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Old June 12th, 2006, 05:19 PM   #261
macgyver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pflo777
of course they wil...the whole question is when.

When I look back to the maglev development in germany it took 10 years, between the first working full scale model of a 450 km/h maglev and the status of being ready for commercial service....

And german engineers are known for not beiing the slowest and dumbest.

So I think that its possible that it will take quite a while until we will see the first 100% commercially usable maglev from china....
When China will be the largest economy in 2035 or 2040 ... ,
I almost certain for just Maglev technology ? .. they can do it in 7 to 9 years.

In 13 years .. China Maglev and German Maglev will be in the same position ... and also Japan.

Korea has this small scale I guess ? called ROTEM ?
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Old June 18th, 2006, 06:32 PM   #262
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What will be the length of the Munich track?
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Old June 21st, 2006, 04:52 PM   #263
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38 kilometers

there is a new video available for the munich maglev project

http://www.magnetbahn.de/site/shared...efilm__wmv.wmv

56 mb !!!
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Old June 22nd, 2006, 02:01 AM   #264
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Maglev is in its infancy and the fact that there are competing maglev technologies will make any development even more complicated. Nevertheless, maglev is definitely needed. The megalopolis phenomenon is approaching in more and more regions. Boston-DC is the obvious one, but then Raleigh-Birmingham and of course Sandiego-Seattle is one among many. There are options like building more roads or expanding airports to contain that growth in a feasible sustainable manner, but a maglev and no not conventional polluting comparatively slower trains are the answer. Anything that can move vast amounts of people and goods! 400mph or more on land is worth its cost.

In addition, there should be research into double decking maglev to increase capacity and not making it a LUXURY mode of transport. Not to mention double stacking or adding raillines in some areas.

Arduous but Simple.
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Old June 23rd, 2006, 01:46 AM   #265
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There's absolutely no conceivable reason to worry about double-decking maglev trains anytime soon. The limiting factor isn't the cost of the vehicles, nor congestion that limits the number of vehicles that can travel over the same section of track over a short period of time -- it's the unholy cost of building the track itself. Vehicle cost is the least of anyone's problems.

If anything, maglev's initial selling point will be increased choices as far as departure times go. Since the system can be 99% automated, it's not outrageous to envision small trains with 18-36 passengers staffed only by a single cabin attendant (partly to sell food & beverages, partly to keep an eye on things and prevent vandalism) that run between popular destinations at 5 or 10 minute headways. Missed the train to DC? No problem... the next one's leaving in 5 minutes.

Actually, I can think of a popular value-added service if a maglev line ever gets built... the return of private luxury "railcars" as an efficient alternative to corporate jets. Especially for the stretch between New York and Washington (for CEOs with weekly lunches with their Congressmen and Senators...)

In many ways, maglev is like PCS Cell Phones. The initial barrier to entry is staggeringly huge and expensive... but once the track gets built, it's in the owner's best interest to have as many users as possible, because the marginal cost of each additional vehicle using them beyond the first is basically zero, and they'll have capacity to burn.

My prediction: frequent, small vehicles, and ticket-pricing schemes that classify entire vehicles... a "first class" train might have 24 seats in 8 rows of 3 (2 on one side, 1 on the other) and get first priority for routing if delays crop up. A "third-class" train might have 40 seats, in 8 rows of 5... 3 on one side, 2 on the other, with less-appealing upholstery, the same number of bathrooms as a first and second class train (but used by more people), and a cabin attendant who's more "security guard" than "waitress". "Second-class" trains would actually be the main ones used during off-peak travel times and would be configured like planes... the first 2 or 3 rows configured like first-class trains (for "business-class" passengers), with the remaining rows in 2x2 configuration (not quite as spacious as first class, but not quite as gruesome as third).
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Old June 23rd, 2006, 02:03 AM   #266
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRZ
I hate it when people say the only use for Maglev is airport-bound travel. This is its worst use IMO. A monorail to the airport? Sure (works fabulously in Tokyo). A traditional express? Lots of cities do it, works well. Why switch to maglev for going to the airport when it has the potential to travel faster than aircraft a few times over (in a vacuum). Even outside a vacuum, why bother transferring to a 800km/h 737 flight when you are already travelling at 550km/h on the train and avoid the hassles with baggage carrousels and check-in counters and security which will all ensure that you lose at least an hour (if you're lucky) at both the airport you board and the airport you disembark? Don't forget the time lost taxiing around the stupid runway network, there goes half an hour at each airport as well, 3 hours extra time. The maglev technology should not go to the airport, but should replace the aircraft. It also has great potential for mass transit as its maintenance costs are nearly non-existant at low speeds (super-high speed maintenance costs might be high).
Edit Question already answered.. LOL

You are a romantic

Last edited by *UofT*; June 23rd, 2006 at 02:09 AM.
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Old July 25th, 2006, 02:25 AM   #267
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Permanent magnetic levitation, New Maglev tech developed by China!

This is definately good news. Once this is implemented, it should silence all those who claim China stealing German technology.

