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Old August 19th, 2009, 06:20 PM   #861
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Old August 22nd, 2009, 06:35 PM   #862
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Forgot your wheelchair on the bus? KMB ensures all is not lost
20 August 2009
SCMP

Wheelchairs, figures of the Buddhist goddess of mercy Kwun Yum and wigs are among 4,000 items left behind on buses each month, according to KMB. But since January an electronic lost-property management system launched by the bus company has been helping reunite owners with their property.

By July, it had handled about 1,700 cases of lost property a month. The monthly total of items handled, since passengers sometimes leave more than one item at a time, came to more than 4,000.

The Octopus card was the object most commonly left behind, constituting 13 per cent of the total, Wong Hon-chuen, operations manager of KMB's Lai Chi Kok depot, said.

Hong Kong dollars, purses and mobile phones followed, at 10, 9 and 8 per cent of the total respectively. Hong Kong identity cards ranked fifth, at 7 per cent.

Bulky items did not make it to the top of the list, but they are also commonly seen by staff from the lost-property section. They include baby strollers, fishing rods, drills and computer circuitry.

There are musical instruments, including violins and erhu. Wheelchairs and walking sticks were also among the forgotten items.

Mr Wong recalled some happy reunions.

In 2005, a retired man had left his camera, in which were photos taken during a trip before his health deteriorated.

In another case, a woman left a laptop belonging to her company on a bus. The relieved employee drew a cartoon thanking KMB staff when she recovered it.

Since the launch of the electronic system, about 70 to 80 per cent of items have found their way back into owners' hands. Previously, KMB did not even record figures.

Lost property records of all depots and bus terminuses are put into the system, and staff can locate items within a few seconds.

Previously, records of lost items were handwritten, and various depots kept different records. Passengers who had travelled on more than one bus before noticing they had lost property had to wait for KMB staff to search records at different depots.

On the first day after losing an item, a passenger should contact a terminus supervisor. Supervisors keep lost items for a day before sending them to the lost-property management team. People can also call KMB's hotline, 2745 4466, to retrieve lost property.
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Old August 28th, 2009, 04:54 AM   #863
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Time to cut the number of buses on our roads
24 August 2009
South China Morning Post

Bus travel in Hong Kong is like no other city in the world. Well-serviced routes mean that waits at stops are generally no more than a few minutes. But buses are also the most congesting and polluting vehicles in the transport network and the government has long been trying to ensure that there are not too many on the roads. An analysis by this newspaper has found that the success so far has been dismal.

A decade of discussion and programmes have caused only a minimal drop in the number of buses and routes on our busiest roads. Just 0.972 per cent of trips were cut last year on the main thoroughfares of Central, Causeway Bay and Mong Kok. This was higher than for the two previous years and about a third of the figure for the best on record, 2005. Such data augers poorly for the government's recently announced proposal that there be a further 10 per cent cut to improve the quality of roadside air.

Suspended particles are the most harmful part of air pollution to health. They cause all manner of ailments, from breathing difficulties to lung tissue damage. Diesel-fuelled buses cause 6 per cent of this type of pollution in our city. The streets of Central, Causeway Bay and Mong Kok are the worst affected.

Reducing the number of buses on the roads of these districts is an obvious way of improving air quality. Gridlock at peak travel times would be lessened. The government said in its recently released air quality objectives review that the approach was also a highly cost-effective way of tackling pollution. Despite the benefits, our research proves that this is easier said than done.

Implementation has been limited by the conflicting interests of bus companies, commuters, district politicians and rail operators. They have been reluctant to back rail interchanges, fewer buses on routes serving our most polluted areas, and bans. Authorities, conscious of their lack of a popular mandate to make decisions, invariably give each interest group the power of veto. The result is that buses travelling along Nathan Road in Tsim Sha Tsui, Yee Wo Street in Causeway Bay and Connaught, Des Voeux and Queen's roads in Central nearing their destinations are usually three-quarters empty. Generally, the routes they are on run beside an MTR line. People working and shopping in the areas are consequently exposed to more dangerous levels of pollution than should be the case.

The same pattern applies to the majority of government policies. It is why the ban on smoking in public places and the levy on plastic bags took so long to move from community discussion to legislation - and even then, being slowly put into effect in stages. We have it to thank for inaction on idling vehicle engines, an electronic road pricing system, household waste recycling and the drawing up of a harbourside development plan, among much else. If we cannot make a decision as simple as cutting bus traffic in busy and polluted areas, how can more challenging issues like health care and taxation reform be broached?

