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Old March 3rd, 2009, 03:03 AM   #1
Gareth
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Parking, waiting, stopping etc

I would be interested to know how parking, waiting and stopping restrictions are denoted in various countries.

Here in the UK, we have a double-yellow line, which denotes 'no waiting at any time', which also bans parking. Apart from on one-way streets, the lines are always on the left and apply to both sides of the road.




A single yellow line denotes the same thing but that the restrictions are only in operaton at certain times on the day.




A sign like this tells you what times a single yellow line applies...




In London, red lines are used in a similar fashion to denote stopping restrictons. I've never seen them anywhere else, with most parts just using the international No Stopping sign. I can't find any decent images of this, but it looks essentially the same as above.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 05:02 AM   #2
Verso
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Slovenia:



The sign is in the bilingual area, I didn't find one without Italian. And usually they say "Mon-Fri", not "at workdays". We don't have lines like the UK though.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 06:25 AM   #3
Alex Von Königsberg
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In the USA, the parking restrictions are indicated by the colour of the kerb:
  • Red - No stopping
  • Yellow - Stopping for loading/unloading only
  • Green - Parking is allowed for a certain period of time
  • White - Post vehicles only (although I am not sure)
If there is no colour and no meter, it means the parking is regulated by the parking signs along the street.

In Ukraine and Russia, kerb may also be coloured:
  • Solid yellow - No stopping and no parking (1.4 on the picture)
  • Dashed yellow - Stopping for loading/unloading only (1.10)
  • Yellow Zigzag - Parking for taxis and PT only (1.17)




Most likely, however, the parking will be regulated by the international parking signs without painted kerb (as in the rest of Europe). The signs from left to right are: a) no stopping, b) stopping is allowed but no parking c) No parking on odd days, d) no parking on even days


Last edited by Alex Von Königsberg; March 3rd, 2009 at 06:37 AM.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 06:53 AM   #4
Robosteve
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There are quite a lot of different signs in NSW to indicate what sort of vehicles may and may not stop in a particular zone, so I just took screenshots of the "Parking" section of the Road Users' Handbook, published by the RTA.

[IMG]http://i43.************/2howdbl.png[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i44.************/2mzmpzr.png[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i40.************/abox8o.png[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i44.************/332w239.png[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i43.************/34edj52.png[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i42.************/29m6hdu.png[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i39.************/21amjb9.png[/IMG]
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 09:25 AM   #5
ChrisZwolle
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Netherlands:

1. No parking allowed


2. Also not allowed to even stop.


3. Parking.


4. You need a parking disk here.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 06:48 PM   #6
Gareth
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It seems lines or painted kerbs are rare in much of Europe. If only signs are used, how do you know where the signs influence begin and end?
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 07:01 PM   #7
Radish2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
Slovenia:



The sign is in the bilingual area, I didn't find one without Italian. And usually they say "Mon-Fri", not "at workdays". We don't have lines like the UK though.
Ah, that´s typical again, such a professional and decent looking sing you would only expect at very new parking lots in Germany or Austria, but no, it´s in Slovenia and it looks even better, awesome.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 07:06 PM   #8
Gareth
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You seem genuinely surpised that Slovenian civilization is sophisticated enough to be able to erect a decent waiting restrictions sign.

I know it's not exactly the pyramids, but...
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 07:36 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth View Post
It seems lines or painted kerbs are rare in much of Europe. If only signs are used, how do you know where the signs influence begin and end?
They use them too in the Netherlands, but it depends on municipality. They are mostly used to mark the "parking disk" zones with blue lines. Yellow lines are rarely used, usually relics from the past.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 07:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth View Post
It seems lines or painted kerbs are rare in much of Europe. If only signs are used, how do you know where the signs influence begin and end?
In Sweden, parking is regulated by the same signs as in the Netherlands and most of Europe. The sign's influence begins where the sign is located and until another sign, or until the next road. Sometimes an arrow pointed downwards under the sign is used to indicate the end of influence.

We have a whole bunch of signs and rules that regulate parking and stopping. I'll check the road administration's website to see if I can find anything.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 08:37 PM   #11
RawLee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth View Post
It seems lines or painted kerbs are rare in much of Europe. If only signs are used, how do you know where the signs influence begin and end?
First lesson when driving is taught:if you dont see a cancelling sign,its valid until the next junction...(basically all signs fall under this,but of course,there are exceptions...)
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 08:41 PM   #12
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Basically all signs without those being a closed "zone" in the Netherlands. If you drive outside city limits, and the speed goes from 80 to 50, you can drive 80 again after the next intersection unless 50 is signed.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 08:57 PM   #13
Verso
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth View Post
It seems lines or painted kerbs are rare in much of Europe. If only signs are used, how do you know where the signs influence begin and end?
As already said, with the first intersection, unless it's a zone, in which case there's a sign depicting the end of it. If a road is wide enough for permanent parking spaces, they are drawn.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth View Post
You seem genuinely surpised that Slovenian civilization is sophisticated enough to be able to erect a decent waiting restrictions sign.

I know it's not exactly the pyramids, but...
I don't think he's 'genuinely surprised', just very enthusiastic. I know what he likes most: the shiny edge of the sign.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 10:40 PM   #14
Majestic
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In Poland we only have signs that regulate parking and stopping issues.


Here's a sign that forbids stopping during certain hours. Violating it might get your car hauled.
image hosted on flickr



And here's a similar parking forbidden sign:
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 10:53 PM   #15
PLH
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What's interesting, this is the only sign in Poland which end is posted like this:



This sign says no parking on odd days


and even ones:
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 10:54 PM   #16
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In Romania, there are the same signs as in all of Europe. Recently the law is being enforced and a lot of signs restricting or allowing parking are put on streets.



However...

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Old March 3rd, 2009, 10:56 PM   #17
PLH
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I suppose I saw that once or twice

edit: Hey, only roughly one eigth of that Dacia is breaking the law
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 11:01 PM   #18
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What do those arrows mean? You see them a lot in Switzerland too.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 11:02 PM   #19
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It means the restriction is still present and will be until a sign with an arrow down is posted.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 11:07 PM   #20
Radish2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
I don't think he's 'genuinely surprised', just very enthusiastic. I know what he likes most: the shiny edge of the sign.
Not only, the whole sign looks like the country has very hih standart, and it aktually has, whenever I go through Slovenia I am amazed how everything looks, how clean etc.
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