to be 85 per cent.

Singapore's Transport Ministry has stated that it is in favour of opening up the KL-Singapore route to more competition, but that this is only possible if Malaysia agrees to liberalise the ASA. However, in a recent Malaysian media report, KL's Transport Ministry was quoted as not being in favour of changing the present arrangements.

We do not know whether this is an official view of the ministry. We believe the Malaysian government should seriously consider liberalising the KL-Singapore shuttle route by adopting an open skies policy for the route.

The main issue that prevents this appears to be the perception that Singapore will gain more than Malaysia if such a policy is adopted, since MAS has only one destination - Singapore - whereas SIA/SilkAir has many destinations - the major cities in Malaysia. However, this reasoning is too narrow.

First, in estimating the 'national' welfare gains, Malaysia needs to expand its list of 'domestic carriers' to include AirAsia in the ASA negotiations. This implies including airlines that are substantially owned by Malaysians and not just those owned by the Malaysian government (69 per cent of MAS' equity is owned by Penerbangan Malaysia Berhad, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of Malaysia's Minister of Finance Inc).

Furthermore, liberalising the sector by allowing new entrants does not entail any subsidy on the part of the KL government. It merely expands business opportunities for Malaysian companies and makes the sector more competitive.

Second, liberalisation will enhance consumer welfare, in the form of benefits arising from more affordable air transport and shorter travel time. Greater competition within this sector would significantly lower fares.

Aside from benefiting local consumers in Malaysia and Singapore, it would also boost tourism in both countries.

The KL-Singapore route is perhaps the busiest of all air passenger routes between Malaysia and other countries. Singapore is also the most important source of Malaysia's tourist arrivals: Some 9.5 million people from Singapore visited Malaysia in 2004.

Furthermore, business will also benefit from lower air transportation costs. Cost-effective transport is key to Kuala Lumpur's role as a regional business hub. More choice and lower fares on the KL-Singapore route will benefit Malaysian business.

Third, there is a commitment among Asean member countries to fully liberalise direct passenger services among member nations by 2008. In December 2004, Brunei, Thailand and Singapore signed an open skies pact to liberalise their air transport sectors ahead of the 2008 deadline. Malaysia will benefit from 'first mover advantages' that would arise from joining such a network of low fare airlines.

In sum, the Malaysian government should seriously consider liberalising the KL-Singapore shuttle route by adopting an open skies policy for this sector. Holding back competition will only forestall the development of Malaysia's airline industry. Sure, there will be adjustment costs in the short run, but these should not prevent Malaysia from adopting policies that will make its economy more competitive in the long run.

Cassey Lee is an associate professor at the University of Malaya. Ivan Png is Kwan Im Thoong Hood Cho Temple Professor at the National University of Singapore and a Nominated MP.

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 5th, 2006, 08:32 PM   #603
Fabio
Go Habs! Go!
 
Fabio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Montréal-QC
Posts: 5,087
Likes (Received): 12

nice airport, T1 looks old, but still really good, anymore pics?


__________________
Vive la joie de vivre Montréalaise!
Fabio no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2006, 02:33 AM   #604
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Jan 16, 2006
Record 32m pass through Changi Airport
A sterling year for airport, thanks to new airlines, more flights and attractive fares

By Karamjit Kaur
Transport Correspondent

NEW airlines, more flights and attractive fares combined to make 2005 a record-breaking year for Changi Airport.

More than 32 million passengers passed through Changi last year - a more than 5 per cent jump from the previous record of 30.35 million set in 2004, The Straits Times understands.

The amount of freight handled is also expected to exceed 2004's record 1.78 million tonnes by 2 to 3 per cent, inching past the 1.8 million tonne mark, sources indicate.

Official numbers are expected to be released by the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) tomorrow.

Industry players are not surprised Changi had a good year.