The lack of progress is no single person or group's fault. Each has its reasons for maintaining the status quo. Regardless, though, these interests cannot get in the way of the common good. The community as a whole has to be served.

Delay, watering-down and inaction are no way to govern Hong Kong. Our city has pressing needs. Authorities have for too long let the interests of a minority get in the way of community ones. A simple place to start in changing their approach is to ensure that fewer buses clog and pollute our busiest streets.
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Old August 28th, 2009, 02:06 PM   #864
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If Hong Kong authorities are genuinely trying to reduce the number of buses on the roads, as claimed by the article in post 336, then there is something seriously wrong with their head.

They should be congratulating themselves that buses are well used in Hong Kong, and that there aren't that many more cars on the roads which are far more responsible for pollution and congestion.
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Old August 28th, 2009, 03:18 PM   #865
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCT View Post
If Hong Kong authorities are genuinely trying to reduce the number of buses on the roads, as claimed by the article in post 336, then there is something seriously wrong with their head.

They should be congratulating themselves that buses are well used in Hong Kong, and that there aren't that many more cars on the roads which are far more responsible for pollution and congestion.
The density of buses in HK has reached a point where there are a lot of duplicated routes, and empty vehicles running on the same road, causing congestion for the buses themselves. The congestion then leads to more serious road side pollution due to these idling heavy diesel engines.

Yes, congestion is caused by public buses, not cars or lorries in some part of HK.
It is somewhat unique compares to other cities around the world.
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Old August 28th, 2009, 06:37 PM   #866
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I've never been to Hong Kong so I can only talk in general terms here.

As for route duplication and bus jams (phenomena not limited to Hong Kong - in fact London and Shanghai suffer from these problems too), they should be tackled and branded specifically, with emphasis on 'more efficient use of resources'. The way the above article was worded was as though the authorities were trying to cut the number of buses for the sake of doing so or beyond what is necessary. Of course it could just be a case of bad choice of words in the article.

From my observation of HK buses and anecdotal evidence, they seem to be generally very well used, quite possibly better used than London Buses. Do I sense a storm in a tea-cup there.
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Old August 28th, 2009, 07:10 PM   #867
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCT View Post
I've never been to Hong Kong so I can only talk in general terms here.

As for route duplication and bus jams (phenomena not limited to Hong Kong - in fact London and Shanghai suffer from these problems too), they should be tackled and branded specifically, with emphasis on 'more efficient use of resources'. The way the above article was worded was as though the authorities were trying to cut the number of buses for the sake of doing so or beyond what is necessary. Of course it could just be a case of bad choice of words in the article.

From my observation of HK buses and anecdotal evidence, they seem to be generally very well used, quite possibly better used than London Buses. Do I sense a storm in a tea-cup there.
The government way to see this is to better allocate resource for better efficiency, so to reduce pollution.

In reality, it isn't just a case of resource and efficiency.
It's also a case of competition between bus operators, and transport modes.
Bus operators compete with each other to put as much vehicles as possible out on the road to maximize profit. It has added many point-to-point routes with very high frequency services, and many empty vehicles on the road.

On the other hands, the operators also compete with the MTR.
The government wants to reduce the cross districts point-to-point routes, and convert the extra buses into feeder bus for the rail. This reduces the number of buses going into the prime area. However, as stated in the article, it's in opposition by the operators and the district council. The operators are in oppose to the rail monopoly; and the district council is in favour with the more direct transport service in addition to the rail.

From a passenger point of view, bus service in HK is indeed better than many places around the world. They are relatively comfortable, low cost, and frequent service.
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Old August 28th, 2009, 08:44 PM   #868
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Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I would imagine that the MTR is generally well used and that there is little capacity for extra passengers (those who previously use the bus for example).

As for companies competing against each other, I'm quite surprised that Hong Kong hasn't got a more regulated bus market, like that in London for example. If the government is the main decision maker over routes and fares then you could end up with much more efficient allocation of resources and a more systematic fare structure.
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Old August 28th, 2009, 09:01 PM   #869
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Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I would imagine that the MTR is generally well used and that there is little capacity for extra passengers (those who previously use the bus for example).

As for companies competing against each other, I'm quite surprised that Hong Kong hasn't got a more regulated bus market, like that in London for example. If the government is the main decision maker over routes and fares then you could end up with much more efficient allocation of resources and a more systematic fare structure.
The MTR is well used, but there are still reserved capacity, especially in the outskirt locations, except at a few very popular stations. But since HK is extremely dense, the population is enough to support the public transportation operation without the government subsidizing directly.
They are all making profit, no one is in deficit.

