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Old February 10th, 2009, 01:05 AM   #301
lkstrknb
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It is interesting that the high speed maglev in Shanghai gets all the press and attention while the Nagoya maglev gets none. I've read many times that the Shanghai maglev is the only maglev in the world in commercial operation. This irritates me.

The technology is mature and is ready to be built anywhere. I just wonder if they are soliciting transit systems around the world trying to get contracts. I would absolutely love to see this HSST technology built somewhere else. One thing that is disappointing is that the track is much too overbuilt. Instead of building it like a monorail with beams supporting the guideway, they built a bridge and placed the track on top of it. They did the same thing with the monorail in Jacksonville FL.

Nagoya Linimo maglev
image hosted on flickr


Daejeon Maglev
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Jacksonville Florida monorail
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Walt Disney World monorail
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Old February 10th, 2009, 01:49 AM   #302
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Although this is my speculation, I think it is due to construction codes for maintance personnel safety which have gotten strict the past decade in Japan.
It also has to do with emergency exit for passangers from the train in case something went wrong.
An automated train system, the Yurikamome here in Japan had to evacuate the passangers on board when the system broke down. This can not be done without the walkway beside the rail.
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Old February 10th, 2009, 03:23 AM   #303
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This isn't true, at least not for monorails in Japan. These are pictures of the Tama monorail which opened in 1997 and the Okinawa monorail which opened in 2003. The Tama monorail features an emergency walkway while the Okinawa monorail does not. Japan does require there to be doors on either end of the monorail for passenger egress onto the beam.

Perhaps the planners of the Linimo designed the bridge for easier access to the track and the electromagnets. Who knows?

Tama monorail
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Okinawa monorail
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Old February 10th, 2009, 08:36 AM   #304
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The train end doors on Japanese monorails aren't for getting out on to the beam - that would be madness!

They are for staff to couple two trains together, or transferring passengers from one train to another.

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Old February 10th, 2009, 12:03 PM   #305
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkstrknb View Post
It is interesting that the high speed maglev in Shanghai gets all the press and attention while the Nagoya maglev gets none. I've read many times that the Shanghai maglev is the only maglev in the world in commercial operation. This irritates me.
Just compare Formula One and racing karts (like the one you see in Mariokart) They are both racing cars, but when people talk about racing car, it is usually F1.

Shanghai is the world's only commercially operating (fast) maglev. Wait! There is slow maglev "Linimo"! - so what...
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Old February 10th, 2009, 12:04 PM   #306
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkstrknb View Post
It is interesting that the high speed maglev in Shanghai gets all the press and attention while the Nagoya maglev gets none. I've read many times that the Shanghai maglev is the only maglev in the world in commercial operation. This irritates me.

Luke
Quite possibly because when people think Mag-lev, they think High Speed. And to be fair, the only Commercial High Speed Mag-lev is indeed in Shanghai.

Berlin has had an urban Mag-Lev for ages... but it never gets press either.
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Old February 10th, 2009, 04:46 PM   #307
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2co2co View Post
Just compare Formula One and racing karts (like the one you see in Mariokart) They are both racing cars, but when people talk about racing car, it is usually F1.

Shanghai is the world's only commercially operating (fast) maglev. Wait! There is slow maglev "Linimo"! - so what...
Yeah, I wanted to ask the same question, what is the commercial speed of the line Linimo Nagoya?

And I really don't understand why he showed photos of Tama Monorail and others? Do they have anything in common with Maglev? There are dozens of monorail systems all over the world. But they are far away from Maglev in terms of similarity.
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Old February 10th, 2009, 07:38 PM   #308
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And I really don't understand why he showed photos of Tama Monorail and others? Do they have anything in common with Maglev? There are dozens of monorail systems all over the world. But they are far away from Maglev in terms of similarity.
Do you read, or just look at the pictures? All the pictures were very relevant to the the thread. I showed the Tama and Okinawa monorails to show that japan does not require a walkway being placed next to public transport systems (in this case monorails).