Traffic rose for two reasons:

More airlines and flights - As of Dec 1 last year, the airport was served by 83 airlines operating a total of 3,986 flights a week to 179 cities in 57 countries.

In 2004, 74 airlines flew to Changi, operating 3,728 weekly flights to 174 cities in 55 countries.

New carriers that started flying to Singapore last year include China's Yangtze River Express, Adam Air from Indonesia, Pakistan International Airlines and two private Indian carriers - Jet Airways and Air Sahara.

The entry of low-cost carriers like Tiger Airways and Jetstar Asia reduced airfares to regional destinations like Bangkok, Jakarta and Hong Kong.

Depending on the destination and time of travel, airlines were cutting prices by about 20 to 40 per cent to grab market share, said Ms Alicia Seah, general manager of SA Tours.

Boosting traffic were impulse travellers flying out of Singapore on the spur of the moment, said Mr Philip Ho, general manager of travel portal Zuji Singapore, which saw online sales grow by 115 per cent last year over 2004.

More passengers means better business for airport retailers like Nuance-Watson, which operates 16 outlets at the two terminals, selling cosmetics and perfumes.

Executive general manager Ken Tse said that sales last year should hit $185 million, up from 2004's $170 million.

'We especially saw a big jump in sales to Australian, Chinese and Indian travellers,' he said.

'For the last three months of 2005, the Indians overtook the Japanese in terms of total amount spent.'

An optimistic Mr Tse expects passenger traffic this year to continue to grow, by about 8 per cent.

Changi's strong performance last year is consistent with global trends. The International Air Transport Association, which represents 264 airlines, expects passenger traffic for the year to have grown by about 7.8 per cent.

And with strong government backing, Changi aims to stay ahead of the competition from regional air hubs, and meet the threat of new long-range aircraft that can bypass Singapore.

This year, the airport authorities were given $300 million spread over three years, to boost its partnership with airlines and lure even more carriers to Singapore.

Millions are also being spent on upgrading the two existing passenger terminals; building a third to be ready by 2008; constructing a budget terminal for low-cost carriers, which opens in March; and readying airport infrastructure for the world's biggest commercial aircraft, the Airbus 380.

With the government's continued backing of Changi's strategic role, Mr Shukor Yusof, Standard & Poor's aviation editor, said: 'Any potential downside risk for Changi is limited, given the favourable market demand, efficient operations, a strong competitive position and a solid financial profile.

[email protected]

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 18th, 2006, 05:57 PM   #605
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

18 Jan 2006
Singapore Changi Airport Wins 23 Awards in 2005

Changi also sets new records in passenger, cargo and air connectivity numbers

In the year 2005, Singapore Changi Airport was honoured to continue to win commendations from travellers and organisations helping it garner 23 best airport awards. These awards were bestowed upon Changi Airport by international publications and trade organisations. Changi Airport also celebrated another record-breaking year as passenger and cargo numbers hit 32.43 million movements and 1.83 million tonnes respectively in 2005.

Changi Airport's most recent awards came from German and American travellers. Readers of the prestigious Business Traveller ( Germany ) magazine voted Changi the 'Best Airport in the World' and 'Best Airport in Asia Pacific', for the 13th and 4th consecutive year respectively. The two awards were presented to Changi Airport on 17 January 2006 in Frankfurt. In the latest survey conducted by the Global Traveler magazine, the American travelling community voted Changi as the world's best airport. The publication presented the award to Changi Airport on 18 January 2006 in New York.

"Every award Changi Airport wins is a boost to the morale of all airport staff and a recognition of their efforts and commitment to quality service. At the same time, it is a reminder to us not to rest on our laurels. While celebrating a bountiful harvest of 23 awards, we thank Changi's passengers for their support and assure them that our airport staff will remain steadfast in their service commitment", said Mr Wong Woon Liong, Director-General of Civil Aviation, Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore.