Regular bus services in HK is franchised to the few operators. The government does regulate the use of vehicles, frequency, routes and fare, but the operator can request to adjust and subject to the district council and/or government approval.

It is always easy to establish new route, but very difficult to take service away. As also mentioned in the article, it's a more politic decision by the district council members, rather than operation/planning/financial decision by the operators or the top government authorities.
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Old August 28th, 2009, 09:12 PM   #870
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Thanks for the explanation Eric.

I guess that even though bus routes might parallel MTR lines for significant proportions, there is still enough differentiation between the two in terms of distance between stations/stop (convenience) and fares (I would suspect that bus fares are cheaper than MTR fares?). Therefore having bus routes become mere feeder services is easier said than done IMO.

In any case Hong Kong has one of the best public transport systems in the world!
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Old August 28th, 2009, 09:22 PM   #871
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Many bus fares, especially in longer-distance routes, now cost more than the MTR. This is especially true for cross-harbour routes between Hong Kong Island and Kowloon. Following the merger between MTR and KCR, cross-harbour subway fares were drastically reduced especially for suburban routes.

Nevertheless, many still prefer buses since they can sit down comfortably and they go point-to-point.
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Old August 28th, 2009, 09:33 PM   #872
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Thanks for the explanation Eric.

I guess that even though bus routes might parallel MTR lines for significant proportions, there is still enough differentiation between the two in terms of distance between stations/stop (convenience) and fares (I would suspect that bus fares are cheaper than MTR fares?). Therefore having bus routes become mere feeder services is easier said than done IMO.

In any case Hong Kong has one of the best public transport systems in the world!
It isn't a "might" that bus route parallel with MTR, they are actually in parallel.
But it's about convenience. Point-to-point routes offer direct services almost anywhere to elsewhere in a timely manner, even in long distance. Unlike other cities where long distance routes may just be a feeder bus for rail, and would take forever to ride.

The big advantage is the fast p2p routes is it does not require transfer from route to route, or even modes, which HK people hate to do so. The disadvantage is it does not maximize the usage of every single bus or every single train.

If there is a choice to travel from point A to B at about the same cost by either a direct bus, or MTR which requires one transfer of route, many HK people would still prefer the direct bus, unless s/he doesn't know that route exists.

In terms of fare, both are about the same. In some routes, bus can be cheaper than the MTR; but in some routes, it may vice versa. Majority of services aren't one fare for all, or calculated base on zones, but very closely related to the actual route distance (not the passenger travel distance. )

Moreover, buses and rail are only two of the many modes that are in direct competition in public transportation. There are still taxis, minibuses, ferries and the trams.
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Old August 30th, 2009, 07:06 AM   #873
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By GX7205 from a Hong Kong bus forum :





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Old September 1st, 2009, 06:06 PM   #874
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Bus operators fail to give fare discounts
1 September 2009
South China Morning Post

Two bus operators have failed to give promised discounts worth HK$17,000 to 2,766 passengers in the past seven years, an investigation prompted by a passenger's inquiry has found.

Citybus and its sister company, New World First Bus, said they had identified 3,774 cases, involving 2,766 Octopus cards, of failure to offer the Same Day Return discount or Bus-Bus Interchange discount.

An activist monitoring public transport said the government should set up a panel to regularly check for charging errors.

"The problem {hellip} is probably much bigger than revealed in recent investigations," said Richard Tsoi Yiu-cheong, chairman of the Coalition to Monitor Public Transport and Utilities. "There are a lack of mechanisms for {hellip} checks against overcharging. We can't rely on operators to investigate their own mistakes."

He said an online database should be created for Octopus cardholders to easily check their records of transactions. A query in August last year by a woman who was not given the Bus-Bus Interchange discount for a trip on Citybus Route 926X led to the inquiry.

The two operators said their investigative team had traced back to 2003 failures to provide the two types of discounts, identifying overcharging of about HK$17,000, which they said would be refunded. The major affected routes were 2A, 6, 73, 788, 962, 969 and E23.

They said the problem lay in the fare discount calculation software, adding that the probability of such a failure was less than two cases in every million transactions.

The operators apologised and offered to refund double the overcharged amount.