Related link:
http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/20...24_286049.html

The magnetically levitated train (or maglev train), as called "green transportation" is a breakthrough in the solution to urban traffic problems. Dalian's permanent magnetic levitation project team, a China's research organization of maglev train recently unveiled its fully self-own technology of magnetic engine, which the project team has spent many years in developing. China's first permanent magnet maglev line that runs along 3 kilometers has been put on the schedule of construction and will soon be launched into operation in the development zone of Dalian.

Nowadays, there are three types of magnetic levitation technology in the world, namely, superconducting electromagnetic levitation, normal-conducting electromagnetic levitation and permanent magnetic levitation. The first one is developed and possessed by Japan. The second is developed and owned by Germany. The third is independently developed by the Dalian permanent magnetic levitation project team, and is an innovation completely controlled by China. It is an entirely new technology.

The Dalian permanent magnetic levitation project team started to do research on permanent magnetic levitation in 1998. From 1998 to 2006, the project team made a number of breakthroughs and devised many innovative techniques. On August 7th 2003, a magnetically levitated vehicle made by the team for conveying park visitors was successful in the operation test, indicating that China has its own magnetic levitation technology. After that, the project team succeeded in solving 5 major technical issues. On December 26th 2004, they made a permanent maglev train that made satisfactory performances on a 70-meter long track during operation test.

Magnetic engine is the core technique of a maglev train. The magnetic engine inside a permanent maglev train is a decentralized power device developed by China on its own. This type of engine can help to cut costs dramatically and can reduce energy consumption by about 50 percent. The Dalian project team has managed to develop two types of magnetic engines, one with traction of 105 newtons and the other with traction of 15,000 newtons. The former, with a rated velocity of 140 kilometers per hour and a maximum velocity of 218 kilometers per hour, aims to be used in low-speed permanent maglev train. The latter, with a rated velocity of 268 kilometers per hour and a maxim velocity of 536 kilometers per hour, can be adopted in medium-speed passenger or cargo permanent maglev train.

According to Li Lingqun, a senior member of Dalian permanent magnetic levitation project team, the magnetic levitation technology of foreign countries face two bottleneck problems, namely enormous costs and week levitation force. With much more powerful levitation force, China's permanent maglev train costs 50 percent less than maglev trains developed by other countries.

Professor Yang Jianwu in Beijing University of Technology says, "It (permanent magnetic levitation technology) is a brand new drive technology for transportation and has great market potential. It is China's own magnetic levitation technology."

According to authoritative data, permanent maglev train has six following advantages. First, the train is energy-efficient and environment-friendly. It also has low energy consumption and produces little noise whilst running. Second, the permanent maglev train has high carrying capacity, which is equivalent to that of the current common train. Third, the train is very safe as it integrates carriages with railway and has a powerful control system. Accidents such as derailment and crashes will never happen to the permanent maglev train. Fourth, the total cost of construction of train and railway is much lower than the cost of any foreign counterpart. Fifth, the operation costs of permanent maglev trains are much lower than those of any other maglev trains in the world. It needs less money to run than the current common train. Sixth, this kind of maglev train is economical with land. The railway for this kind of train occupies less land than the expressway does.

By People's Daily Online
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Old August 11th, 2006, 03:00 PM   #268
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http://www.gulf-times.com/site/topic...8&parent_id=28

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Old August 11th, 2006, 03:01 PM   #269
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http://www.shanghaidaily.com/art/200...tches_fire.htm

Maglev train catches fire
2006-08-11
A MAGLEV train in Shanghai caught fire at about 3pm, according to local sources.

Smoke was found in the second carriage when the train heading for the Pudong International Airport just left the Longyang Road Station.

Firefighters hurried to the spot and passengers were soon evacuated. Casualties are being counted.

The maglev went into operation on December 31, 2002, when former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and former Chinese Premier Zhu Rongji took the maiden ride. The maglev line runs around 30 kilometers.



Last edited by pflo777; August 11th, 2006 at 03:23 PM.
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Old August 11th, 2006, 05:14 PM   #270
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pit.pit
[COLOR=Navy]The current estimations for the shanghai extension is 27 miillion US$ per km double track, INCLUDING all station buildings. That brings us to maybe 23 million US$ per km guideway construction costs.

That is about the same prize like for a conventional high speed train (TGV, Shinkansen, Acela, ICE, ....).

I think it is important to be aware that the advantage of maglev is not construction options, but the significantly reduced maintenance costs when running the system!
um, keep in mind that labor costs are SIGNIFICANTLY lower (probably over 8x) in China than labor costs here, both construction and operating costs would be much higher. That would mean conventional trains are actually cheaper if we could build it for the same price.
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Old November 22nd, 2007, 12:17 PM   #271
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Green light for Maglev factory

http://www.china.org.cn/english/government/232696.htm

Shanghai is planning to build a low-speed Maglev train-manufacturing factory in suburban Nanhui District.

The trains are expected to serve the urban railway transport system, city officials revealed yesterday.