"Global Traveler readers have selected Singapore Changi Airport as the 'Best Airport in the World'. It's no wonder, with its beautiful facilities and smooth operations, frequent travellers find that this is not an airport they want to rush through, but enjoy," said Mr Francis X. Gallagher, Publisher & CEO of Global Traveler magazine.

The 32.43 million passenger movements handled by Changi Airport in 2005 represents an increase of 7% over the 30.35 million passenger movements achieved in 2004. Air cargo movement at Changi Airport also continued to perform well last year, with the airport handling a record 1.83 million tonnes of airfreight, a 3.3% growth over the 1.78 million tonnes handled in 2004.

Apart from awards and traffic, Changi Airport's air connectivity reached an all-time high, with 83 airlines operating over 4,000 weekly scheduled flights to 180 cities in 57 countries as at 1 January 2006. In particular, weekly scheduled flights grew by 7% compared to about 3,700 weekly scheduled flights operating at the beginning of 2005. Changi's air network also expanded, with four new airlines joining the family in 2005 - Jet Airways, Air Sahara, Adam Air and Yangtze River Express. Changi Airport also welcomed the return of Pakistan International Airlines and Merpati Nusantara Airlines.

Commenting on future growth, Mr Wong said, "Changi Airport expects its weekly flight frequencies to continue to grow in the first quarter of 2006, with most of these increases coming from Singapore carriers". Singapore Airlines has announced new services to Karachi and Lahore in February 2006 as well as to Abu Dhabi , Dubai and Moscow in March 2006. On 10 January 2006, Tiger Airways commenced 3 weekly services to Danang while Jetstar Asia and Valuair will launch new services to Bangalore and Bali respectively in the first quarter of 2006. "These frequency increases will further enhance Changi's connectivity within Asia, as well as further destinations in the Middle East and Russia ," Mr Wong continued.

http://www.changi.airport.com.sg/cha...=1137599570226
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2006, 03:15 PM   #606
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

01 February 2006

SATS wins PIA tender to manage Karachi flight kitchen
By Loh Kim Chin, Channel NewsAsia

SINGAPORE : Singapore Airport Terminal Services has signed an agreement to provide technical services to Pakistan International Airlines, or PIA.

The services include the management of PIA's flight kitchen at Karachi, as well as to establish quality management systems and improve processes.

SATS will also help PIA to improve and develop its inflight meals.

For the second phase of the collaboration agreement, SATS and PIA will set up a joint venture to provide inflight catering services at airports in Pakistan.

The joint venture company's business will be managed by SATS.

The Singapore ground handler and airline catering services provider was selected after a comprehensive tender and evaluation exercise. - CNA /ct

Copyright © 2006 MCN International Pte Ltd
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 14th, 2006, 12:10 PM   #607
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Business Times - 14 Feb 2006

Major management revamp at CAAS unit

New chairman, CEO among changes at subsidiary that develops airport projects abroad

By GEORGE JOSEPH

(SINGAPORE) The Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) unit set up to develop and manage airport projects overseas has undergone some key management changes.

The moves come soon after Changi Airport Managers and Partners (S'pore) Pte Ltd (Champs) - a wholly owned subsidiary of CAAS - pulled out at the last minute last September from a bid to build and run New Delhi's international airport.

CAAS, which owns and operates Changi Airport, last month appointed veteran property and construction consultant Chow Kok Fong chief executive officer of Champs - a post that had been vacant for a while.

Just two months earlier in November, corporate veteran and former KPMG partner Bobby Chin Yoke Choong was appointed chairman of the company, replacing Boon Swan Foo.

Sources say there have been other changes in the company's senior management, and that more private sector executives have joined following some resignations.

Besides a chairman and a CEO, Champs is run by general manager James Yip and about 20 senior managers, including several formerly from CAAS.

Mr Chin comes to Champs after many years as global accounting firm KPMG's top man in Singapore operations. He is also chairman of the Urban Redevelopment Authority and a board member of OCBC Bank. He was managing partner of KPMG Singapore from 1992 until his retirement last September and was awarded the Public Service Medal in 2003.