All the affected Octopus card numbers have been listed at www.nwstbus.com.hk.
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 07:44 PM   #875
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Source: www.discuss.com.hk

Driver's feedback on HK Buses

Original:

LEYLAND OLYMPIAN--油門超輕, 行程超短, 但迫力超重, 完全唔合"比例"; 吉蘭控油都算OK, 但老虎頭會好難就, 一掂油架車會標住走;

DENNIS DRAGON--油門同迫力既力度尚算平衡, 但都屬於回彈力強, 揸一日都幾攰;

VOLVO SERIES--基本上所有VOLVO操控都十分接近, 亦似私家車, 勞動強度較低, 唯一有唔同既係用CUMMINS引擎款式, 加速會較"癲"; 揸B10M時感覺架車大架左, 而B12又覺得細架左;

LEYLAND VICTORY II--油門板行程長, 所以雞車可以比少少油, 用低轉數前進; 香港所有巴士車款, 小弟覺得雞車最好玩!!!

DENNIS JUBILANT--最辛苦: 1.軑艙窄, 2.熱, 超熱! 減肥一流!!! 架車又"凳"......

DART--冇力, 開得快成架車都好震;

LANCE--引擎聲, 操控似揸大車, 但速度唔似, 而且成架車都好似好單薄, 一過氹連堂軑都左搖右擺;

MCW--軑感輕, 油門輕, 迫力輕, 不過唔夠軑;

SCANIA N113--好好揸, 同VOLVO有得比;

TRIDENT--比DRAGON文明, 各種操控冇以前咁彈, 唯早版TRIDENT好容易推頭, 所以唔可以急劈彎;

手掣冇跟車款, 所以只分大, 細, VOLVO款同TRIDENT款; 唔使講, VOLVO款最輕最好用, TRIDENT款有D實, 需要少少拉力; 而OLYMPIAN既細手掣都要用D力, 但勉強可以接受; 最難用係DRAGON大手掣, 回彈力特強, 試過甩手比個掣彈親隻中指......

Translation (To be finished)

LEYLAND OLYMPIAN: The acceleration pedals are light. (?) The brakes are heavy. Those fitted with Gardner engine (Earlier series manufactured in 1980s, the non air-con ones) has acceptable acceleration control. However, those fitted with Cummins engine (1990s, non air-con or air-con) has mediocre acceleration control.

DENNIS DRAGON: Poor design of handbrakes. Excessive fatigue are frequent amongst drivers of DENNIS DRAGON.
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 07:47 PM   #876
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VOLVO SERIES (INCLUDING B10M, OLYMPIAN, B12) : The best driving performance amongst all HK buses.

LEYLAND VICTORY II: Long (? ) of the acceleration pedals, the most interesting ones for drivers.

628's Note: LEYLAND VICTORY II is not the most comfortable to drive at all. The driver may find it interesting to have such long (?) acceleration pedals. (I don't understand that Chinese word "行程" in this context) The suspension system of LEYLAND VICTORY II was notorious. Most of LEYLAND VICTORY II retired earlier than their DENNIS JUBILANT counterparts, which are the worst for HK buses built after 1978.
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Old September 5th, 2009, 04:19 PM   #877
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VOLVO SERIES (INCLUDING B10M, OLYMPIAN, B12) : The best driving performance amongst all HK buses.

LEYLAND VICTORY II: Long (? ) of the acceleration pedals, the most interesting ones for drivers.

628's Note: LEYLAND VICTORY II is not the most comfortable to drive at all. The driver may find it interesting to have such long (?) acceleration pedals. (I don't understand that Chinese word "行程" in this context) The suspension system of LEYLAND VICTORY II was notorious. Most of LEYLAND VICTORY II retired earlier than their DENNIS JUBILANT counterparts, which are the worst for HK buses built after 1978.
I love the Victory II, it's still the best bus IMO, despite its high flip over rate.
KMB did retire its Victory fleet before the Dennis Jubilant, but it's vice versa in NWFB/CMB.
It's climbing and maneuver ability in the hilly terrain of HKI was just superior.
No another model can even comes close.
Too bad they aren't in service anymore.

p.s. I think the sentence you don't fully understand just means "Extended gas pedal." The pedal is about a foot long, but the pivot point is closer to the bottom part which act like a lever.
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Old September 10th, 2009, 04:39 AM   #878
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Old September 11th, 2009, 05:29 PM   #879
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By EY607 from a Hong Kong bus forum :

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Old September 14th, 2009, 01:16 PM   #880
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By ~『 Mr . G.E.M. 』~ from a Hong Kong bus forum :







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