In the previous post with pictures, I was comparing the Linimo system to the Jacksonville monorail because they both have overbuilt structures.
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Old February 11th, 2009, 12:12 AM   #309
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The train end doors on Japanese monorails aren't for getting out on to the beam - that would be madness!
According to the monorail society website, the doors on the end are for emergencies so passengers can transfer from one monorail train to another rescue monorail train. You were right that they wouldn't be for passengers to escape on to the beam.

"The door at the front cab is required by Japanese Monorail Association standards to allow train to train evacuations in the rare event of mechanical failure or emergency."

http://www.monorails.org/tmspages/TDLprvw.html
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Old February 19th, 2009, 04:38 PM   #310
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ODU scientists have liftoff on maglev experiment - Norfolk VA

http://hamptonroads.com/2009/02/odu-...lev-experiment

ODU scientists have liftoff on maglev experiment

By Debbie Messina
The Virginian-Pilot
© February 18, 2009

NORFOLK

It might not look like much now, a nondescript hunk of metal and magnets moving across a track, but it's a milestone in the development of a maglev train at Old Dominion University.

ODU scientists have successfully levitated and propelled a maglev test sled across a small section of elevated track that's lain dormant on campus for several years.

"This is sort of a big one for us," said Jeremiah Creedon, ODU's director of transportation research.

Maglev uses magnets to float a train over elevated tracks.

ODU is working to develop an affordable, energy-efficient low-to-medium-speed maglev train that could be used in urban settings.

The only commercial maglev in the world, a high-speed train in China, cost billions of dollars to develop and billions more to build.

The university's maglev team - assembled after earlier attempts to develop a maglev train in partnership with private industry failed both technically and financially - is enthusiastic about recent test runs.

The 4,000-pound test sled, or bogie, is just the inner workings of a maglev vehicle. It's essentially half of the chassis that would be attached to the bottom of a complete vehicle.

The tests are confined to an 85-foot stretch of track with a vehicle speed of about 5 mph. The test runs over the past several days have not been perfect.

For instance, there were problems with getting a consistent power supply to the track during testing Tuesday afternoon, causing the test sled to stop abruptly at times. Creedon discovered several hours later that the campus had problems with a transformer cable at the time of the testing, but he was not sure whether it contributed to the problem.

Next week, the test bogie will be removed from the track and returned to the lab for further tweaks.

"The performance is good, though it's not quite at the level we need for an operational system," Creedon said.

Still, he said, the progress could be enough to attract much-needed outside funding for the demonstration project.

A modest level of research and development has been sustained over the past two years through grants of about $120,000 a year from the university's Office of Research. During that time, maglev scientists were confined to the laboratory; the track was inaccessible because of campus construction.

The next step is to run the test sled from a wireless command system for longer stretches of track and at faster speeds.

Then comes developing and testing a full-size vehicle. Creedon could not offer a timetable on the development.

Meanwhile, ODU has partnered with a Massachusetts-based company to test another maglev train on its campus. MagneMotion Inc. is expected to bring its prototype maglev vehicle, which is about the size of van, to the campus to test early next year.

The partnership, announced a year ago, has received support from a $6.3 million federally funded program. More than $700,000 will go to ODU for its role.

The partnership will help the university fulfill a goal of becoming a nationally renowned research center for maglev development.

Debbie Messina, (757) 446-2588, [email protected]
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Old February 19th, 2009, 04:41 PM   #311
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Maglev set for debut next month


A new maglev train that may one day provide an alternative to existing public transport systems is set to roll off the production line in April, the Beijing Daily reported yesterday.

Liu Zhiming, chairman of Beijing Enterprises Holdings Maglev Technology Development Co Ltd, which developed the train in cooperation with the National University of Defense Technology, said the magnetic levitation locomotive is a low- to medium-speed train, with a top speed of 120 kph.

The technology it uses was wholly developed in China, Chang Wensen, chief designer with the university's maglev technology research center, said.

The new train offers huge potential for public transport, Liu said.