New CEO Mr Chow has been with property developers and construction companies for more than 20 years. He spent several years as a senior executive with the CapitaLand group, and used to head the former Construction Industry Development Board.

CAAS formed subsidiaries to capitalise on a global move to upgrade airports, especially in Asia, Latin America and Africa. It was also envisaged that CAAS companies could tap the expertise within CAAS and draw on the track record of Changi Airport as one of the world's best airports.

With airport infrastructure being used to the limit in many parts of the world, airport development and upgrading is growing into a big industry.

According to the Airports Council International, airports spent US$31 billion on new infrastructure in 2004 and another US$36 billion is scheduled to be spent this year.

But the CAAS units have not yet entered the big league of airport developers and operators. They are seen as not aggressive enough in bidding for overseas projects or investing globally.

Champs was recently in the news over its withdrawal from the tender for the privatisation and construction of Delhi airport, following differences of opinion with Indian partner Bharti Enterprises. Champs maintained it needed more than the stipulated time to do a good job with the project, while Bharti was prepared to go ahead with the bid.

The pullout caused some anxiety and unhappiness in India, and this was made known to government leaders. The flap drew a comment from Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew that Singapore would have to change its style if it wanted to remain a major hub amid rising competition from emerging players.

'I think we must learn to take more risks,' he said in November, following a visit to the Middle East and India, singling out the Bharti-Changi consortium as an example of how an opportunity was lost as a result of trying to protect the Singapore brand name.

India is pushing ahead with reforms in the aviation sector to ease foreign ownership limits on airlines and open its skies to foreign airlines. It is also inviting foreign equity participation in the building and running of airports. And so is China, which started its reforms earlier. Together, the Asian giants offer the best opportunities in airport infrastructure investments.

In the past 20 years, there have been more greenfield airport projects in Asia than anywhere else, according to the Geneva-based International Air Transport Association (Iata).

'Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Seoul, Guanzhou, Shanghai, Osaka and Nagoya have opened completely new facilities. Bangkok will open a new facility sometime in the near future. Major terminal expansions are underway or completed in Singapore, Manila, Taipei, Beijing and so on,' Iata's director of communications Tony Concil told BT.

'At the same time, we face a critical situation in India where investments are lagging behind traffic development. In October, we called for emergency measures in Delhi and Mumbai to address the capacity concerns, as well as a long-term plan for airport development. If not, then the US$12 billion in aircraft orders placed by Indian carriers last year will have no place to operate from when they are delivered. Adherence to safety and global standards will be critical,' said Mr Concil.

The plan to privatise and redevelop Mumbai and Delhi airports was at the forefront of India's ambitious hopes to revitalise air travel and cope with rising demand. India is spending US$150 billion to improve transport infrastructure.

Changi Airport, through its subsidiaries, is also looking at opportunities in China. Through Champs and another subsidiary, Singapore Changi Airport Enterprise (SCAE), it provides consultancy and has invested in airport projects around the world, including Costa Rica, Peru and London's Luton Airport.

More recently, SCAE signed a memorandum of understanding with Hangzhou Xiaoshan International Airport to provide training and consultancy services to Hangzhou Airport, and for the two airports to explore commercial opportunities jointly.

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 4th, 2006, 02:31 AM   #608
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

^Hmm....seems like they are busy expanding their network....
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 7th, 2006, 11:24 AM   #609
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

March 6, 2006
Seletar bursting at the seams, say firms
If expansion decision is not made soon, they may shift overseas

By Karamjit Kaur
Aviation Correspondent

SINGAPORE'S aerospace industry is booming and companies located around Seletar Airport are desperate to expand facilities that are bursting at the seams.

But for more than two years, repeated requests for expansion have been rejected, they say, because the Government has not decided whether Seletar should be developed for the aerospace industry.