The factory, which will cover an area of 230,000 square meters, is designed to generate 60 Maglevs and 300 levitation frames each year.

Each train will have a maximum speed of about 100 kilometers per hour, compared with the Maglev that runs between Longyang Road and Pudong International Airport and hits 430kmh.

Xu Jianguo, president of the Shanghai Electric Co Ltd, the train manufacturer, said the lower-speed models will be quieter and more eco-friendly.

Preliminary scientific research has been completed and the firm will start construction of the train and frame-production plant with a fixed-asset investment of 310 million yuan (US$42 million).

The information came after the Shanghai Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference yesterday held a seminar about the planning of Lingang New City in Nanhui. The small city, close to the Yangshan Deep-Water Port, will cover a total area of 296.5 square kilometers and have an estimated population of 800,000 by 2020.

Besides the Maglev base, the new city will also build a 330,000-square-meter coal-mine machinery production base and a 40,000-square-meter wind-power generator base.

(Shanghai Daily November 22, 2007)
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Old February 3rd, 2009, 09:27 PM   #272
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MISC | Maglev Rapid Transit Discussion

Maglev is often talked about in regard to as a HSR inter-city substitute. What about in regard to rapid mass transit? I know there is one line in Japan currently. What do people think of its potential implementation in the future both its liabilities and advantages. You think there will ever be a time when municipalities make the switch? Could it be good for future metros or even replace current metro lines?
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Old February 3rd, 2009, 09:45 PM   #273
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its even more marginal than monorail, isnt it?

and in this case you really only have a few businesses, so cities would be once again justified in their fear of little or no competition and outrageous pricing

i dont know any detail about the japanese or any other line, but i guess it was more like an experiment and showing off than the only possible solution to their traffic problem


as far as i can think, the only real advantage would be very quick acceleration, which if you have short distances between stations can push the average speed on the line up
but thats it

its probably more expensive to build and run, not to mention maintain than any other form


dunno
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Old February 4th, 2009, 04:33 AM   #274
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I've actually been thinking the same thing. I thought it would be incredible if Chicago replaced its entire Blue Line in Chicago with a maglev line like the Linimo in Nagoya. (the blue line is one of the only CTA lines that doesn't share tracks with any other line)

You are wrong about maglev's being more expensive to maintain. In my opinion, the best quality of a suburban (slow speed) maglev system is that there are no moving parts. There is nothing to wear out; no steel on steel grinding away. This also cuts down on noise considerably especially around curves! (I don't know why the CTA is so NOISY!!!) There is no need to grind the rails down periodically. No need to true the wheels to get rid of flat spots. No warping of the rails due to extreme temperature variants.

I have ridden the Linimo in Nagoya, Japan and was impressed! Does anyone know if they have released an operating and maintaining expense report? How much fare box recovery do they have?

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Old February 4th, 2009, 05:03 AM   #275
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When I read about the technology, it noted a smooth and quiet ride, but when I rode on the short maglev line in Shanghai, it wasn't the smoothest ride and it was exceptionally noisy. For short distance travel, I don't think it's feasible to use maglev. By the time acceleration reaches 500 km/h the train would've passed the next stop already. Perhaps it's more feasible for longer distance commuter rail where stations are spaced tens of km apart.
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Old February 4th, 2009, 05:08 AM   #276
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I saw a documentary once somewhere that in the future 2050 maybe, perhaps Maglev could replace aircraft transport between regional centres across countries not just across cities with much faster speeds from newer technologies?
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Old February 4th, 2009, 05:29 AM   #277
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Sorry, I apparently do not know how to post pictures.
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Old February 4th, 2009, 05:29 AM   #278
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyline Art View Post
I saw a documentary once somewhere that in the future 2050 maybe, perhaps Maglev could replace aircraft transport between regional centres across countries not just across cities with much faster speeds from newer technologies?
that would probably require speeds above 1000kph to beat/compete with aircraft

a maglev built entirely in a tube, operating in partial vacuum (reducing air resistance) would probably be able to achieve this speed and remain feasible (swissmetro), but i dont think its in the near future
and by that time we might be able to do this:
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Old February 4th, 2009, 05:32 AM   #279
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
When I read about the technology, it noted a smooth and quiet ride, but when I rode on the short maglev line in Shanghai, it wasn't the smoothest ride and it was exceptionally noisy. For short distance travel, I don't think it's feasible to use maglev. By the time acceleration reaches 500 km/h the train would've passed the next stop already. Perhaps it's more feasible for longer distance commuter rail where stations are spaced tens of km apart.
We are talking about different systems. The maglev train in Nagoya has a top speed of about 100km/h, is exceptionally quiet and smooth. While the Shanghai maglev resembles the TGV or Shinkansen, the Linimo in Nagoya resembles a regular subway train.

These pictures are from flickr

image hosted on flickr


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/40/10...ab5b04.jpg?v=0

Luke

Last edited by lkstrknb; February 4th, 2009 at 05:38 AM.
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Old February 4th, 2009, 05:36 AM   #280
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Sorry, I apparently do not know how to post pictures!

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