The Shenzhen metro company approached Beijing Enterprises and asked it to conduct a feasibility study into the use of the maglev technology for the city's No 8 urban rail project, Liu told China Daily.

The study was started in December and will be completed next month, he said.

"But it's still too early to say if Shenzhen will become the first user of our technology," he said. "They want to compare the pros and cons of using maglev as opposed to the traditional light rail option."

At present, only Japan has a low-to-medium maglev line in commercial operation.

Several research institutes, including Southwest Jiaotong University, the scientific research institute of the Ministry of Railways, and the Institute of Electrical Engineering under the Chinese Academy of Sciences, have launched and later aborted similar research projects.

The locomotive developed by Beijing Enterprises has been in testing for the past eight years. In that time, it has traveled some 30,000 km on the firm's two test tracks in Changsha, Hubei province, and Tangshan in Hebei province.

"The maglev train will be ready to go into mass production once it has completed 100,000 test kilometers," Liu said.

The use of low-to-medium speed maglev trains for urban transport has won support from several experts.

Sun Zhang, a professor at Tongji University, was quoted by Beijing Business Today as saying that while the system has a similar operating speed to the subway (average 80 kph), the maglev train is cheaper to build and run.

Also, compared with light rail options, the maglev is less noisy, has a smaller turning circle and better climbing capacity, he said.

The public need not worry about electromagnetic radiation, as low-speed maglev trains generate no more radiation than an average TV set, Liu said.

(China Daily February 18, 2009)
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Old February 19th, 2009, 04:47 PM   #312
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This is exciting! The Shenzhen metro may be the next city to install a maglev subway train! I'd love to see some video of this new technology. All we have is a picture so far. We'll have to wait and see.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 05:21 AM   #313
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Urban Maglev

Right now only the big systems(one) work well. And it was expensive. Maglev has great potential for high speed rail options and will be the choice for future HSR lines once the tech becomes more affordable. However, what about Maglev for mass transit in cities?

"Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va is working to develop an affordable, energy-efficient low-to-medium-speed maglev train that could be used in urban settings."

Link to Article
http://hamptonroads.com/2009/02/odu-...lev-experiment

I think it is good that someone is trying to create another option for urban transit, cities need more options. The only reasons why it is not in use now is the systems are expensive and there are some kinks still to be knocked out. Urban maglev will someday be as cheap as LRT. The trains are smoother and can accelerate and travel pretty fast.


What do you guys think?
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 05:49 AM   #314
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I think it's too expensive (at the moment obviously). There's another urban MagLev currently in operation in Japan.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linimo
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 05:51 AM   #315
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Ya, thats the eventual goal, to get the costs down.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 11:27 AM   #316
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I think it's too expensive (at the moment obviously). There's another urban MagLev currently in operation in Japan.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linimo
In that article it says the line amounted to $100 million per km. That doesn't sound to bad to me.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 02:28 PM   #317
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once again a maglev thread... Mobius57, how about using the search?
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Old March 4th, 2009, 04:05 PM   #318
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http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=800674

I opend a thread on the subject a few months ago as well.
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Old October 7th, 2009, 10:50 PM   #319
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China tests new Maglev Train

This is an old youtube from over the summer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgGVS663utg

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Old August 26th, 2010, 08:00 AM   #320
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Incheon maglev rail under construction

http://joongangdaily.joins.com/artic...sp?aid=2924113

August 04, 2010

Korea started construction of a rail for a magnetic levitation train yesterday, which the government called a major step toward commercializing more eco-friendly transport services.

The groundbreaking ceremony was held at Incheon International Airport. The 6.1-kilometer (3.8-mile) rail will be used to test maglev train prototypes, according to the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs. Six stops and one train depot will be built on the line.

Maglev trains use a powerful magnetic field to float above the rails, causing less noise, friction and vibration than conventional trains. They can run at a top speed of 110 kilometers per hour, the ministry said.

Construction began after the government launched a project in 2006 to commercialize unmanned maglev train service. A total of 450 billion won ($385 million) will be invested in the project.


Yonhap
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