Seletar - Singapore's first airport and a former military airbase and which opened in 1929 - mostly houses aircraft maintenance and repair companies, flight training schools, private chartered flight operators, and medical evacuation services.

Insiders warned that if a decision is not announced soon, Singapore could end up the loser.

It is believed that Senai Airport in Johor, which is controlled by Malaysian tycoon Syed Mokhtar Al-Bukhary, has offered some of the companies based at Seletar free land if they relocate for the long term.

The Straits Times understands that another option being considered is moving the Seletar companies to a new location near Changi Airport's Runway 3, currently used mostly by the military.

Asked if there were plans to upgrade Seletar Airport and the land around it where about 30 companies are located, the Economic Development Board's director for logistics and transport, Mr Manohar Khiatani, said: 'We are studying all options to ensure that there is sufficient land for aerospace industry growth.'

Many of the Seletar companies prefer to remain in Singapore.

Among these are Australian-based Hawker Pacific, which opened its aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul facility at Seletar Airport in 1973.

'From a strategic point of view, Singapore is the place to be,' said the company's senior vice-president, Mr Rene Frandsen. 'It has the right hub status, the right image and is economically well-driven.

'With the upcoming integrated resorts, we also foresee an increase in corporate and private jet activities.'

But his company here, which maintains Dassault Falcon and Raytheon-manufactured corporate and business aircraft, needs to be upgraded, Mr Frandsen said, adding that with enough facilities, Hawker Pacific could double its business.

'We are prepared to invest $10 million to $15 million in a new facility, but we need a clear indication from the Government on its plans for Seletar,' he said.

'As much as we would like to stay here, if we cannot expand, we will have to consider moving our regional headquarters to, for example, Malaysia, or another neighbouring country.'

Hawker Pacific, which has two hangars in Manila and offices in Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta and Beijing, is prepared to move to a new location near Changi Airport if necessary, he said.

Jet Aviation, an authorised service centre for Bombardier, Cessna, Gulfstream and Boeing business jets, has seen its business double in the last 12 months, said general manager Thomas Ruedisuehli.

The company's hangar at Seletar can handle up to eight business jets at a time and it has been operating at capacity for the last two years. 'There is more activity in the region, the general economy has improved, and we get more private jets coming in for maintenance and other works.'

Singapore's aerospace industry, with its approximately 100 companies, posted a record $5.2 billion in output last year, up from $4.4 billion in 2004.

Apart from Seletar Airport, companies are also located at Paya Lebar Airport, Loyang and Changi. p> ST Aerospace, which accounted for almost a quarter of the industry's output last year, is also keen to expand operations at Seletar because there is little room for growth at the other locations, said its president Tay Kok Khiang.

'Even the hangars we just built are well-utilised,' he said. 'The point is, we are full and our customer base requires us to support them with more capacity.'

[email protected]

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 11th, 2006, 01:04 AM   #610
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

March 11, 2006
Outgoing air force boss to be CAAS No. 2
He will assume post in civil aviation authority from May 2

By Karamjit Kaur
Aviation Correspondent

OUTGOING air force chief Major-General Lim Kim Choon is moving to civil aviation after a 30-year career in the military.

Maj-Gen Lim, 48, will be appointed as the second highest-ranking official at the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) from May 2, the CAAS has confirmed in response to queries from The Straits Times.

He will serve as senior deputy director-general. There are two other deputies to the director-general but none is in a senior position.

A CAAS spokesman said Maj-Gen Lim's appointment is 'to strengthen the CAAS' senior management team'.

Sources said it is also to allow him to understudy Mr Wong Woon Liong, who became direc tor-general in 1992, and eventually take over the top job.

Maj-Gen Lim is not new to civil aviation. He joined the CAAS board in May 2001, occupying the seat typically reserved for the air force chief.

He stepped down in August last year to make way for his air force successor, Brigadier-General Ng Chee Khern, who was then director (joint operations and planning directorate).

Mindef said last week that Brig-Gen Ng, now Chief of Staff (Air Staff), will become the next air chief on March 24.

Maj-Gen Lim is joining the CAAS at a time when Changi Airport is fighting fiercely to reinforce its status as one of Asia's busiest and key airports, as it competes with regional heavyweights like Hong Kong, Dubai and Kuala Lumpur.

Last year, Changi handled a record of more than 32 million passengers and more than 1.8 million tonnes of freight.

In two weeks, it will open a new terminal for budget airlines.

Competition is tough.

Kuala Lumpur International Airport built its own low-cost carrier terminal in under nine months and will open it on March 23, just three days before Changi's opening.

Maj-Gen Lim is out of town and could not be reached for comment.

[email protected]

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 15th, 2006, 08:05 AM   #611
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Seems like they are going to open the new skytrain in 2006!!!!

Here's a model on display at T2


What's on display
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 15th, 2006, 10:55 AM   #612
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

The technical info


Route Map
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2006, 02:05 AM   #613
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

March 16, 2006
Changi's handling fees drop by 10-15%
Airport ground-handling charges down after new player Swissport comes on board

By Karamjit Kaur
Aviation Correspondent

ADDED competition has brought down ground-handling charges at Changi Airport by about 10 to 15 per cent since global giant Swissport started offering passenger check-in, baggage and cargo services last March.

The Swiss-based company, which won the licence to be Changi's third ground-handler in June 2004, now services six airlines including Thai AirAsia, Adam Air and Swiss World Cargo.

Two more - Northwest Airlines currently handled by Changi International Airport Services (CIAS) and Tiger Airways now served by Singapore Airport Terminal Services (Sats) - will soon be added to the list.

Swissport, which operates in 174 airports in 40 countries, handled 2 million flights and 3.5 million tonnes of cargo last year, with an estimated revenue of $1.85 billion.

The company, which officially opened its 17,600 sq m warehouse at Changi Airport's air freight terminal yesterday, is keen to expand its presence in Asia with Singapore as the regional centre, said Swissport executive vice-president for cargo Ludwig Bertsch.

Capable of handling 250,000 tonnes of cargo a year, the facility will increase Changi's cargo handling capacity to 3 million tonnes.

The Government decided to award the third ground-handling licence to have more competition and lower fees for airlines, enhancing Changi's position as an aviation hub competing with Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur and Dubai.

Transport Minister Yeo Cheow Tong, who officiated at the warehouse opening, was asked by reporters if he was satisfied with the 10 per cent to 15 per cent drop in rates so far.

He said: 'I think it is within the range that we expected. However, we still expect the competition to further intensify and how each of them (the three ground-handlers) will react will be left to be seen.'

Mr Yeo was also asked for an update on the Government's plans for the close to 30 aerospace companies located at Seletar Airport.

Many are frustrated because they have not been allowed to expand their facilities for several years now and have not been told if they will be able to stay at Seletar for the long term.

The Transport Ministry is working with the Economic Development Board (EDB) on how Seletar Airport can be further improved, Mr Yeo said, adding that while one option being considered is to move the companies to a new location near Changi Airport, it has cost implications.

He said: 'Many of the companies have already invested quite a fair bit of money in Seletar.' He added that the development of the land around Seletar Airport comes under the purview of the EDB.

On the issue of Singapore-Australia air rights, he said there has been no official word on Australia's decision more than three weeks ago not to grant Singapore Airlines trans-Pacific rights.

While Singapore will continue to press for a more liberal air services agreement, Mr Yeo said: 'I think they owe us the courtesy of telling us officially about the outcome of our talks.'

[email protected]

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2006, 11:39 AM   #614
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

March 23, 2006
Changi rolls out part of new train system
It's ferrying transit travellers between 2 terminals; open to public next year

By Karamjit Kaur
Aviation Correspondent

CHANGI Airport's new $135 million People Mover System started operating last week to ferry transit passengers between Terminals 1 and 2.

The train, which travels faster than the 16-year-old existing Skytrain, opens to the public early next year. The Skytrain will then cease to operate.


By then, plasma television screens at the stations will announce when the next train is due - a feature not available on the existing system. The train's cabins will also have flight information on liquid crystal display (LCD) screens.

The Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) started work on the new system in 2002. By the time Terminal 3 is ready in 2008, trains running on 6.5km of tracks - compared to about 1.5km now - will be zipping people between the three terminals in minutes. The entire system will have seven stations, up from just two now.

But those heading for Changi's new Budget Terminal - which opens this Sunday - will have to be content with free shuttle buses. A CAAS spokesman told The Straits Times that the People Mover System would not be including that terminal on its route to 'keep costs low' for airlines and passengers.

The Mitsubishi consortium building the system is also working on several other airport train projects in Dubai, the United States and South Korea among others, said Mr Ozaki Takahid, who manages the machinery department at Mitsubishi Corporation.

Other big airports like Kuala Lumpur International Airport and London's Heathrow also use trains to ferry people between the different terminals. Such systems are 'indispensable to any major airport', said the CAAS spokesman, as passengers may have to catch connecting flights in different terminals.

Terminal 2 is now being upgraded at the cost of $250 million, which will add restaurants and shops for both passengers and visitors, among other new facilities.

The $1.75 billion Terminal 3 is also starting to take shape. The main building's physical structure is almost completed.

A passenger on the People Mover System which debuted on Thursday in the restricted area said he looked forward to its onboard flight information features which will come onstream early next year.

Marine engineer Anthony Samarasekera, 50, who lives in Sri Lanka and was catching a flight to Brisbane in Australia, said: 'If you're moving from one terminal to another to catch a flight, you want to know when the boarding gate will close, for example.'

He had one grouse. Although the train was faster - 60kmh compared to the Skytrain's 48kmh - it was a jerkier ride as the train picked up speed to leave a station and decelerated quickly to stop.

CAAS said these glitches will be ironed out.

Retired teacher Alfred Wong, 67, is looking forward to the trains running around the clock instead of from 6am to 1.30am now. He said: 'Planes take off and land 24/7.'

The People Mover System will operate 24 hours by 2008, CAAS said.

http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/mnt...3-23/train.pdf

[email protected]

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2006, 03:32 PM   #615
Hikmatullah
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 3
Likes (Received): 0

Skytrax is a biased agency and always award Chek Lap Kok without any reason. No doubt, CLK is among the best airports but Skytrax loves this airport and hence its always on the top of their charts
Hikmatullah no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2006, 04:22 PM   #616
ignoramus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 3,020
Likes (Received): 4

Quote:
Originally Posted by babystan03
March 23, 2006
Changi rolls out part of new train system
It's ferrying transit travellers between 2 terminals; open to public next year

By Karamjit Kaur
Aviation Correspondent

CHANGI Airport's new $135 million People Mover System started operating last week to ferry transit passengers between Terminals 1 and 2.

The train, which travels faster than the 16-year-old existing Skytrain, opens to the public early next year. The Skytrain will then cease to operate.


By then, plasma television screens at the stations will announce when the next train is due - a feature not available on the existing system. The train's cabins will also have flight information on liquid crystal display (LCD) screens.

The Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) started work on the new system in 2002. By the time Terminal 3 is ready in 2008, trains running on 6.5km of tracks - compared to about 1.5km now - will be zipping people between the three terminals in minutes. The entire system will have seven stations, up from just two now.

But those heading for Changi's new Budget Terminal - which opens this Sunday - will have to be content with free shuttle buses. A CAAS spokesman told The Straits Times that the People Mover System would not be including that terminal on its route to 'keep costs low' for airlines and passengers.

The Mitsubishi consortium building the system is also working on several other airport train projects in Dubai, the United States and South Korea among others, said Mr Ozaki Takahid, who manages the machinery department at Mitsubishi Corporation.

Other big airports like Kuala Lumpur International Airport and London's Heathrow also use trains to ferry people between the different terminals. Such systems are 'indispensable to any major airport', said the CAAS spokesman, as passengers may have to catch connecting flights in different terminals.

Terminal 2 is now being upgraded at the cost of $250 million, which will add restaurants and shops for both passengers and visitors, among other new facilities.

The $1.75 billion Terminal 3 is also starting to take shape. The main building's physical structure is almost completed.

A passenger on the People Mover System which debuted on Thursday in the restricted area said he looked forward to its onboard flight information features which will come onstream early next year.

Marine engineer Anthony Samarasekera, 50, who lives in Sri Lanka and was catching a flight to Brisbane in Australia, said: 'If you're moving from one terminal to another to catch a flight, you want to know when the boarding gate will close, for example.'

He had one grouse. Although the train was faster - 60kmh compared to the Skytrain's 48kmh - it was a jerkier ride as the train picked up speed to leave a station and decelerated quickly to stop.

CAAS said these glitches will be ironed out.

Retired teacher Alfred Wong, 67, is looking forward to the trains running around the clock instead of from 6am to 1.30am now. He said: 'Planes take off and land 24/7.'

The People Mover System will operate 24 hours by 2008, CAAS said.

http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/mnt...3-23/train.pdf

[email protected]

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
Since I can't try it when I leave (or maybe I could if time permits), I guess I could try squeezing out a little time like 5 mins or so upon my arrival at Terminal 1 in 5 weeks time to try out the new system (anyone knows how long Changi Airport allows you to stay in the transit area before you must pass through immigration?).
ignoramus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2006, 04:24 PM   #617
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
Since I can't try it when I leave (or maybe I could if time permits), I guess I could try squeezing out a little time like 5 mins or so upon my arrival at Terminal 1 in 5 weeks time to try out the new system (anyone knows how long Changi Airport allows you to stay in the transit area before you must pass through immigration?).
Actually according to lianhe zaobao, the public line is opening next friday......
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2006, 05:10 PM   #618
ignoramus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 3,020
Likes (Received): 4

If lianhe did not get it wrong, it could mean that the current public platform will be closed by next friday for reconstruction works and public passengers will have to board the new trains from a temporary platform across the new track from the new transit platform till the new public platform is completed. Public passengers would be separated from transit passengers by means of them being in separate cars. Speculation....

new transit platform
------------------new tracks---------
temporary public platform
------------------old tracks--------------
old public platform

Or if lianhe got it wrong it would just mean the public will have to take shuttle buses to and from T1 and T2 (I read it in some publication from the system's planner some time ago that it was a possibility) till the new public platform is ready.

Last edited by ignoramus; March 23rd, 2006 at 05:18 PM.
ignoramus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2006, 11:47 PM   #619
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
If lianhe did not get it wrong, it could mean that the current public platform will be closed by next friday for reconstruction works and public passengers will have to board the new trains from a temporary platform across the new track from the new transit platform till the new public platform is completed. Public passengers would be separated from transit passengers by means of them being in separate cars. Speculation....

new transit platform
------------------new tracks---------
temporary public platform
------------------old tracks--------------
old public platform

Or if lianhe got it wrong it would just mean the public will have to take shuttle buses to and from T1 and T2 (I read it in some publication from the system's planner some time ago that it was a possibility) till the new public platform is ready.
I'm not sure who's right or wrong......maybe we can e-mail CAAS to find out.....
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 24th, 2006, 12:33 AM   #620
Bertez
Registered User
 
Bertez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Sauga
Posts: 2,203
Likes (Received): 6

Those trains look great
__________________
........
Bertez no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
changi airport, singapore, singapore airlines, south asian hub airport

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium